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March 19, 1895 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1895-03-19

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*1.

PRICE-THREE CENTS.

VOL. V. No. 120.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, MARCH 19, 1895.

i i

INGERSOLL INTERVIEWED.
DAILY REPORTER TALKS WITH
INGERSOLL AT COOK HOUSE.
Sectarian Schools a Menace-Prac-
tice Court a Grand Thing-Com-
pulsory Education Endorsed-May
Come Here Feb. 22. 1896.
The Daily reporter had a pleasant
chat with Cel. Robert G. Ingersoll at
his room in the Cook house yesterday
afternoon. The colonel's daughter ac-

dents wanted me I wouid make m
effort to satisfy their wishes. You
know I am here today, there tomor-
row and can't make and definite ar-
rangements a few weeks ahead."
Col. Ingersoll is affable and pleats-
ing as a talker. Ite is what might ba
termed a fine conversationalist. Al-
though busy when the Daily reporter
called het gave himself up to the to
many people unpleasant task of being
interviewed with a good grace that
took the Daily man by storm.

rompanied him on this trip as she does J
on most of his trips. The journey .T

from his home did nat seem to have
wearied Col. Ingersoll much though
his hair is white and his vigorous
manhood is commencing to show the
assaults of old age.
Int response to a question as to un-
versities in general and Michigan in
particular the colonel said: "I iuow
nothing, almost absolutely nothing, of
university and college work," adding
with a merry twinkle of his eye, "I
would be glad to tell you that. In
your law school work though, I see
much greater benefit to the student
fron office study." Later, however,
when the practice court work was ex-
plained, he said, "The value of such
work cannot be over-estimated; to
plead and plead well is the first thing
that a law school or an office should
teach .the student, and if as you say
theory is thus woven into practice
legal education has attained a high
stage of development."
The colonel also said, "I regard
sectarian schools as a blight and a
menace to American liberty, our hope
as a nation rests with the schools un-
der governmental control; that is the
common schools and the state univev.
sities. A pational university would be
:a good thing."
My views on the Bible as a work of
literature are not as glowing as those
of my Christian friends yet I see no
harm in the use of certain portions of
the book, say like Ecclesiastes or The
Song of Solomon, in literary study in
schools and universities run by funds
from the ,taxpayers' pockets."
"Michigan, from the little I know.
hasn't paid very much for her state
university, though I have not seen
enough of it to give very much weight
to any opinion. Education is the foe
of superstition and I heartily believe
in it. Compulsory education even to
the higher institutions of learning
would be a great factor in the au-
vancement of the U'nited States as a
force among .governments."
Col." Ingersoll said when asked by
the Daily man if he would be willing
to come here if invited on Feb. 22,
1896.. "It's hard telling where I will
be then, you know,.bnt if the law stu-

A DISCUSSION OF "BIBLE STUDY
FOR PERSONAL GROWTH."
Reapons for Systematic Study by
Students-A Conversation With
Dr. Drummond.
Mr. J. R. Mott delivered his third
address last evening in Newberry hall
and took as his subject "Bible study
for personal growth." He urged the
necessity of coiineiiing this study
while in college and gave several prac-
tical reasons and illustrations why this
should be done.' The first ieason was
that college is pro-eminently the place
to establisi personal study of the
Bible. The second reaoon given was
that while we are studying other sub-
jects the Bible should not be neglected.
As another reason, Mr. Mott said it
was absolutely essiential for the pro-
motion of a student's spiritual life,
and again it is necessary for the prep-
aration of one for Christian work.
In speaking of a conversation which
he had with air. Drummond the speak-
er said he asked him if he would name
three subjects for Christian study
among students; after a moment's re-
fIlection Mr. Drummond replied: (1) the
study of Christ, (2) the study of Christ,
and (3) the study of Christ I nelosing
the speaker said let the time of study
be regular, let it be daily and unhur-
ried and let it be the choicest thme of
the day.
Lake Forest Wins at Chicago.
The triangular indoor athletic meet
between the University of Chicago,
Lake Forest and Northwestern oc-
curred Saturday evening in the gym-
nasium of the first mentioned institu-
tion, and was won by Lalte Forest.
The contest between Chicago and
Lake Forest were particularly close, as
had- been expected, while on- aeount
of the narrowness of the running track
Northwestern did not take part in the
relay race and the half-iile run.
The standing of the three, coRnpeti-
tors was as follows: Firsts, Lake For-
est, 2; Chiesgo,:.20; Northwestern, 5;
seconds, Lake Forest, 8, Chicago, 8;
Northwestern, 4; thirds, Lake Forest
1; Chicago, 3;. Northwestern 3.

