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May 27, 1895 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1895-05-27

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Of

Vow. V. No. 169. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, MONDAY, MAY 27, 1895. PRICE-THREE CENTS.

GAME WITH HARVARD.
MANAGER BAIRD ARRANGED
FOR ONE IN BOSTON.
'Varsity Football TeamWill Meet
Harvard Probably Nov. 2 or 9
Next- May Meet Pennsylvania
Also-Easy to Get Games for Next
Year.
Football Manager Charles Baird re-
turned home Satorday night from a
week's visit among the big eastern
universties where lhe had gone to ar-
range a football game for next fall.
He reports a very succsnsful trip and
a cordial welcome everywhere. By
our victory over Cornell last fall we
have secured a fist class standing in
the minds of easternt managers and
captalns, and Mr. Baird had no
trouble in securing all the gam s he
desired.
The first visit was made to the uni-
versity of P'ennsylvania, at Philadel-
phia. The captain of the U. of P.
team for next fall is a western man,
Mr. Carl Williams, who captaine d the
Oberlin team three years ago. Mr.
Willianis is very friendly towards
Mlichigan and expressed a desire to
meet our team next fall. Mr. Lea-
man, the manager, offered reasonable
terms, and a provisional game was
arranged, dependent upon the action
of the other universities in arranging
dates.
From Philadelphia Mr. Baird event
to Boston, where he met Manager
Rogers and Captain Brewer, of Har-
vard. The business management of
athletia at Harvard differs very much
from our system. There the question
of dates for games is left to the cap-
taIn and undergraduate manager,
while the fibancial arrangements are
left to a graduate manager, who is a
salaried officer and attends to all the
buesss of the different branches of
Captain Brewer was in favor of a
game with Michigan, and offered us
a. date with the following provisions,
as seen In the third section of the
contract: "The date of the game
shall be November 2 or November J,
Saturday; or October 31, Thursday,
the settlement of the exact date to
depend upon Harvard's arrangement
-with Yale, Princeton and Pensyl-
vania. (a) In case of a Yale-Harvard
game the date shall be October 31.
,.b) In case of a Princeton-Harvard
game the date shall be November 2.
(c) I. case of neither a Yale nor
Priacwton game the date shall be
Noveembern 9."
After discussing the question of
dates, Pr. Baird wielt to New York,
'where he met Mr. Fred W. Moor",

the gradtate manager, and compleie
final arrangemients for the game. The
terms agreed upon are liberal, andI
everything was arrnged to the satis-
faetion of both sides.
Mr. Baird also spent a day at Yale
in order to find out the sentiment
there in regard to a. Yale-Harvard
game next fall. iroiii opinions gath-
cred from students at Yale and Har-
yard and among the alunimni in New
Yoik,, he believes a Yale-Harvard
gime- for next fall is very impiobable,
so that Michigan will undoubtedly
meet Harvard on Soldier's Field in
Boston, November 2 or 9. As there
has been nothing done towards ar-
ranging a larvard-Princeton galne, it
is not unlikely that Michigan will
play Harvard November t .The erat
date will not be known until the
above universities make a final settle-
iient as to dates. In case of a. Mic-
iga-Pennsylvania game, the date will
probably be November- l.
Michigan s great success of last fall
has made other teams very anxious
to meet her, and applications for
games have been received from nearly
every piroiinent team in the Missis-
sippi valley.
'Varsity Track Athletes.
California. has made eleve n entries
in the Western Intercollegiate ehalup-
ionships at Chicago Saturday and will
go there from New York, returning to
Ann Arbor for the meeting with us
Juno >. According to the new rule of
the Athletic association, only one who
mcakes a point in in intercoiligite
will hoeCentitrd. to wear the 'varity
"M" or vote for captain. Those who
go to Chicago this week will be given
white suits with "M. T. A." in blue on
the jersey. Then for those who win a
place at Chicago or against California
these letters will be taken off, and a
blue sash substituted with a yellow
'varsity "IM" on it.
Lectures on Ibsen.
Prof. Calvin Thomas has very kind-
ly offered to give three lectures on
Ibsen for the benefit of the w onlans
gymnasium. Last year he gave a
course of five lectures oii the same
subject, which were enthusiastically
attended and much enjoyed. The
three now in prospect continue the
previous course, and will be given
June 4, 11 and 13 at 7:15 p. m. in
Tappan Hall. Course tickets will be
sold at 50 cents and single admission
will be 25 cents.
Newell ,will coach Coroell's football
team next fall until November 10. and
will return for a few days if a Thanks-
giving Day game is arranged.

MICHIGAN LOSES.
LAST GAME OF THE WESTERN
TRIP WENT TO CHICAGO.
Sexton Not in Good Shape for the
Game.- Chicago Does Some
.Heavy Batting.-Holmes Behind
the Bat Again-Score 13 to 1.
lichigan lost her first Nveetern game
Saturday to Chicago by a score of 1
to 13. The size of the score is a dise
appointoient, for we expected a. hard
game, with the chances in our favor.
Most of Chicago's runs were made
in the first three innings, while Sex-
ton was in the box for Michigan. He
had been unwilling to go into the'
game, not feeling well, but finally did
so. Ite allowed eight runs in the first
,hr'e innings, two home runs, a triple
and three singles being made off
hiim. Although Watkins pitched
against Beloit on Friday, he did good
work after relieving Sexton in the
third, and had he been put in at the
beginning the result might have been
different. The disastrous first three.
innings seemed to take the conlideice
out of the men, but the hard trip
last week had completely fagged them
and deprived them of all snap. This
explains why thirteen Michigan min
were left on bases.
Chicago at once claims the champ-
ionship of the West, which is a trifle
premature. Michigan is to try her
again on the home grounds; and if
Chicago is again victorious, perhaps
she may justly consider herself at
the head, but not till then.
The first ball pitched by Sexton
was driven by Nichols inito right field,
and a wild throw by Watkins let him
reach first. A wild pitch, Jones' sac-
rifice, a passed ball, and Chicago had
scored the first run. Watkins muffed
Abells' fly. Adkinson lit safely and
Clarke brought both in with a hoe
.run. Sexton made a hit for Michigan,
stole second, got to third on an error,
and came loe on a sacrifice. That
was the end of Michigan's run-getting.
Hering started the second inning
with a hit and Nichols brought himi
home with a home run. The carnage
began again in the third. Adknson
drove the ball over to the running
track for three bases and then Sexton
retired. Watkins toor his place and
the first two batsmen made a double
and a single, netting two runs. In
the fifth inning, with two out, Bering
got a base and Grant was safe on
Bloomingston's error. Nichols brought
iering il 'on a hit and stole second,
while Grant came home on the at-
tempt to put Nichols out. The latter
stole third and came in on Jonesl'
two-bagger.
In the fifth inning, with but one
(Coiitlnued on second page.)

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