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February 28, 2013 - Image 90

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2013-02-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

tOoin I Dr. Lewis Rosenbaum

Making Health Care

Private doctor helps to reconnect with patients.

s the number of doctors
you see growing? You go to
an internist for day-to-day
problems, a cardiologist for your
heart, perhaps an endocrinologist
for your blood sugar, a physical
medicine specialist for your aching
back, a neurologist, an oncologist,
and the list goes on. When you
are hospitalized, another new
physician team appears whom
you have never seen before.
The world of your medical care
can become both chaotic and
overwhelming.
There is an emerging group of
doctors determined to fill this
void. One such doctor is Lewis
Rosenbaum, a member of the
staff at Beaumont Hospital-Royal
Oak, who is board-certified in
internal medicine, geriatrics and
rheumatology.
Dr. Rosenbaum sees his patients
at his office, at the hospital and at
home. Dr. Rosenbaum attended
the University of Michigan
Medical School, completed
his residency at Vanderbilt
University Hospitals and obtained
a fellowship at the University of
Pittsburgh Medical Center.
Dr. Rosenbaum privately
contracts with each of his patients
as he does not participate with
Medicare.
"I was never a good fit with
Medicare. I am a non-consensus
doctor, and I am always breaking
the rules. Medicare is an
organization whose mandate is
driven by an unending and ever-
changing set of rules," he says. "I
like to see my patients both when
they are in the office and when
they are hospitalized. I also take
care of my patients at home when
the need arises.

P hoto by Jerry Zo ly ns ky

I

Dr. Lewis Rosenbaum

Dr. Lewis Rosenbaum
3535W. 13 Mile Road,
Suite 635
Beaumont Medical Center
Royal Oak, MI 48073
(248) 551-0530

10 BOOM Magazine • February 2013

"Leaving Medicare was a
wrenching experience, but I think
those patients who stayed with
me would agree that it was the
right decision," he adds.
Dr. Rosenbaum is active in the
service of Beaumont Hospital-
Royal Oak. He also works with
Project Chessed, a program of
Jewish Family Service, which
provides medical care to those
in the Metro Detroit Jewish
community whose circumstances
have become distressed.
Dr. Rosenbaum thrives
on his medical practice. He
acknowledges he has an
irreverent sense of humor.
"It's not for everyone, but I like
to have a bit of fun every day. I
too often tell my wife, Leslye, that
she married me for the jokes, but
the truth is we were both just
smitten," he says. "My poor office
staff, unfortunately, has to hear
the same stupid jokes over and
over, but I think they forgive me
for this indulgence.
"My staff and my wonderful
associate, Dr. Joseph James,
share my deep connection with
patients. Connecting with patients
and families is among the best
lessons my late father, Dr. Herbert
Rosenbaum, taught me, and
that is what I offer," he adds.
"With that bond, you can solve
problems that have a solution and
work through those that don't.
Through thick and thin, that is
what my mother, the late Doris
Rosenbaum, taught me.
"These two lessons make my
practice gratifying to me and
rewarding for my patients. That
is what a private practice can
offer." ❑

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