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December 09, 1898 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1898-12-09

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2

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN DAILY.

Published Daily (Sundays excepted) during the
College year, at
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
'IeE: Theitlad hPres, Henning Block.
Bth Phnes 147.
MANAGING EDITOR.
F. EaaeLTARD, '01L.
BUSINESS MANAGER.
o. H. HANS, '00 L.
EDITORS.
Athletic Editor, T. R. WooDnow, '00 L.
P. W. JONES, '99, A. . MDOUGALL, '01 E,
F. D. EAxAN, '01 L, C. 1. LUND, '00 M,
G. D. aUDNUTT. '01 E.
The subscription price of the DAtY is $2.50 for
he college year, wila egular deliery hefree
noneth day. Ntice, eeommurnieatien, ad
other matter intended for rubliction must be
handedin atthe DALY otie before 8 p m., or
mailed to the editor before 3 p, m. of the day
previous to that on which they are expected to
p Iear.
Sceriptis may Ireftat tre DILY oice,
Meyer's, asritlese ewtad, cc with Brrsies
danager. subscribers will confer a favor by
reprtiug prmptly at this oetce any failure of
trniers t delier ater.
All changes in advertising[ satter must be in
the aiheby4p. ts.otre lay previous to thatl
on which tsey are to alpear.
IN CHARoEu o TODAY'S IssUe.
F. D. EAMAN.
It will be many years before the
University of Micihigan can appreci-
ate all that the recent gift of Fred-
erick Sterlns means. It was cer-
tainly not merely to satisfy men's
curiosity that Mr. Stearns donated
that invaluable collection of old
musical instruments. Few certainly
will ever hear the straiss of music
capable of being put forth from thosee
curious pieces of mechanism. It is
from the educational standpoint that
their value will be ultimately appre-
ciated. he student of archeology,
of drawing and painting, of history,
of literature or science who is so for-
tunate as to select Ann Arbor as his
place of study will go far and look
long and then in vais to find a re-
source of its nature equal to the one
which will soon find a home in our
museum.
The time for the annual and
lengthy discussion in the various
class meetings as to the necessity of
making the small contribution for
purehasing caps and sweaters for the
class football teams is at hand. As
usual, the number is large of those
who can not appreciate the bit of
philosophy, "It is more blessed to
give than to receive." But leaving
the philosophy of the class tax aside,
this question as to the support of
class teams touches a vital spot inr
college athletics. The gospel preached
by the supporters of college athletics
for years has been that the benefit
to be derived from college football
and baseball is not simply obtained
by the few who make up the 'Varsity
teams and reserves each year, but by
the many who have a chance to playy
on the several class teams. This
must not be lost sight of. Athletics
are for the many and not for the
few. Thse thousands of dollars spenrt
each year for the support of the
'Varsity teams is wrongly spent if it
does not result in encouraging ath-
letic sports generally among the
student body who n ed the benefit.
The experience of the past few years
has also shown that lcrss athletic
teams more than an any other thing
has kept alive class spirit. About
the only contests between classes in
which the classes as a whole are in-
terested are those on the athletic ield.
As a means, then, of keeping alive

class spirit and interest, the class
teams deserve support. Let the
little necessary encouragement of
class teams be cheerfully given.
Proflessor Kirchner Receives an
Oation.
On Wednesday, Prof. Kirchner
completed his course of lectures be-
fore the senior law class on Private
International Law and before the
freshman law class on Marital Rela-
tions At the close of his lecture in
the morning he gave the seniors, in a
neat address, several pieces of valu-
able advice. He urged especially
that the men going into practice from
the class of '99 would take with them
high moral and legal idea. "Never,"
said he, "should you let the interests
of your clients weigh more than your
own interests as honorable men. At
the conclusion of his lectures in the
afternoon, the freshman also were the
recipients of the professors best
wishes and some wholesome advice.
You are entered, he said, upon a pro-
fession that means a great deal of
hard work. Above all take care of
your bodies for you will never know
until you are actually in the midst of
a large practice what great demlands
there will be upon your physical en-
durance. Do your work faithfully
duriig the nine months of school and
when summer comes, throw you
books aside. Prof. Kirchner received
a hearty ovation from each of the
classes.
A Narrow Escape.
Several inquisitive studnts of the
Law Department came near getting
into trouble in the amphitheater of
the homeopathic medical building
last night. A post mortem in the
subject of pathology was being held
and tesenor medics aloe sere sup-
posed to be present. rThree lass,
however, were on hand to take in the
operations and found seats near the
top of the amphitheater.
They were recognized by some ac-
quaisted among the medics, who
immediately began circulating a
paper bearing the words "posmortem
on the laws in the top two rows after
the lecture."''The stended victims
suspici ned the trouble from afar and
made their escape just before the
demonstrator had finished his work.
The shops of the mechanical labo-
ratory of the University, are setting
up a turretted turnirg table, which
hen completed still ire worh $1,-
200 Thle designs swere tade by
Prof. C. G. Taylor, and all the work
is done n the shops.
Athens Theatre,I
DEC. 12--
Mr. Herbert Kelcey and
AMiss Effie Shannon inl
"The Mrth and the Flame."
DEC. 13--
Robert Morris in "Under
the Red Robe.''
UNIVERSITY
School of Danchig
Granger's Academy.
Ont Phrne 46.
YET' ANOTERl EKu sti De. t,
E J. La sElf the Palit, wil e
mainsoAss nAeror, 320 Eaar Lierty
St.ne has ect ery1husy. Housd15
tosl2aa m., l tori ad 7to155p.mu.

.va.+t.n .q . .*.+ EdP! !b!E3.eSn_ kh.v.+r.. ..x..v.x. m.r.. i .r.. r.. . . ss. .1 a.nw a.aa

r _

j-
WE ARE...
EXCLUSIVE
R; s AGENTS
FOR
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FINE
SHOES
BEAUSSHOE STO RE - 0.P. MAO sTREOT

IF YOU HAVE A
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t We have Gloves of every description-
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Wool, from 25c to $2.00.

C APS
Good warm ones, some not so
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Gloves make good Xmas pres-
ents.
NEW NECKWEAR SATURDAY.

t
M K
L RKEF n
M- El
A.

IMPORTERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF
CHEMICAL and PHYSICAL APPARATUS.
MICROSCOPIC FINDINGS. Headquarters for all Labora-
tory Supplies
112 S. Main Street, Ann Arbor, Mich.

TRY HOT CHOCOLATE,
None like it elsewhere.
200 EAST WASHINGTON STREET,
316 SOUTH STATE STREET.
The larsest arsortment of Candies in the city,
made hourly. Oysters served in any style.

_07.

If You Want Or Binding, or Ruling, or anything in our line, no matter
how small or 'how large,
a Job ofWE CAN DO IT
Printing for you. Call and get acquainted.
The Inland Press,
® ® i enning inoek.

Peninsular Engraving Co.,
Detroit,

IC~

SE rykmd.
ANDALL, , OAL.Every sEBLER,
B 119 West Washington Street
IState Phone 144. Both Phones, No. 108. Ann Arbor.
In Close 'PaceArAs
With the coming and going of the seasons are the fashions
in Shoes. The Styles of yesterday are soon forgotten in the desire for
that of to-morrow. See our windows for the best up-to-date line of
the styles for to-morrow.
R1RILVS SHOE STORE Ann Arbr.."

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