100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board of Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law.

November 12, 1895 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1895-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

9

Cl e . o

a 11.

VOL. VI. No. 38. UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1895. FOUR PAGES-3 CENTS.

IONESUI T A R
Is enough for one person to
play on at one time. One
guitar is not etiough, how-19
ever, to supply 3,000 stu-
dents. That's why we have
constantly in stock several
dozens of guitars of various
makes and prices.
BETTER LOOK AT OUR
U. OF M. GUITAR.
It's good as its name.
THE ANN ARBOR ORGAN CO,,
S. MAIN ST.'n
Sheehan's
You can find the largest and most
complete stock of
SWEAJEDS AND
GYMNASIVM SOIlS

MICA. WOULD HAVE WON
HAD THE LAST HALF BEEN
PAYED OUT TO FULL TIME.
So Says the Boston Globe-Super-
for Training of Michigan Team
Apparent.
The Boston Globe of Sunday in the
report of the Harvard-Michigan game
Saturday speaks as follows concerning
ithe game and Michigan's team:
The east and the west met in foot-
ball yesterday afternoon, and once
more "beef" gave way to science.
tHarvard won from the University of
Michigan by the small score of 4 to P.
The Harvard men looked almost like
schoolboys when they lined up oppo-
site their big western opponents.
There was an air of confidence about
the Michigan men that was in marked
confrast with Harvard's determination
to regain a. lost reputatien.
There is no denying that the garme
was the best that has been played on

II

in the city. We make them to
order, in any color, design or
style desired.
Agents for the celebrated
EEO, S, PARKER FOUNTAIN PEN.
Engraved visiting cards we sup-
ply in five days.
SH EEHAN & CO.,
30 S. STATE STREET.
- -WIT, I
THE LEADING TAILOR
AND IMPORTER.
The latest and most Fashionable
Foreign Fabrics for Men's Wear.
The Largest Stock in the City.
10. 2 E. WASHINGTON ST., NEAR MAIN.
AT WAHR'S
HAVE YOU READ IT?'
College Girls,
By Abbe Carter Goodloe. II-
lustrated by Charles Dana
Gibson. For opinions ask
your neighbors. Now on sale
at
WAHR'S.
Up Town, Down Town.
UiversityBookstore Opposite CourtHouse
205S. State St. 4'N. Main St.

Soldiers field this year. The first half
saw the ball in Michigan's territory
most of the time, but it brought out
the fine defensive work of the Aim
Arbor men, which made it impossible
for Harvard to score. Hirvard gained
most of her territory in this half on
fake plays, while an exchange of
punts always netted Harvard 10 or 15
yards.
Th'e Michigan men were muc supe-
rior in the line, and it was only be-
cause Villa was the target for one at-
tack after another that Harvard final-
ly succeeded in getting through Michi-
gan's line. But Michigan's backs did
not seem to be able to do anything. It
was here that Harvard had her great-
est advantage, and it was for this rea-
son that Michigan did not come near
scoring. She could protect her own
goal f rom every natural attack, but
sshe could not rush the ball so as to
place Harvard's goal in danger.
The Michigan men played as hard
towards the end of the gante as they
did when the game began. They were
. plucky set, and if they had enjoyed
the advantages of Harvard's coaching'
they would surely have won.
The interference work on both sides
was poor, although the Harvard inter-
ference got started much quicker than
that of the Michigan men. There was
always that slowness behind the Mich-
igan line which is Iseperable from
heavy, "beefy" backs and interferers.
The superior training of the Mich-
igan men was very apparent. Only
one Michigan man had to leave the

