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April 02, 1895 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1895-04-02

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VOL V,. No.- 132. I11hUVERSLTY OF MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, APRIL 2, 1895. PRICE-THREE CENTS.

CHARLES BAIRD RETURNED
'THE ALUMNAL BANQUET AT CH I-
CAGO AND FOOTBALL MEETING.
A.' A;'Stgg Representative to the
Eastern Convention.-Proposed
Changes In.Football Rules-Reso-
.lelbna on the Great Colege Sport.
Charles )aird returne d yesterday
from Evanston and Chicago, where,
he was sent AS thedelegate of the
Athletic association. Mr. Baird spoke
enthusiastically of the Chicago Alumni
assotlation banquet Saturday, whre
he repaoaded to the toast on "Ath-
letics.' He said that Presi'dent
Adams, of Wisconsin, in speaking of
football, said lie "would far rather
see ,football played with its present
abuses than to see it abolished."
Mr. Baird regarded the meeting of
western college football men at Evans-
ton as of little importance. Repre-
sentatives were present from Minnu.-
sota, Lake Forest, Beloit, Northwest'
ern, Chicago, Wisconsin and Michi-
gan. Football reforms were discussed
Friday and Saturday, and it was de-
cided to send A. A. Stagg as repre-
sentative of the different colleges in
the convention to the meeting to bo
called in the East for revision of the
football rules. Wisconsin and Michi-
gan refused to concur in the action
the couerehme took, on the ground
'that the meeting was not one of the
representative football colleges of the
West and because there seemed to be
no authority back of the represent-
fives.
The proposed changes in the football
rules recommended by the eonfereneo
:are as follows:
"There shall be two umpires and
-one refereecontrolling the game. The
referee is empowered to call a foul tn
ease of a violation of the rules which
Is not seen by the umpires.
"The side making a fair catch shall
be given fivo yfds, and from that
place shall shve the option of a free
kick or a down, provided that suet
-fair catch is not made within twenty
five yards of the opponents' goal. Th
player attempting such fair catcl
shall call out 'Fair catch,' and if in
terfered wi or tackled whie mak
ing the attempt shall be givn twenty
'de yardt
"A substitute for each team shal
act as linesman, and shall use a lin
five yards in length.
"The side missing a try at goal shal
have option of taking the ball or not
"Whenever a side has tried a drol
kick at the goal upon the first dowi
Inside thetwenty-five yard line an
thef result has been a touch-back, th-
'line of kick-out shall be the fifteen
yard line."
The foowifig resolutions were a1si
adopted:
"Whereas, We sincerely egred-tha
thl upnwarritMe rougpss. f a fei
1oathall tema last fall gave occdiowe
fo,- Ju - seionp agitoatloa among-aes

oral colleges in regard to the advisa-
bility of abolishing the game of foot-
ball from the'college campus; and,
"Whereas, We regret that to some
extent football is regarded as a brutal
game by the general public; therefore,
be it
"ie olved, That we sincerely believe
the game of football to be an excellent
form of physical exercise which legi-
timately belongs to the college campus.
Further be it
"Resolved, That we do not believe
that brutality is a necessary incident
to the game, but is due to a lack of
proper discipline. But it further
"Resolved, That. we believe that the
style of play depends in a great meas-
ure upon the captains and coachers of
the different teams, and that it is thl
unanimous sentiment of -the confer-
'nco that all kinds otf intentionltrough-
ness and brutality be strongly con-
demned and discountendnced on our
respective college grounds. Be it also
"Rlesolved, That the practice of
playing coaches and non-bonafide stu-
dents or students of inferior grade of
scholarship be entirely discontinued,
and that we call upon the assistance
of our respective college faculties and
student bodies to execute these resolu-'
tions."'
ASSOCIATION ON SOCIETIES?
Who Is to Control Intercollegiate
Debates.
The.action of the Oratorical associa-
tion in endeavoring to get control of
the intercollegiate debate has created
a. stir in the societies that it would
affect. The societies wo have had
control of this annual contest, and to
wlhom, if to anyone, credit is due for
success attained In the past are the
Adelphli, the Alpha Nu, the ester,
and the Teffersonian; and it seems
as if decided opposition will be made
to any such move as that proposed
by the Oratorical association.
The Adelphi at their last meeting
took a decided stand on the question
and instructed the person sent to place
1 the matter before them and report
t back to the association, which holds

