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September 15, 2011 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2011-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

health & fitness

RETIREMENT LIVING

Breast Cancer
Awareness Event

Experts to speak at Shaarey Zedek.

L

"I USED TO WONDER IF

MOM WAS LONELY

NOW SHE HAS MORE FRIENDS THAN I DO."

hen your mom moves to The Park at Trowbridge,

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grit,e YweZ

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Southfield, MI 4 80 33

For more information or
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(248) 352-0208

I HORIZON MY

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IFTIIIMeNT

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ff









Doeskiv_

RESTAURANT

.

Homestyle cooking.
Daily specials. Full bar.
Carryout. Children's menu
Polish & American Menu

bottled
wines
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ursday

Our specialties: Stuffed Cabbage, Pierogi, Potato Pancakes

Good Sept. 8th - Sept. 29th

111

'

<

L

6565 Cooley Lake Rd.
Waterford, MI

(Just West of Lochaven)

248-363-6565

Open daily for lunch and dinner

www.Dobski.com

=IN

20% OFF

NMI

Food Total

Valid Sunday- Thursday. Not valid with any other offer or coupon.
No other discounts apply. Exp. Sept 30, 2011
Not good on Tuesday specials and not good with any party of 8 or more.

JN

Keep your company top of mind with our readers.

ADVERTISE WITH US! CALL 248.351.5107

Visit theJEW1SHNEWS.com

52

September 15 • 2011

JN

iz Barash is celebrating five
years cancer-free this year.
The West Bloomfield attorney
was diagnosed with breast cancer
when she was 45, and she has a mes-
sage to other women in the com-
munity: Be vigilant when it comes
to preventing the disease and diag-
nosing it early. "No one cares more
about your health than you do," she
said. "Listen to your body and your
family tree. Be proactive."
One way to do that will be
attending a free educational pro-
gram put on by the Sisterhood of
Congregation Shaarey Zedek on
Monday, Oct. 3, from 7-8:30 p.m.,
where women will have the chance
to ask questions of two experts on
the disease from St. Joseph Mercy
Oakland: Dr. Judie Goodman, medi-
cal director of oncology services
and cancer committee chair, and
Dr. Amy Kirby, director of breast
services.
Linda Cohen, Sisterhood presi-
dent, organized the event. "If it saves
one life or makes one person get
tested, it will be a successful pro-
gram," she said.
Jewish women, in particular,
need to be on guard against the
disease, according to Dr. Goodman.
Ashkenazi Jewish people are 10
times more likely to have a gene
mutation that causes breast cancer,
called BRCA, than the general popu-
lation. Goodman suggests Jewish
women undergo genetic testing for
the mutation.
However, only 7 percent of breast
cancer cases in Ashkenazi patients
are caused by this mutation. Barash,
whose mother died from breast can-
cer, was tested for the BRCA muta-
tion. Tests came back negative, but
she was still very vigilant about her
breast health because of her family
history. If a woman has a mother
or sister with the disease, she is at
higher risk, Goodman said.
"I began getting annual mam-
mograms and clinical breast exams
several times a year:' Barash said.
Although she performed monthly
self-exams as suggested, she still
needed "objective hands," she added.

Dr. Judie

Dr. Amy Kirby

Goodman

In 2006, a mammogram came
back suspicious for calcifications
and she had a biopsy that came back
positive for in sutu ductal breast
cancer. Her doctor recommended a
lumpectomy and radiation. Barash
decided to visit an oncologist before
the scheduled lumpectomy, who
found another tumor that the mam-
mogram had missed. "That doctor
saved my life," said Barash, who
opted to have a bilateral mastec-
tomy because of her family history.
"It was an easy decision for me to
make!"
Barash's persistence in regu-
lar screening and the proactive
approach she takes about her health
helped to save her life, she said.
Breast cancer, when diagnosed
early, has an 80-90 percent sur-
vival rate, according to Dr. Kirby.
Prevention and early detection are
key.
Women whose mothers had breast
cancer should begin getting mam-
mograms 10 years younger than the
age their mothers were at diagnosis.
For example, if your mother was
diagnosed at age 48, you would
begin annual mammograms at age
38. All women should begin yearly
mammograms at age 40, regard-
less of family history, according to
Goodman. Other risk factors for
breast cancer include obesity and
excessive alcohol use.
Goodman and Kirby will discuss
prevention, screenings as well as
current treatments for breast cancer
at the program, Oct. 3, at Shaarey
Zedek, in Southfield.
The program is free and open
to the public, but reservations are
requested by Sept. 30. To RSVP, con-
tact sisterhood@shaareyzedek.org,
or call (248) 357-5544, ext. 48.

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