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June 20, 2013 - Image 74

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2013-06-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

obituaries

Obituaries from page 72

MAE WEISMAN, 95,

of Southfield, died June
13, 2013.
She is survived by
her daughters and son-
in-law, Bobbe and Sid
Abels of Novi, Sandra
Weiss of Chicago,
Ill.; son-in-law, Dr.
Norman (Donna) Weiss; grandchildren,
Marci Reznik, Steve (Lucy) Weiss, Amy
(Thomas) Schultz, Jason Bressler, Robby
(Sandy) Bressler; great-grandchildren,
Joely, Lauryn, Isabel, Ellie; many loving
nieces, nephews, other family members
and friends.
Mrs. Weisman was the beloved wife of
the late Abe Weisman.
Contributions may be made to a
charity of one's choice. Interment took
place at Adat Shalom Memorial Park
Cemetery in Livonia. Arrangements by
Dorfman Chapel.

Correction
• The obituary for Norman J. Stricof
(June 13) misspelled the names of
daughter Rachel Stricof and stepchildren
Evie and Debra Scheinfield.

World's Oldest Jew
Dies At Age 113
(JTA) — Evelyn Kozak, the world's old-
est Jewish person, died in New York at
the age of 113.
Kozak, who was
also the world's sev-
enth oldest person,
died last week, a day
after having a heart
attack. She would
have been 114 in
August.
She was born on
Evelyn Kozak
the Lower East Side
of Manhattan in New York City in
1899, one of nine children in a fam-
ily that had left Russia in the 1880s
to escape the anti-Semitic pogroms.
Kozak was Sabbath observant and kept
kosher.
A widow since 1957, Kozak outlived
two husbands. She had five children,
10 grandchildren, 28 great-grandchil-
dren and one great-great-grandchild,
according to the Associated Press.

Italian Gentile, Killed For
Saving Jews, Is Beatified
(JTA) An Italian Catholic activ-
ist and journalist who was declared a
Righteous Gentile by Yad Vashem was
put on the road to sainthood.
Odoardo Focherini was beatified
— the step before sainthood — at a
ceremony Saturday in his hometown
of Carpi, near Modena, in northern
Italy. Declared a martyr by the Roman
Catholic Church, Focherini is believed
to be the first Righteous Gentile, and
the first person to be killed for saving
Jews, to be beatified.
Focherini saved about 100 Jews dur-
ing World War II by establishing a res-
cue network and arranging false papers
to help them flee to Switzerland.
He was arrested in March 1944 and
sent to a series of Nazi camps. He died
at the camp at Hersbruck, Germany, in
December 1944 at the age of 37.
Yad Vashem recognized him and
a parish priest who helped him as
Righteous Among the Nations in 1969.



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Obituaries

Pope Benedict
XVI signed a
decree attesting to
Focherini's martyr-
dom in 2012.
Renzo Gattegna,
president of the
Union of Italian
Jewish Communities, Odoardo
Focherini
said in a statement
that Focherini's
memory "will also continue to be a
source of inspiration for future genera-
tions:'
In a statement, the Rome office of
the American Jewish Committee said
Focherini "acted selflessly in accor-
dance with the highest moral principles
shared by our two fraternal religions.
"This act will create yet another
bond between Christians and Jews, fur-
ther enriching our deepening dialogue.
May the recognition and memory of
Odoardo Focherini's profound faith
and humanity be a blessing to all the
world's peoples:'

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