i I

A SUMMER IN PARIS.
MR. MORITZ LEVI SPEAKS. BE-
FORE THE UNITY CLUB.
The Gay French Capital Described
A Parisian Street a Perpetual Mu-
seum-The "Latin Quarter."
One of the brightest papers given in
Ann Arbor this year was that read
by Mr. Levi at Unity club last even-
ing. It was full of humorous turns
and at the same time showed a
'acquaintance with Paris that ferw Am-
ericans ever acquire.
Paris, he says, is one of the most.
interesting cities in the world. Every-
thing is alive and the people seem to
have the art of getting the most
pleasure possible out of life. A 'aris"
street is a veritable museum, with
its street venders; companies of sol-
diers, brass bands, street corner jug-
glers, men with performing animals,
and everything else that the best lim-
agination could picture. Boys and
men run about with papers and wo-
men have newstands at the corners.
Along the banks of the Seine are the
old and second hand book stalls where
thousands of books are piled up for
sale at a surprisingly low figure.
The Latin or Students' Quarter is
perhaps the moat full of int-rest for
us. This is the traditional home of
Parisian and indeed French learning.
Almost all the great names of France
have been connected with it, and the
same might be said for the present
time. The Parisian students are
happy and careless, enjoying nothing
more than a practical joke and in-
dulged by the police to a considerable
degree. Riots, however, are of rare
occurrence.
FOR BALL AND TRACK TEAMS.
A Benefit Entertainment to be Giv-
en by a Club of University Stud-
ents.

NO 6000 STUDENT
Tries to learn without books.
Some people though try to use
musical instruments with little
or no ton
r ne Say uy Ihose hi h Ha lon e.
We sell that kind.
13South 'Main 8t.
FASHIONABLE TAILORING
Elegant Graduating or light Suit
made from Imported or Finest
for $22.00 and up, Full Dress Suit
$27.00, work mpade at home bears
inspection by any high Class
Tailor and Cutter. Will be
pleased to have yncall and be
convinced.
JOS. W. KOLLAUF,
10 E.Washington st., up stairs.
HOT LUNCTHEBS
FRESH LINE OF
LOWNEY'S CHOCOLATES
JUST RECEIVED AT
. TUTTLE'S,
$ 48 . STATE ST.
Go to RANDALL for
Artistic Photos.
NEW GALLERY.
LARGES OPERAING BOOM IN SAE
NO. 15 WASHINGTON BLOCK,
Ann Arbor, Mich.
ED. A. CADIBUX.
PRORIETO OF THE
Latest Improved Barber Shop
In the city. E. Washington st., Ist door
east of Main st. Ann Arbor.
MAMMOTH PIPE SALE
JOLLY & CO'S
26 Sour STATE ST. Don't fail to come-
Hot andC ld Lunches at All Hours.
PROF. JOHNSON'S
Illustrative Cases on
Bills and Notes
AND
NORTON ON BILLS AND NOTES
NOW ON SALE AT
Up Town, Down Town
-UniveraltyBookstore, Oppositeourrise
Z0.e8,sBate t. 4N.Maln St
ANN ARBOR

its annual election tonight, that the-
Adelphi would not enter into such A U. of M. Dramatic club has been
an agreement. organized and will give an entertain-
In the first place, the claim was ment in the opera house, May 1U, for
made by the Adelphi, that they Orator- the benefit of the baseball and track
teal association illedd its sphere in teams. The club has been at work
taking care of the annual e ratorical for three weeks In the preparation of
contest; that no member of the Uni- two plays, "Lend me Five Shillings,"
versity was barred from enterIng and "Woodcock's Little Game," the
these contests, as membership in any first of which is a one act farce and
one of the four societies would give the second a comedy in two acts.
a student the right to contest. The The following persons will appear
societies had conceived the idea, in in the casts: Misses B. Dunster,
the beginning, of such a contest; had Anna Dunster and Duffy, Mrs. Matti-
conducted it yearly to the satisfaction son, Nessrs. Hackett, F. W. B. Cole
of all concerned; and, so far as the son, A. H , . W. B. Cole
Adelphi was coneerned, 'eati to hold man, A. Smit, W. Mosley, B.-Boor
their grip on its. ianagenient, and land, C. Harriman, B. Cocke, J.
not turnov'r 'ithe control of every- handy, Nightingale and S. Babcock.
ti in- tiila ietothe Oratr'ial
asseca ', 'he mtr will. be The enier laws held a meeting yes
ugh- -b r ethe associa'tin to. tnrday marning and decidA on :' Mr.
-nigh n a t.-uit-glttIasoautlcipated. Rafhtll''a 'e4tias- photographer.

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