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March 09, 1894 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
U. of M. Daily, 1894-03-09

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4c . of

AT.

EX-SENATOR INGALLS.
He will Speak Tonight in the S.
A. Course and His Subject is
"Hard Times"

UNZIWVERSITY OF MICHITGAN
different departments and the High
Lschool remains about the same as
' heretofore, although the apparent
circulatioii of books is less than in

Es.-Senator tngaits speaks to1 sonic previous registratitons, owing
night in the S. L. A. Course.v e to the fact that so many books are
give a short sketch of. his life: placed in the reading room to lie
JolhnJamies Ingalls, statesnman used witbout checks.
was born in Middletown,Mass.,Dec. The use of the library is greater
9, t833. He was graduated inii now titan ever before. The average
Wiiliams in 183 studied tane and iinunmber of readers at z r a. mn. dur-
was admitted to the batrisin 8;.ing- the week wtas 18, and on two
Ile removed to Atciison, Kinss,1 idas every seat in the reading room
in 8 S and practicedt his professiont 5wis occupised, several were given
was a miember of the Wtyandotte Isats iii the ofice or at the index
eonsvention~ of 1839, secretary of the; cases, and several others wvere uil-
terrinorial council itn i 6o, andi of sible to use the library for wanit of
the state undt senate ini i 86 i, ini a seats.
msembher of tse latter body its186.is, Pint. Carhart's New Buck,
Its the sate year lie vas an sunsuic-1
iProf. H4. S. (arhiart tatstitnder
cessfusi candtidate for lieutenaint-gens--
wrepsarationsa new wvork nil t ' lectri-
ernuor. After ihis defeat hie arcelsi
cii the editorship of the AtettinsotsIa nt n estriiit,'ibc
"Chamipion'' wvhicht le retainedt fur promsises to surpsass ait ingti yet
three years. H Ie ivas again dlefeatest piublisited ott that sutbjeict.
fsor tse lietutenaist governorshtip iin tic has been using, of late years,
zfi . ut aseletedtotheUniedStewart anid Cce's wvirk in isiiclass
States Senate for the tertit begin- inheiUgnithendlMesuroeent thisn
ning its 1873, antI was reelected in sdrn ttebs odt nti
879 nitsS8~ li i~g bes-asde-subject.
l is tl r f . C a r ia r t 's o k vi ii c o n ta i n
teatecd for reelection by the pop~u-sttetliscveetb twr n
isis svho elected Senator P'efter inili h oic oee y twr n
his steasd. While in the Senate lie vas Gcc, Ibesisdes miany others sworked
consideresd one of the ablest speak-
iierousiy illustrated anid exatmples
is vi irons poslitics, Mr. Itigalls has getsuter cacti topic tromitiactual
seens engaged fit the pratice of his stork done in the laboratoiry under
profession, at Atchison. hsspriin
It wll b remmbeed tat ''I'. V se book will ttrobably be ready
Is vil b rnvusbre tat 'sr.for msarket before the opn~sing of
Ingalls spoke in te S. tL. Acouirse cleenx al
in i592; his subject thtent was: -___..___
-Problenms of ior Second Century" Gov. Rich wiil Preside.
,tnl h itail a ios plasig is- Ele following letter has, been re-
pression. ttis subject tonight is; ceised by J. B. Frooks, the chair-
--l-tarel Times-Their Cause anii
nian of the intercollegiate debate
Cure.''" *comnmittee, front Gov. Rich, accept-
The Library in Demand., ;intg thte invitation to preside.:
1Distrihbttion of reading in the D~ear Sir:-I have your letter of
general Libirary by detpartnient, the 5ths invsitinsgnte to lie present
igh schtool or city, as per registry at a debate betwveen M1ichigan U'ni-
versity and Northwestern U oiter-
ofi readers in thte reading room for si ty, of :Illinois, on April 6th. It
the week ending Saturday, March 3, know of no reason now why I can-
was as follows:! not be present, and will niake msy
No. of Books id arrangenments to be with you.
ptc. 'eriodicai'- OrawiisPer ct.Sincerely yours,
Laiterary........... 2233 7.1Jo T.Rci
Law .............. 199JHN.7i.i
Medical........... 219 .
Htomeopathic t... 1 The series of lectures oin "The
Phlarmacy......... 1 ? 4 Apostolic Age," to be given by Prof.
Dental.........26s .9iA. C. McGiffert, D. D., of Union
itigh School ..... 1 3
School of Music. 2u 4 heological seminary, of New York
City............~City, comnmences tonmorrow evening
2840 110 at eight o'clock, in McMillan hall.
The proportion of reading by te All are invited.

