100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 03, 2013 - Image 23

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2013-01-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

spirituality >> Torah portion

Being A Shepherd
Boosts One's Resu

Parshat Shemot: Exodus 1:1-6:1; Isaiah
27:6-28:13; 29:22-29:23.

I

n this week's Torah portion, Shemot,
we begin a new book in the Torah,

Exodus.

In Shemot, we meet the baby Moses,
the child who will become
a great leader. His begin-
nings are exciting, but not
so auspicious. He is fated to
be killed, as the Pharaoh has
proclaimed an edict that all
Jewish boys are to be mur-
dered.
But Pharaoh didn't count
on the cadre of strong women
who guided and shepherded
Moses to adulthood: his own
mother, Yocheved, Moses' big
sister, Miriam, and Pharaoh's
own daughter who has no
name in the Torah, but in Jewish tradi-
tion is known as "Batya."
Together, these three women, out of
love for this helpless baby, take Moses
out of the Nile (Batya does this), offer to
find him a wet nurse (Miriam does this)
and nourishes Moses (Yocheved man-
ages to do what no woman I know has
been able to accomplish; she is actually
paid to nurse her own child).
So, Moses, from these tension-fraught
beginnings, grows up in Pharaoh's house
and becomes an adult. Despite Moses'
privileged upbringing, he always has the
sensibility of a Jew. When Moses sees an
Egyptian beating a Hebrew slave, Moses
strikes the Egyptian taskmaster, killing
him. Moses quickly flees town and goes
out to the desert, fearful for his life.
While in the desert, Moses becomes
a shepherd. It is quite fascinating that
the greatest leader of the Jews, Moses,
and the greatest King of the Jews, King
David, both had early work experience
as shepherds. Why is it that shepherding
seems to be just the perfect entry level
job for future Jewish leadership?
It appears that good shepherding skills
are transferable to future leadership
roles. Good shepherds have regard and
care for their flock. They work to keep
their flock safe. They have to have good

interpersonal skills with farmers and
other shepherds, so they do not trespass
or intrude on other people's spaces.
And the shepherd must stand up for the
needs of their flocks.
In addition, (and believe it
or not, I learned this during
a shepherding class in Israel),
good shepherds understand
which animal is the "alpha,"
the big sheep, as it were, or
sometimes, as it was in my
class, the little female goat
The shepherd must share
leadership with the lead ani-
mal, knowing that the other
animals follow the alpha.
It is no accident that one
of the psalms of comfort
after losing a loved one is the 23rd
Psalm, which begins "The Lord is my
Shepherd" When we, God's flock, feel
lost and unmoored, the metaphor of a
God who counts us and looks after us
and tends to us is a source of solace that
resonates for many.
Moses, who was shepherded into
this world by three women of strength,
shepherds his animal flock, then tends
to the needs of his human flock as we
escape from Egypt and travel back to
our Promised Land. Moses' early work
prepared him for the job that he was
designed to do, the job that he was called
to do by our greatest Shepherd.



Keren Alpert is a rabbi at Temple Beth El in

Bloomfield Township.

Achieve

--in

arts

Detroit Country Day School

provides its students with a

well-rounded liberal arts education

that is nationally recognized

for a tradition of excellence in

academics, athletics and the arts.

LOWER SCHOOL:

Pre-K3 — 2nd grade
3003 West Maple Rd
248.430.2740

JUNIOR SCHOOL:

3rd — 5th grade
3600 Bradway Blvd
248.430.1074

MIDDLE SCHOOL:

6th — 8th grade
22400 Hillview Ln
248.430.3655

UPPER SCHOOL:
9th — 12th grade

22305 West 13 Mile Rd
248.430.3587

DETROIT COUNTRY DAY SCHOOL
www.dcds.edu

Visit our Open House on Sunday, January 13 • 1-3 p.m.

1764420

riNamirvim

MITO
PIURCHASERS

NEW AND USED CAR BROKER

mil I1, 1 1

Licensed Automobile Dealer
in Michigan since 1965.

Conversations

• What early work have you
done that prepared you to deal
with life's challenges?
• Who have been your
shepherds?
• Who have been the members
of your flock that you
shepherded?

7011 Orchard Lake Road,
West Bloomfield, MI 48322
Ofc. 248-851-2277
Cell. 248-496-2277

I ALSO BUY AND SELL NICE USED CARS AND TRUCKS.

Log on to JNonline.us

giveaways • forums • calendars

VISIT JNonline.us

January 3 • 2013

23

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan