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October 03, 1898 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1898-10-03

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c1jc U. or

Al . Wailjj.

_ _ _ _.

1
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VOL. IX, No. 7.

ANN ARBOR, M[CH[GAN, OCTOBER 3, 1898.

FouR PAGES.

GVIW JI

T
H
E

FINE FALL SUITINGS.

T WE CARRY THE LARGEST
STOCK
IN THE CITY.
L 0 W
108 E. WASHINGTON ST.

T
H
E
T
A
L'
0
R

PRES. ANGELL'S ADDRESS. has traveled in many lands what a
great influence this Students' Chris-
Opening Meeting of the Students' tian Association has. There is hard-
ly a nation in which some men and
Christian Association, women from this association are not
An audience that cosi.'etely filled to be found. Of the six lady mis
Newberry Hall greeted IDr. Angell sionaries who were in China while I
yesterday morning upun tihe occasion was there five were from this Uni-
of his opening address to the Stu- versity and this association.''
dents' Christian Association. It has "There is one thing which I have
long been the custom for the presi- noticed sometimes on the part of
dent to address the association upon members of this association, namely,
the first Sunday morning aft 'r the they engage in the Christian work of
opening of college. Tradition has it, this college more from a sense of
however, that his remarks are in- duty than of pleasure. This I can
tended primarily for freshen and not understand. It seems'to me that
students of other classes sometimes every member of this association
feel above receiving the kindly ad- having such wonderful opportunities
vice which is usually given. for doing a noble work could not
Yesterday, however, was somewhat enter into it with anv but a feeling of
of an exception tlo the rule. The earnest enthusiasm".",
absence of Dr. Angell durinll last "With regard to the newcomers.
year made all the friends of the It is the desire of this association to
association articularly auxious to enlist every person in its work who

f You May Have +
Forgotten +
YOUR TOOTH BRUSH,
YOUR BLACKING BRUSH,
or YOUR WHISK-BROOM, .
f -OR-
The one you have"ay"be wonot,
+ndyou inalywat to relacit.ll * W
h~ave, them all in u.p-to-date style.
complete.
, WILDER'S PHARMACY
330 South state street.
DON'T FORGET
the OLD RELIABLE
House. Hot and cold lunches
at all hours. Chocolates and Ice
Cream Soda Water, Pipes, Cigars and
Tobacco, and full line of Smoking Sup-
plies. R. E. JOLLY & CO.
308 So. State Street.
HISTOLOGY,
BACTERIOLOGY,
PATHOLOGY.
Complete outfits even to
Knives and Scissors.
Our Price is Bottom.

a That purpose should not be a selfishs
- one, but a desire to 'Love thy God
- with all thy heart and all thy might
I and love thy neighbor as thyself.'"
t
AN EASY VICTORY.
- Michigan Defeats Normals in Satur-
day's Practice Game.
Michigan won the first scheduled
, game of the season Saturday after-
noon against the Ypsilanti Nrmal
by the score of 21 to 0. The game
I was for practice chiefly and the
t coaches played twenty-two different
nmen on the 'Varsity. As was ex-
s pected from the short time the men
t have been practicing. the work of
f the messin general was ragged and
slow. The first half was entirely in
Normal's territory. The new line
composed of new material entirely,
pexcept Bennett and Steckle, suc-
ceeded is lolding the Normals easily
while on the defensive, but did not
do much when Michigan had the-
bail. Neil Sanow pjlayes itastrng
gam for the 'Varsity at end ans
made many excellent tackles. Whit.
comb and Avery showed up well be-
hind the hale. Keena punted well
but missed one tackle. Cruse and
Gorton played the best game for the
Normals.
In the first half Normals kickofr
was returned 10 yards by Talcott.
Keena punted 31 yards, and Michi-
gan got the ball on downs on Nor-
mals' 40yard line. Avery made 20
yards around end, Steckle eight
more, and Avery bucked the center
for the first touchdown after three
minutes, Keena kicked goal. Avery
got the next kickoff and returned it
20 yards and Keena punted 2.5 more.
Snyder carried the ball 25 yards for
the Normals when it was lost to
Michigan on a fumble. Keena punt-
45 yards, Whitcomb bucked the line
for eight, and then went around the
end for 15 more, making the second
touchdown. Keena missed goal. On
the next kickoff Avery makes two
runs for 15 and 10 yards, when
Keena punts 35 yards and the ball
rolls behind Normals line where Snow
falls on it for the third touchdown.
Keena missed goal. The next kick
off is returned 12 yards by Kramer,
Keena punted 40 yards and time was
called with the score 16 to 0.
The second half saw many substi-
tutions and much poorer playing.
Blencoe missed a place kick from the
t 35 yard line. Weeks returned the
kickout to 40 yard line. Punted 30
yards and Michigan got the ball.
Weeks punted again for 25 yards.
Churchill returned it 20 yards. Snow
took the ball 10 yards, Weeks again.
punted 20, Malone gains five around
end where Michigan lost ball. Nor-
mals fumbled and Day fell on the
ball behind the line making the last
s touchdown. Talcott missed goal
The playing for the rest of the half
was very ragged and stayed near
Michigans 20 yard line until time
- was called.
vA ns TY . NO RMALS .
Car, Brown, Smith. c...........Vail
Kramer, Allen... r.g ..... Cruse
FranceOversmith.l.g.............Cross.
e Steckle, Day.......r. t...........Warner
.Continneds en Page 2.

PRESIDENT JAMES B, ANGELL.

I greet him at his first appearance be- has religious inclinations. Its spirit
CALKINS PHARMACY, fore them, consequently all classes is sympathetie, its infuence is help-
and all departments were well repre- ful. 'There are some who come here
sented at the opening meeting of the that feel after a long period of strict
year. surveillance they are entitled toa
Prof. D'Ooge read the lesson for moral vacation. There are some who
the morning and asked divine bless- from a sense of modesty, hesitate to
ing upon the work which the associa- make themselves known and thum
A UUAIN T Eution will undertake during the com- never engage actively in Christian
ing year. President tankin then work m the University. There are
Justam this ime we wanoto eesytm- introduced Dr. Angell, who spoke in some- who feel that the demands oh
dentmmo vs-ait osrBookstoreso whether
up town or down town, we want to part as follows: their studies must keep them from
geloacoquaited wishyoa and roite "It is with special pleasure that I religious work. There are some who
you Is matseorsoroes yousrendez.pesue ar-iims
voos.earoeaBookeers mc sohe aam able to be with you this mornmig. from desire keep away from religiou
UNOVERSISTY, and san offers pecial
low prices on second-hand books for Many times during the past year has influences and cultivate habits after.
eaIIyDeartment. Wanplaymy mind reverted to the pleasant ward to be greatly regretted. To al]
anted.Allinds of Second-hand farewell given me by your associa- I say that of all places, the Univer-
booksbaoght nd oold. tion before I left for my labors in sity is the best place to lead a relig.
1 J4 fj , distant lands. I was glad to hear ious life. Of all places, it is at the
upon my return of the noble work University where the three sides of
TWO STORES you accomplished during the year mlan's nature, the physical, the men.
Up Town Down Down and of your success in freeing the tal, and the moral, should be culti-
State St. Opp. Court House association of its standing debt." vated. It is here that some definite
Mlain Street "One can not appreciate unless he purpose in life should be formed.

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