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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board of Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law.

January 20, 1896 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1896-01-20

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the . o

Al. l
ONDAY, JANUARY 20, 1896. FouR PAGES-3 CENTS.

VOL. VI. No..78.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, M

ONE GUITAR
Is enough for one person to
play on at one time. One
guitar is not enough, how-
ever, to supply 3,000 stu-
dents. That's why we have
constantly in stock several
dozens of guitars of various
makes and prices.
BETTER LOOK AT OUR
U. OF M. GUITAR.
It's good as its name.
THE ANN ARBOR ORGAN CO
S. MAIN ST.
For a Stylish
FULL DRESS OR TUXEDO
CALL ON
Jos. W. Kllauf
Merchant Tailor,
Strictly high grade work at
moderate prices.
10 E. Washington St.
2d Semester.
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF DANCING
Opposite LAW building.
TERMS $5 FOR THE REST OF THE YEAR,
TakeNotice.
In order to reduce my stock of
Fall Woolens, I will offer all Fancy
Suitings at cost for cash and nake
room for Spring Importations.
An early call will profit you. At
G. H. WILD,
The Leading Tailor,
2 E. Washington Si, Near Main..
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN.
ILLUSTRATIVE CASES
-ON-
PERSONAL PROPERTY,
Selected by Prof. Levi T.
Griffin, of the Law Depart-
ment,
NOW ON SALE
-AT-
WAH R'S,
UpTown, Down Town,
Universit Bookstore, Opposite Court House
2SS. ateSt. 4N.Main St.
Advertise in the Daily

TILE FRATERNITY WAR.
STATEMENT FROM THOSE DE-
NIED REPRESENTATION.
Strong Fight to Be Made Before
the Regents at Wednesday's Meet-
ing-Some of the Reasons Why
the Petition is Being Made.
The following statement has beens
given out by the fraterities who are
denied representation in the manage-
ment of the annual ball:
The interest in the inter-fraternity
social war in becoming more intense
as the day for the meeting of the
Board of Regents approaches. It may
seem strange to many that ithe
Regeints should have anything to do
with a dance at the University, and it
was not until the Junior Iiop was
transferred from an old rink down
town to the new Waterman gymhnasiusi
that the Regents have become an im-
portait factor in college social affairs.
The dispute is very simple. Nine of
the thirteen active literary fraternities
have exclusive control and fhose fra-
teriies which have been established
since 1876 have repeatedly been re-
fused any participaton in the affairs
at. all, except under such restricted
conditions as have made a disintion
most decidedly marked.
The fraterities excluded are second
in no way in point of loeal strength
or national organization to those repre -
sented. The result of a social line
thus arbitrarily drawn are easily
seen. A very bitter spirit has been
engendered, not only between the two
fraternity factions, but also between
those giving the annual ball and the
independents, a thing most detriment-
al to the college spirit. An element
of exclusiveness in a state university
asllowed to flourish by the sanction of
the Regents and the granting of the
use of the gymnasium has long been
felt intolerant.
'ie remedy is wihin the reas of
the Board of Regents, and a perpetua-
tion of such an iniquity is contrary to
the democratie spirit upon which the
University of Michigan was founded.
The fraternities on the aggres-
sive say they propose to agitate the
matter every year before the Regents
until they secure the rights to which
they are entitled.
Failed for the Fifth Time.
Five attempts and still no election of
president is the record of the first year
law cass. Saturday morning the '98
L class met for the fifth time in the
law lecture room and after adding five
unsuccessful ballots for president to
their already long list they adjourned
withiut an election. It was not for

lack of a majority, however, that this
meeting was a failure for on the fifth
ballot T. A. Berkible, the western cas-
didate, received s imajority of the votes
east, but there having been but 112
cast while their constitution provihihs
that 122 shall be neceseary to elect oli- -
cers, no election was declared. The
only other business performed was the
selection of F. G. Mason for the class
member of the board of the Oratorical
Association and authorizing te chair-
man to appoint a committee to select
Ia class yell. Another class meeting
will probably be called some day thisis
week after the afternoon lectures.
PRES, ANGELL'S ADDRESS.
Speaks on Christianity at New
Church Dedication.
The new Bethlehem lvaingeical
church, on South Fourth avenue was
dedicated yesterday, the event being
observed by special services in both
morning and eveniu. Several di-
vines from outside the city assisted i
tle ceremony and in the evening the
address in Einglish was dehvered by
Prof. Angell. It was a large crowd
that greeted the President at the new
church. The building was beautifully
decorated with potted plants and long
before 7 o'clock pople began to gather
for' liheeveninigladdress. Iresdent
Angell spoke of the advancement 11f
Christianity, its marvelous work and
the many laurels the great Christian
religion has won. le spoke for in
hour and after a beautiful selection
from the choir the great erovd was
dismissed and the ceremonies of ded-
icating the new Bethlehem church iha
been completed.
Mr. Dow on History.
Mr. Dow gave an interesting talk be-
fore the Alpha Nu Society Saturday
night. He spoke on the advisability of
commencing the study of history at an
earlier age than at present, and of pur-
suing it from the grammar schools up
with special attention to the various
institutions which have grown op1
around us. Ile also outlined the meth-
ods of historical instruction in France
aid Germany, whese this system is
used.
The Voting Contest.
LODEn-OAvS MACHINE TOOL CO.,.
Cincinnati, 0:
I cast my vote for the University of
Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich., in the con-
lest for the $100 lathe, which yea offer
to present on March. 5, 195 to the techni-
cal school receiving the greatest number
of votes.
Voters Full Name------..............---- -
Street No----..........................
City----...-.....-.-State...-...-.
(Voters must be at least fifteen years
old. Ladies cannot vote but may aid in
securing votes.

HARD AT WORK.
Committee Is Raising Money for
the Woman's Gymnasium.
The executive and advisory boards
of the Woman's League met Saturday,
January 18, with Miss Averil, 13 Mon-
roe street. Reports were made by the
varios couittees, and plans in the
interest of the womans gymnasium
were discussed.
Througis the efforts ana generosity
of Miss Ayeril, chairman of the bule-
tin committee, a blackboard has been
placed in the girls reading room, upon
which will be recorded daily brief
summaries of current events, to be
supplemented by three or for of the
best newsapers found also in the
readng room. This will supply si log
felt need of college women.
A vote of thanks wsy extendsed to
the editors of the U. of M. Daily for
placing a copy of their paper on the
reading room table. It is hoped that
other Ann Arbor papers will follow
their good example.
As a means for raising money for
the womaa's gymnasium it was de-
eided that the "Jarley Wax Works" be
given under the diregtjos of Miss
McCobb, who has undertaken the
saume entertainment in Detroit, Ypsi-
lani and other surrounding cities and
in the east with much succees. This
plan seemed especially feasible to the
executive and advisory boards and al-
so to a committee of young men who
met at Mrs. Angell's to discuss seth-
ods of raising money with the gym-
nasium committee, in as much as it
would reach and interest the greatest
number of people in the surest and
most direct way. Arrangements for
the entertainment were left to an ad-
visory committee consisting of Mrs.
Lombard as chairman, Miss Soule,
Mrs. Morris, Miss Bates and Miss
Stickney.
THE GERMAN CLASSICS.
New Series in the English Text to
Be Issued.
With the aim of giving to igh
School students an English text of
the German classics, a new series of
books is being issued by the Boston
publishing house of Silver, Burdett &
Co., the editing of which has been in
the hands of Miss Euretta A. Ioyles.
The first volume takes up Lessing.
There is a brief introduction by WiI-
helm Bernhardt, and an essay on the
life and writings of the author by Miss
Hoyles, whic'h shows -a thorough study
of her subject. The text given is
"Nathan the Wise," translated by Wil-
liam Taylor. This volume will be
closely followed by volumes on Goethe
and Schiler.

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