100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

May 01, 2014 - Image 26

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2014-05-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

metro

ISRAEL BONDS

Jewish Revival from page 24

Maimonides Tribute Dinner

HONORING

Dr. Marc A. Borovoy Dr. Jeffrey H. Margolis

Dr. David M. Siegel

KEYNOTE SPEAKER

Eli Groner

Israel's Minister for Economic Affairs to the United States

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

Registration 5:45 p.m.
Strolling Dinner 6:00 p.m.
Program 7:00 p.m.

Jewish Community Center
of Metropolitan Detroit

D. Dan & Betty Kahn Building
Eugene & Marcia Applebaum Jewish Community Campus
6600 West Maple Road • West Bloomfield, MI 48322

PROFESSIONAL HEALTH SERVICES
DIVISION CO-CHAIRS

METRO DETROIT EXECUTIVE
BOARD CO-CHAIRS

Dr. William M. Leuchter
Dr. Arthur S. Lieberman
Dr. Harris W. Mainster

Doreen N. Hermelin
Gary A. Shiffman
Lawrence A. Wolfe

COUVERT $100*

RSVP By May 15, 201

BUSINESS ATTIRE

FOR INFORMATION AND RESERVATIONS CONTACT:
Paula Lebowitz
paula.lebowitz@israelbonds.com • 248.661.3500

DIETARY LAWS OBSERVED

'Not tax deductible

INVEST IN ISRAEL BONDS • ISRAELBONDS.0

Development Corporation for Israel/Israel Bonds
6600 West Maple Road • West Bloomfield, MI 4832

I SRAE MI BONDS

This is a representative sampling of the securities offered. This is not an offering, which can
be made only by prospectus. Read the prospectus carefully before investing to fully evaluate
the risks associated with investing in Israel bonds. Member FINRA.

THANK YOU TO OUR GENEROUS SPONSO

B eaumont

s1-1,E,A,LETm

BOTS FOR I

HOS PI r AL

cGUIREWCLOS

6

S[JOHN

PROVIDENCE

This event and opinions expressed are part of a paid or community supported program and do not necessarily reflect
views, opinions, endorsement,sponsorship or recommendation of the Jewish Community Center of Metropolitan Detro

26

May 1 • 2014

JN

Josh Diskin, Ryan Landau, Jeremy Moss, Eitan Sussman and
Alix Gould-Werth are introduced.

be some balance. We're Jews, we have
strong ethical values and we should
stick to those. Our welfare as a Jewish
people is only as good as the welfare
of the people around us, and I think
that's a value that we should stick to:'
The final panel discussion, "The
Future of Jewish Detroit!' featured
Josh Diskin, senior strategist at
Detroit Labs, a software development
company; Ryan Landau, co-founder
of Chalkfly.com, an office and school
supply company; Jeremy Moss,
Southfield City Council member;
Eitan Sussman, co-director of Keep
Growing Detroit, an urban agricul-
tural organization; and Alix Gould-
Werth, a U-M Ph.D. program doctoral
student in social work and sociology.
Moss cited a population shift of
young people to the city from the
metropolitan areas.
"A young generation of people
that grew up in West Bloomfield and
Farmington Hills and Southfield find
that single lot homes don't fit our
demographics anymore, and it's not
just characteristic of the Jewish com-
munity, even from an urban planning
perspective he said. "This inbound
migration is happening all across the
country. My generation wants that
walkable community. This is not a
fad. It's a permanent thing that will
continue for generations."
Landau said that a good way that
Jews from the suburbs can start to
invest in the city is to "just take the
time to come down here and see what
Detroit has to offer.
"My brother and I started Chalkfly,
and now there are 20 full-time
employees!' he said. "Almost 50 per-
cent of them aren't originally from
Detroit. They came down here and
saw what is going on. I think it's just
a matter of time before most people
come down here and just become
amazing cheerleaders and ambassa-
dors of the city."

And when these young Jews move
back into the city, the question is how
will they interact with other Detroit
minority communities?
"Young, white people with bach-
elor's degrees are moving to Detroit
and some of them are Jewish," Gould-
Wirth said. "It's a Jewish obligation to
come to the city to do social justice
work with other communities, and
to do that work in the right way.
Listening to those communities and
bringing our skills and financial
resources to those communities and
working in partnership!'
Sussman added, "Meaningful work
requires a deep engagement that
develops through an understanding
of history. It demands working with
folks in the city in partnership. It
allows ourselves to follow — and not
simply lead:'
Diskin spoke from experience.
"Anytime you make a Detroit Lab
purchase, we're always giving back to
the community and teachers!' he said.
"We went to Mexicantown to give sup-
plies to the teachers. Everyone is excited
that we're here and doing these things.
"From a young Jewish Detroiter
starting a business here, being a part
of this Jewish community, I'm super
proud and humbled, and it's been a
very positive experience:'
Andrea Rosenfeld spent the day at
the symposium.
I thought it was amazing!' said
Rosenfeld of Berkley, who moved
back from New York City after 30
years. "I thought it was a great way
for me to learn more about what
my parents' life was like, what my
grandparents' life was like, as Jews
in Detroit moving to Oak Park, mov-
ing to West Bloomfield. And also, as
someone who's back who wants to
help as a Jew, how the Jewish commu-
nity can help with the redevelopment
and what is being done and what I
can do:'



Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan