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March 06, 2014 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2014-03-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

>> here's to

0111

'9141 ,.., 404

Jenna and Bill

Goldstein with
their gear for
Kenya

Iirms

Ophthalmologist takes daughter on medical mission to Kenya.

D

Enter The Goldsteins
Having heard about the Kenya Relief Medical Mission, Bill
Goldstein decided to go last August. He had wanted to do a
medical mission, but other obligations always had gotten in the
way.
He and his wife, Diane, members of Temple Israel in West
Bloomfield, have been on several Jewish Federation missions to
Israel; in fact, Diane is co-chair of the missions committee now
Jenna and her sister, Marly, 19, both went on Federation Teen
Missions to Israel. But this was much different.
Goldstein decided to take Jenna, who attends Cranbrook High
School, but had some anxiety about taking his daughter to the
unknown and also about what kind of surgical conditions he
would encounter.
"What I knew was that thinking about going and not getting
there was not going to help cure the blindness:' he said. "Jenna

Andrew Farbman

was named vice
chair of the NAI
Global Members'
Leadership Board.
NAI Global is the
largest, most pow-
erful global net-
work of owner-
operated commercial real estate bro-
kerage firms. He will also serve on
the NAI Global Board's Coordination
Council.

Sari Cicurel
Special to the Jewish News

r. William "Bill" Goldstein of West Bloomfield knew he
wanted to make a difference as a doctor and that's what
he set out to do in his ophthalmology practice, which
he began in 1994. He was among the first surgeons in Michigan
to perform Lasik surgery, with his first case in early 1996.
But it was this past summer when he made the biggest differ-
ence with his daughter, Jenna, 16. Their journey would not have
happened without Brittney James.
Brittney was 16, too, when she saw a Christian Children's Fund
commercial in 1998. The Alabama resident decided she wanted to
sponsor a young Kenyan boy named Newton. For three years, she
made monthly sponsorship payments. She aspired to make a trip
to Kenya to meet Newton.
But on Sept. 14, 2001, Brittney was found dead in her off-
campus apartment at the age of 19. Their lives broken, her parents
Steve and Greta decided to do something she would have wanted
to do in memory of her. They decided to meet Brittney's spon-
sored child. Six months later, Steve was in Kenya with Newton.
Prior to his departure, he added another item to his to-do list.
After contacting a local hospital in Migori, Kenya, he decided to
use his gifts as a nurse anesthetist while in Kenya. Wanting to help
as much as he could, he also collected a pallet full of supplies and
equipment and flew it to Kenya.
Seeing the need firsthand, what he witnessed was worse
than what he had imagined. Upon his return, he shared his
experience with anyone and everyone. He knew each person
had something to offer. Steve and Greta then started www.
KenyaRelief.org.

Cendrowski
Corporate Advisors
is pleased to
announce the addi-
tion of certified
machinery and
equipment apprais-
er Theresa
Shimansky
Shimansky to its
staff. She brings six years of machin-
ery and equipment appraising experi-
ence to the company and recently
became Michigan's only appraiser to
earn the designation as a Master
Certified Machinery and Equipment
Appraiser (MCMEA). This is the
highest machinery and equipment
designation of its kind, and there are
fewer than 30 certified MCMEAs in
the entire United States.

Dr. Randee Bloom

Jenna Goldstein helps examine a patient.

Bill Goldstein performs an eye exam in Kenya.

shared my passion and got busy raising supplies and money for
the Kenya Relief orphanage:'
Jenna developed a fundraiser called Adopt a Dollies. For $10,
you could name a doll and have it be given to an orphan. Jenna
raised close to $10,000. Little did she know this would not be her
only role in this medical mission.
After a very long journey, Goldstein started seeing patients
and treating cataracts. "These were some of the worst cases I had
ever encountered:' he said. "Day after day, patients came in to the
clinic traveling for miles to be seen"
Soon enough extra hands were needed and Jenna was put to
work, including being shown by another doctor how to remove
stitches after surgery.
"I didn't have time to be afraid; I was there to help. That's why
my dad and I came this far:' she said. ❑

of West Bloomfield
has been selected
to participate in
AARP's Volunteer
Leadership
Institute or VLI, a
rigorous and inno-
Bloom
vative yearlong
training program designed to elevate
highly skilled and motivated AARP
volunteers to the next level of volun-
teer leadership. She is a member of
AARP's Executive Council, a regis-
tered nurse and former hospital
administrator.

The Association of
Steel Distributors
(ASD) announced
that James "Jim"
Barnett, president
of Grand Steel
Products in
Wixom, is the
Barnett
recipient of the
industry's highest honor, the Steel
Man of the Year Award. This annual
ASD award honors one individual
who embodies leadership, dedica-
tion, service and excellence in the
steel industry. Barnett will be official-
ly recognized at a black-tie event tak-
ing place at the Waldorf Astoria in
Orlando, Fla., during the ASD annual
convention March 20-22.

March 6 • 2014

15

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