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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board of Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law.

October 05, 1895 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1895-10-05

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VOL. VI. No. 4 1p UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 5 1895. FOUR PAGES-$ CENTS.

ONE GUITAR
Is enough for one person to
play on at one time. One
guitar is not enough, how-
ever, to supply 3,000 stu-
dents. That's why we have
constantly in stock several
dozens of guitars of various t
makes and prices.
BETTER LOOK AT OUR
U.OF M GUITAR.
It's good as its name.
THE ANN ARBOR ORGAN CO,
S. MAIN ST.
STUDENTS!
IF YOU WANT
Bargains
Books
CALL AT THE
STUDENTS'_BOOKSTORE
Law and Medical Books, Greek
Latin. Mathematical and all Col-
lege Text Books at reduced rates
to'students. Drawing Instruments
and Engineers' Supplies.
WE SELL THE BEST AND
CHEAPEST FOUNTAIN PEN
MADE.'
SHEEHAN & CO..
STATE STREET.
-. GILD,
THE LEADING TAILOR
AND IMPORTER.
The latest and most Fashionable
Foreign Fabrics for Men's Wear.
The Largest Stock in the City..
N0. 2 E. WASHINSTON ST., NEAR MAIN.
W11LD.
WE HAVE WHAIO YU WANT,
We can meet your needs in the
way of text-books, supplies, etc., no
natter what your class or depart-
ment,at either of our stores, and we
have the right kind at the right
price. Bring around a list of your
wants; a trial purchase is the best
indicator as to where you should
trade all the year.
We buy, sell and exchange second-
band books in large quantities, and
can offer you special bargains in
this line. We are sole agents for
the celebrated Wateman fountain
pen-everyone. guaranteei You'll
also find the besttnivrsity Station-
ery, Note Books, Drafting Supplies,
Sweaters, etc., at special rates at
W A H R'S.
Up Town Down Town.
Univer-ity Booktore, Opposite CourtHouse
20S.State St 4 N. Maisl St.

FOR UNITY AND STRENGTH
GLORIOUS MASS MEETING AT
UNIVERSITY HALL.
Many Excellent Speeches Arouse
Great Enthusiasm-The Proper
College Spirit Predominates -
Contributions Excellent.
About 800 students turned out last
tight to the mass meeting in Univer-
sity Hall and much enthusiasm was
manifested. The alumni from out of
town were not on hand, Messrs. Haw-
ley and Bates telegraphing that they
were detained by law suits; but the
local speakers were equal to the occa-
Sion.
Prof. J. C. Knowlton, who presided,
opened the program with a plea for
pure athletics. He told of the har-
mony existing at present between the
faculty and students as to the man-
agement of athletics.
Football Manager Charles Baird fol-
lowed with a brief exposition of the
way athletics are managed and a
statement of the needs of football at
present.
Mr. Baird was followed by Coach
McCauley, Pres. J. H. Prentiss, Dr.
Nancrede, Prof. Rolfe and E. C.
Shields. Mr. McCauley made a stir-
ring address in behalf of loyalUniver-
sity spirit to back the, team for. a vic-
tory over Harvard. Prof. Rolfe told
of witnessing the playing of the Har-
vard eleven a few days since and said
he did not consider it as good as
should be expected. Dr. Nancrede's
effective speech was closed by a still
more effective donation of $25.
While Mr. Shields was still speaking
the Athletic Association directors were
passing through the crowd with ub-
scription tblaus atd menbership tick-
ets. Harry Weinstein's offer to give
$20 if nine others would do the same,
brought responses from Prof. Rolfe,
Secretary Wade and Prof. Knowlton
amid great applause. The list of ten
was soon completed.
The sum subscribed at the meeting
was nearly $500, and the athletic tick-
ets sold and cash subscriptions make it
nearly $600.
The Ladies' Gymnasium.
Committees have been appointed to
co-operate with the Detroit alumnae
in coliciting contributions for the wo-*
men's gymnasium. This cnniittee
consisting of ladies and undergrad-,
nates, will visit Detroit soon and it is
expected that their efforts will. be
amply rewarded. In the meantime it
is hoped that all students who have
not already done so will make dona-
tions to the fund; and those who have
already subscribed are eansestly re-
quested to pay their subscriptions at
once.
The young women are anxious to
have their own gymnasium and the
young men are especially desirous to
have their building for themselves all
alone. There was never more enthusi-
asm over the matter, and if the men
and women will heartily co-opeate
another year will see the woman's
gymnasium ready for use.
Rooms at 26 E. Jefferson street.

YESTERDAY'S PRACTICE. GRAND LECTURE COURSE.
Michigan's Men Showing Up Well
In Practice Games. SENATOR DAVID B. HILL AND

After the usual punting and signal
practice yesterday the teams played
about as follows:
'VARSITY. RESERVES.
Tryon--- i.-..-.----left end--. -.Drumheller
Villa..-- i......._eft tackle----..Johnson
hailes..............left guard..------Johnson
Car -.......-..-..-...center--.....S..Myers
Henninger-----e.right geard,...Waumbacher
Yont.-.......right tackle..-..--Dicken
Hutchinson- right end....-_.Oreenleaf
Holmes.--------.m.uarter..-.. u.t--- tD y
Hollister..-...-.....right half...--..'..-Palm er
Gates_.- l..---.-eft half -.-...-...-.Vernon
Bloomingston-...afull back..........O.sPont
The reserves held up their end in
good shape and it was almost impossi-
ble for tile 'Varsity to niks holes in
the left side of their line. The two
Johnsons did not have many chances
to go through the opposite line and
did notfellow their interference well,
but they bucked Henninger and Yont
very successfully. Carr had little
trouble in going through Mey-
ers, but the strong man got
in some good work nevertheless.
Bloomingston played full back in good
shape and punted extremely well.
Hutchinson played his end well and
was very efficient in breaking up in-
terference. Gates played his half in
good shape as did Hollister.
For the reserves Palmer played an
excellent game and broke through the
line time and again. Bryant also
played well and followed his inter-
ference, making a long run half way
down the field before he was stopped.
Smith was given a trial at fall back
and played his position well except for
his tackling which was rather weak.
Several other men were given trials
and most of them showed up pretty
well. A signal quiz was held at the
training table last night in preparation
for today's game.
THE GAME TODAY.
How the Teams Will Line Up for
the Coming Game.
The game with the Michigan Mill-
taryi Academy will begin this after-
noon at 2:30. The teams will line up
as follows:
MICHIGAN M. M. A.
Grenleaf- --left sd--_--_-towilg
Villa -----left tackle----Conesr
Raikes------ left guard- Reaney
Care. - rs_______cn~r.---- _..Lincoln
..eneinerrightguard. -MKEas
Vnt__---- rigut tckls-H--. Snd
Huticinsn-rght end- Davidson
Holmes.-r..........quarter-- zBrroughs
Serert - si__-._eft ,ait---_-- odrich
Hollister.------rghtlt -------f- 'feets
Bloomingto-...full back.-Comstock
Siehigau-Substiutes, Myers, C, Johso,
J. Johnson, Richards, Gates. Vernon, Smith,
prumheler and Waumaher; S.. A.-
Suhstitutes, C. Bond. L. Kahn, Satek, Mar-
ti, Ray and Bonfield.
Princeton won its first game froma
the Elizabeth A. C.;' 38-0.
The income of Chicago University
for the coming year fs expected to
reach $603,000.
The University of California has
-added several new men with good
records to their track team, namely:
Cheek, '99, pole vault, 10 ft. 5/. in.;
running broad jump, 21 ft. -11 in.;
lrunning high Jump, , ft. 7 in., shot
put, 39 ft. Marmon, '99, 800, yard 10
2-5 sec.; 440 yards, 62 see. .loyd,
shot put, H0 ft. 7 in.; pole vault, 10 ft.;
running broad jump, 20 ft.

OTHER NOTED MEN TO TALK.
Many New and Interesting Fea-
tures of the Students' Lecture
Course for the Season of '95-96.
-The Best Talent Secured.
The Students' Lecture course for the
college year will be auspiciously open-
ed by Senator David B. Hill, of New
York on Oct. 25. No definite arrange-
ments have yet been made as to his
subject, but it will be a non-political
one
Following Senator Hill will be Le-
land T. Powers, the celebrated im-
personator, who will appear on Nov.
1. Mr. Powers is well known in Ann
Arbor a "d his ability ls been well
demonstrated from the entertainments
he has given heretofore.
On Dec. 11, ex-Secretary of State
John W. Foster will lecture. His sub-
ject will probably be conected with
Asiatic politics, for it was Mr. Foster
who received .the enormous fee of
$250,000 last spring for his diplomatic
advice to the Chinese government.
Few men are more acquainted with
the polies and political conditions of
Eastern Asia than is Mr. Foster.
Mrs. Geneva Johnstone-Bishop, of
Chicago, is to be in Ann Arbor again
this season. She will appear as a
member of the Ridpath Concert Co.
composed of Mrs. Bishop, Miss Maud
Powell, Mrs. Clara Murray and Mrs.
Von Scarpa. The date will be an-
tounced later.
Rev. T. DeWitt Talmage, who
was recently called to Wash-
ington to take charge of Dr.
Sunderland's church will give the
fifth number on the course, Jan. 24.
This church is the one which President
Cleveland attends. Dr. Talmage needs
no introduction to Ann Arbor aud-
iences.
Hon. Henry Watterson, editor of the
Louisville Courier-Journal, who has
set a standard in the line of oratory
to which fewh ave attained, will lec-
ture on the subject "Abraham Lin-
coln" on Feb. 14.
The second musical number of the
course will be given by the Boston
Temple Quartet on Feb. 29. Miss
Katharine Ridgeway will assist the
quartet as reader.
As usual the oratorical contest will
form one of the numbers, taking place
this year on March 20.
The secretary is negotiating also
with the -ton. Theodore Roosevelt,
president of the police commission of
New York City, and his lecture will
be definitely settled later on.
Keep Off the Sidewalks.
Many new students and some old
students do not seem to be aware of
the city ordinances agaimnst 'tiding bicy-
cles on the sidewalks. For the past
two years this baw has been enforced
strictly as to all sidewalks in the city
except those on the campus, and the
chief of police informs us that he shall
begin at once to prosecute al violators
of it. A good many fines were paid
on this account last spring.

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