BOXING FOR POINTS.
ALLOWED BY THE BOARD OF
CONTROL.
Events to be Controlled by the
Rules of the A. A. U.-Contest in
the Hands of Dr. Fitzgerald.
At the meeting of the board of con-
trol last night it was decided to allow
scientific boxing for points in the tan
nual indoor meet, which will te- held
in the gymnasium Friday evening
Barch 29. There will accordingly
be four classes in boxing, the same as
in wrestling, as follows: Over 158
lbs., heavyweight; 158 lbs. and tinder
middle weight; 143 tbs. and under
lightweight; 122 lbs. and under, feath-
er weight. A. A. U. rules will govern
both wrestling and boxing contests,
and iitercollegiatettrules will be fol-
lowed it the other events.
About a week after the 'varsity in-
door meet, Saturday, April 6, the con-
test for the faculty cup for the best
all around gymnastics will be held.
The board of control last night placed
the contest in the hands of Dr. Fitz-
gerald. Drs. Nanrede and Fitzgerald
were appointed a committee to ar-
xraoge for judges for the contest.
Rules governing these various contests
will be published in a day or two.
More on the Medical School.
A resolution was adopted by the
Practitioners' club, of Detroit, at a
ineeting held last night favoring the
removal of the Homeopathic depart-
ment from Ann Arbor to Detroit, and
its connection with Grace hospital of
that city.
Dr. Charles S. Morley, in an address
before the club, said that the new
paper reports of the recent homeo-
pathic meeting at Lansing were incor-
rect. The iceting appointed a con-
mittee composed of doctors opposed to
Dr. Obetz and those favoring his plan,
Dr. Morley said, and this committec
went to Lansing, where the plans of
removing the ltomteopathic depart-
ment was advocated before a legisla-
tive committee.
Members of Athletic Association.
In a few days the Daily will print
a list of all the members of the Ath-
letic association so far as Treasurer
Prentiss has them. This list will de-
ride who has the right to vote at the
annual meeting of the association,
April 6. In making out the lists some
names have been' undoubtedly omitted
or lost, and Mr. Prentiss wishes all
holders of tickets not mentioned In
the list published to report to him at
ence In order to Inure them a right
to vote at thegelection.
Subscribe for the Daily.

NO GOOD STUDENT.
Tries to learn without books.
Some people though try to use
musical instruments with little
or no tone.
We Say Buy Those Which Hae lope
We sell that kind.
51 South Main st.
STU DENTS
Why wear hand-me-downs
PANTS
When you get them made to your
measure for
$3.25
and up, by a practical tailor here at
home? All work done in Ann
Arbor. Suits pressed 60 cents.
JOS. W. HOLLA17&',
10 E. washiniton St.
HEOT ITU1C-U C EJ-1ES
FREsII LINE OF
LOWNEY'S CHOCOLATES
JUST RECEIVED AT
$ TUTTLE'S,
1 48 S. STATE ST.
Go to RANDALL for
Artistic Photos.
NEW GALLERY.
LARGEST OPERATING BOOM IN STATE
NO. 15 WASHINGTON BLOCK
Ann Arbor, Mich.
ED. A. CADIBUX
Latest Improved Barber Shop
In the city. E. Washingon St., 1st door
east of Main st. An Arbor.
MAMMOTH PIPE SALE
JOLL1Y &Co's
2W SOUTHS STATE St. Don't fail to come.
Hot and Cold Lunches at All Hours.
Heard's
Criminal
Pleading
NOW ON SALE AT
Uavershtyhbokestore OppslteoCurtSouse
2- 1. Sate BO. 4N.IhaIaSt
ANN ARBOR-

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