7, FRIDAY, MARCH (9, 1591.
LECTURE ON THE VIOLIN.
'Prof. Stanley Gives an Historical
Sketch of that Greatest of
Instruments.
Prof. Stanley's lecture last even-
ing on the "Violin,." at Frieze Me-
morial hall, was largely devoted to
thte history of the instrunment and
its evolution front the lyre of the
ancient Greeks and Romans to the
violin of today. Its nearer anes-

PRICR, THREE CENTS.
EVERY U. OF M. STUDENT
iSol Soy a coour o
is.ibyr ieH. Cemnts.
ilanii-' iy iRoss Granger..
'I/is prettiieus t elte spie "Aitf TTl ie-
sift, i.- 0?(l situ sfei- ach, itthi.
51 South Main St.

i
:

tors are the Moorish rebec, thec Ger-
isan geigi, the lute and thte itore I
recent viol. Thle Itrinmitive viol is a
ntocdificatioin of the lute aindIlhis it
turn is hot an acdalptation of the lyre
Iof classical antiquity. The instru-
ntent is, therefore, a growth and ito
definite tinte can he assigned to its
introduction, altought, it assumneclwisen,, tss ciii tstiieroii tasStyltc
ci $2,$3, $ior $5-isoesoat 5e i$1a pmivies
its present forms in the i 6th century. ittuss.Ann Arborsi s i send tori stat ox Sct
'The viola, violoncello and violinMY21OI
are all mtodifications of thtc printi-C
tive viol and diffcr ontly in conmpass 11, 183-83ttnsiii Ae.
andI size. D'f MC, - . IsClHGAN.
ft is a commtoit supipositiont that
oldl violins are the best. This is so
because only thte best of thte oldI in-
strunitents are preserved and niore-
over only the highter quality wtere-
made it earlier tinses: Goodnio-in
lins are msade today, hostever, inot- Aristc Phstsgrapher, 6 E. HURON ST.
withstanding the fact that thse
"trade" fiddle ha s greaitly rircitni FR ESH ASSORTMENT
scribed the biusiness (if the highsV> iiC
class maker. 0qt l6}1
Trof. Stanley calledh tpon M4r. t
/.eitzs to illustrate the tones of thte -i _itEt Y t
violin and to show the positions ini.TUr'rTLEI's, K48S. State St.
fingering. Thte next nunsher in this Taugbt and Danced all ever the World at
tse Leading Academies :
series still be a lecture by Prof. J Zr7 c-r-am
Demnmin, on "Thte Songs of the N A.4t4~A IiL
Missi,- piblished stithexplanssasion of dac-,
E'lleabethian Age.''byiiRoss G0 -anige's, usushorsos- , of M. ivan,
- d'.~ranger's Academy. Ann Arbor,
Mich.Tsoin tie clss-eo s Idnesiii ansileasrn
A New Translation. t-heius oSicp.', sid air done,',, iet vii:
snssuvdesiss'. i tIsynastis vsei. oliic-,cenetr
Mr. G. t'. Patterson, assitant
professor of Physics has his trans- ~J
lation of the French stork on" Pho- rRT I H 1Y
tometry," by A Palaz, in press ansd
expects the edition to be ready forB SE T
sale by May. Prof. Patterson has B S BALL GOODS
made a few additions to the original
work in order to bring it up to date. Stilts anti GymnasitumxiSup-
This will be the only English work
on a subject which is rapidly assum-
iug an important positioin in the Yti -sre inrited toexinsssfe stoek said prices.
science of electricity.
Reserved seats for the Art Recital W H '
at Frieze Memorial hail, tomorrow
night, may be secured at the hall UNIVB7RS'IfJYBOOKSTORE
from ten to twelve, tomorrow morn-
iog. STATE STREET, ANN ARBORt.

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