feli, and he was not lait up untti two
minutes before the end of the game.
The men seemed almost as fresh when
they came out of the game as when
they went in. On the other hand, all
the Harvard men showed the effects
of the game, while two of them had to
retire. Had the last half been played
out before darkness set in it is very
probable that the score would have
been a different one.
NOW IT'S NORTHWESTERN.
Claim That Michigan Is Afraid to
Meet Her.
The Chicago Tribune of Saturday
says:
"If Northwestern can beat Chicago
next Saturday its championship of the
West will be assured. Michigan still
refuses to play Northwestern, but be-
fore the close of the season Manager'
Mitchell will be able to dictate his
owls terms to tie Wolverines."
Inasmuch as Northwestern failed to
beat -Missouri Saturdtay we presume
that "Manager Mitchell will not dic-
tate his own terms to Michigan," evens
though Northwestern's game with Chi-
cago has not been played yet.
The old tale about Michigan being
"afraid to meet Wisconsin" having
played out, the young sporting editors
of the Chicago papers have been vent-
ing their spite at Michigan by accus-
ing her of fear of Northwestern. Had
they cared to ascertain the facts, they
could easily have learned that Michi-
gan first made overtures to Northwest-
ern, which were refused. 'Then after
the game with Oberlin had been defin-
itely set for Nov. 2, Northwestern re-
considered her reios refusrl to play
and asked for that date.
IT MAKES US LAUGH
To Hear How They Did at Harvard
at the Game.
one of the sturents who accom-
panied the team to Boston was re-
marking yesterday on the paitoirtne
which some Harvard players would go
through about every five minurtes of
play. A man would get wided or
laid out for some slight cause and re-
main motionless on the ground. some
one would rush til with a little pail of
water and a sponge and after a couple
of minutes of frarttic applications of
the sponge, two fellows would lift himi
tip and start to carry him off the field;
whereupon he would shake his head,
make frantic motions toward the team
and finallyi by a superhuman effort
escape from his captors and with a
proud and disdainful carriage, rake
for his place in the line, amidst the
mingled plaudits and, "Wah, Wah,
Wai, Hahvahd's" of the assembled
throng.

RESULTED IN A TIE.
NEITHER '96 NOR '98 COULD
SCORE YESTERDAY.
Game Called Early on Account of
Darkness and Will Have to Be
Played Over-The Line-Up.
The game between '96 and '98 yes-
terday afterioon resulted rather n-
satisfactorily, owing to the darkness
and some misunderstanding on both
sides. The score stood nothing to
nothing, consequently the game will
have to be played over and the game
with '9 for the championship will
be postponed.
The halves were fifteen minutes long.
In the first '96 kicked off to 98's thirty
yards line and held '98 to no gain.
After a few gains the ball changed
hands on a fumble and see-sawed back
and forth between the two tlearns for
the rest of the half, not getting far
from tire ciddle of tie field.
In the second half LeRoy punted
back '98's kick off and Felver brought
the ball back to '9C's 45 yard line. A
few gains, and '96 had the ball. Again
it began to hange hands frequently.
Twice on bluff kicks LeRoy got around
the end for long gains, being finely
tackled by Felver. '9 was on 'PS's
20 yard line when they lost the ball
on a fumble. At the center '9i re-
covered the ball, but a mistake in
signaling for a kick lost '9 30 yards.
'98 regained the ball and carried it to
'9's 20 yard line. It was now very
dark and while Captain Thompson of
the '96 team was talking to the w-
pire the ball was put in play and Dick-
inson went over 'PC's line on a criss-
cross play. The ball was called back
by the referee and time was called,
after one more down, on account of
darkness.
The line ip was as follows:
'96.C'9C.
Thorp.....I.....1. e. ........SmaIley
Whitman.... 1. t. . r. ......Simmons
Thompson, c ..... g. .. ......Bennock
Newton .......... c. .......... Sav-age
Lewis ........... r. g.... Mrsh
K reis...........r. t. ............R ice
Ryan ........... r. e...r.......hom as
Bryant. .......... b. ..... ...F elbert
Dettit- I h Dckenson
Pritchard . rh............ lsei
LeRoy.t...:.. .... b. . . h.t..anmond
Subsititutes-St. Clair for Pritchard,
Goodbread for DeWittl
Kentucky Team Disbands.
The Kentucky University Enroll in
its last issue prints an obituary article
on the disbandment of the college
eleven. Lack of enthusiasus and non-
support is the cause attributed to the
demise of a tean which promised
early in the year to stand high among
southern universities.
Subscribe for the Daily.

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan