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May 17, 2012 - Image 68

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2012-05-17

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obituaries

Obituaries from page 58

In Memoriam:

Slain Shopowner Had
Charisma, Wit, Depth

Jean Frankel

unwanted train set. Nate became a col-
lector of 0-gauge and pre-war Lionel
and European trains, and he and Janis
he community lost a hard-
attended train shows throughout the
working, people-loving family country.
man with the tragic death
Mostly, though, he worked — seven
of Nathan "Nate" Feingold, 65, of West
days a week. He did whatever was nec-
Bloomfield.
essary to provide for his beloved family.
The veteran antiques dealer died
Mr. Feingold typically purchased
May 8, 2012, a victim of a brutal crime.
items brought to his store on weekdays.
Mr. Feingold was beaten
Late on Friday, through
to death with a base-
Sunday, he sold merchan-
ball bat inside his store
dise from his huge room
on Michigan at Cecil in
at the Dixieland Flea
Southwest Detroit.
Market in Waterford. He
On May 13, a 34-year-old
was regarded as one of the
Detroit man was arraigned
premier antiques dealers in
in 36th District Court on
Michigan.
charges of first-degree pre-
Besides antiques, Nate
meditated murder, felony
appreciated art, and classi-
Nathan Fe ingold
murder and larceny from
cal, opera and.other music.
a person. A preliminary hearing is set
He loved playing poker and bowled in
for May 24. He remains in custody and
two B'nai B'rith leagues. Four years ago,
faces life in prison if convicted.
Janis said he bought a 1988 Cadillac for
Two years ago, Mr. Feingold was
$1,000 "to fix up and have fun with."
also affected by crime when he shot
His Facebook profile picture shows him
and killed an intruder trying to rob
beside the car with one of his "'famous"
his store. Friends and family members
cigars in his mouth.
say he always felt remorseful about
Nate truly relished his new role of
it although he'd clearly acted in self-
Zayda — never Grandpa — to Marla
defense.
and Avi's children. He liked to go fish-
At Mr. Feingold's overflow funeral
ing with family and friends on Walnut
service at Ira Kaufman Chapel in
Lake and had big plans to share his
Southfield on May 11, Rabbi Aaron
pastime this summer with the next
Bergman described Mr. Feingold as a
generation: Aeden Nachom, 4, and her
person of "charisma, wit and depth."
brother Evan, 2.
The rabbi officiated with his Adat
The thought of Nate's murder is puz-
Shalom Synagogue colleague Cantor
zling to his family. By all accounts, he
Daniel Gross. The Feingold children,
was well liked.
all based in Chicago — Leonard,
"Dad had an outgoing personality
Pamela and Marla and her husband, Avi that quickly turned strangers it into
Nachom — delivered heartfelt eulogies. friends:' Marla said. He's remembered
Mr. Feingold, the eldest child of
as never hesitating to offer cash and
Holocaust survivors from Warsaw,
other help to friends and acquain-
Poland, was born in a displaced per-
tances in need.
sons camp in Germany. Yiddish and
Eulogizing her father, Pamela
German were his first languages. His
Feingold advised: "Don't remember how
family came to Detroit in 1949 and later he died, but how he lived." Clearly, with
resided in Livonia, where Nate was a
a heart of gold.
wrestler and played football and French
Mr. Feingold is survived by his wife,
horn at Clarenceville High School. He
Janis Feingold; son, Leonard Feingold
later attended Schoolcraft Community
of Chicago; daughters and son-in-law,
College, also in Livonia.
Marla and Avi Nachom of Chicago; and
A neighbor gave Nate the phone
Pamela Feingold of Chicago; grand-
number of his future wife, Janis Travis.
children, Aeden and Evan Nachom;
"Our blind date took place on the
brother, Martin Feingold; sister, Marilyn
Fourth of July in 1975, and we would
Feingold; mother-in-law, Beverly Travis;
have been married 36 years on June 15',' brother-in-law, Neil Travis. He is also
Janis said.
survived by a world of friends.
Nate was a sales representative with
He was the devoted son of the late
United Insurance Co. before turning his
Leon and the late Golda Feingold; the
passion into a career. For 30 years, he
dear son-in-law of the late Julius Travis.
bought and sold antiques and model
Interment was at Adat Shalom
trains and had a reputation for honesty
Memorial Park. Contributions may
in all his business dealings.
be made to a charity of one's choice.
As a child, he was thrilled when
Arrangements by Ira Kaufman
his little brother passed down an
Chapel.

Esther Allweiss Ingber
Contributing Writer

We mourn the death of
Jean Frankel, loving wife of
Samuel Frankel for many
decades and mother of a large
family,
including
Stanley
Frankel. Together, Jean and
Samuel built a family, nour-
ished the Jewish community of
Detroit, sustained manyinn ova-
tive programs at the University
of Michigan, including the Jean
& Samuel Frankel Center for
Judaic Studies, and contributed
to the flourishing of education
in Israel. She was part of a pro
foundly influential generation
of American Jews, and she will
be sorely missed. Our hearts go
out to her children, grandchil-
dren, andgreat grandchildren.
May her memory be a blessing.

T

Deborah Dash Moore,

Director, The Jean Se Samuel Frankel
Center for Judaic Studies
and Frederick G. L. Huetwell
Professor of History at the
University of Michigan

Ftanicef
Center for Judaic Studies

L SA

1 75,E, ICO

60

May 17 • 2012

Obituaries

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