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October 07, 2010 - Image 37

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2010-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Childean News J

II

DETROIT
iEWI S H NEWS

month-old Project Bismutha resembles Proj-
ect Chessed, created nearly six years ago by
the Jewish Family Service of Metropolitan
Detroit. Dr. Elyas and other Chaldean medi-
cal professionals model their approach on
Chessed, helped by guidance from Jewish
counterparts. (Bismutha is Aramaic for heal-
ing, while Chessed is Hebrew for kindness.)

'Community safety net'

Medical providers donate services and fa-
cilities to create "a community safety net
with access to a care network," says Rachel
Yoskowitz, director of Chessed. "Because if
you need healthcare, you need healthcare
— it doesn't matter what [finances] you
have. It's important for everyone to have a
medical home, a place they can be treated if
they're not feeling well."
From her office in West Bloomfield, she
adds: "The Chaldean community recognized
a similar need, and organizers from Project
Bismutha came to us."
Rising need during the economic recession
strains both nonprofits. "A lot of people lost
their insurance" due to layoffs, Dr. Elyas notes.
At the same time, "thousands of refugees corn-
ing from back home [Iraq] have no work and
no insurance — just minimal government as-
sistance that expires shortly after arrival."
Similarly, Project Chessed's director

I

T E

building
community

i on N ITIATIVE

PRESENTING SPONSOR

Players of varied ages
mix sports, fellowship

Bank of America.

To stay active and healthy. some Jews and Chaldeans play

the way they pray —participating in organized sports with

friends who share faith, friendship and a sense of family.

"We get together with a bunch of guys early in the

morning." says Jeff Fox, who skates with players aged

GOLD SPONSORS

from 25 to near 70 in the informal Almost All Jewish

Hockey League. We don't keep stats. other than the

score, and just skate to stay in shape and keep playing."

WAYNE STATE
UNIVERSITY

The league has been lighting the lamp for nearly

three decades, with some founders seeing their sons

lace up skates to keep the tradition alive.

The Chaldean Hockey League is more formal than its

Jewish counterpart, but many players focus on the same

meijer

benefits. Athletes range from 16 to their early 40s,

according to Read Kello, co-commissioner with Robert

Esshaki.

DIVIC

"Most of the guys grew up playing sports. As I got

older, I started playing goalie to keep active," says Kello,

46. YOU also get to meet new people, so it acts as

DETROIT MEDICAL CENTER

informal networking."

In addition, there are Chaldean football and

basketball leagues that have been around for more than

20 years.

A new initiative, Come Play Detroit. founded by Justin

Jacobs and working in part with the Jewish Federation of

Metropolitan Detroit's Community Next program, aims to

yf

SILVER SPONSORS

broaden the participation in physical activity in southeast

Michigan.

"Our goal is to expand people's communities, says

Jacobs. "We're trying to change a culture around here,

create something for young professionals to be a part of."

For those not participating in team sports, a Jewish-

Chaldean partnership dedicated to investing in the

community's health offers a full-body fitness workout.

Scott George, along with partners David Newman, Sam

Selman, Mike Knight and Karla Atchoo, runs the Art of

Lawrence
Tech

.

Strength (ADS) Training Center in West Bloomfield.

,

1111.11111 1PINIVEMPRIIIIMO

Rachel Yoskowitz

Unconventional training methods focus on mixing

cardiovascular exercise with strength training and body

sculpting. Clients can burn up to 1,000 calories in a

DEARBORN 1

COLLEGE
OF BUSINESS

60-minute session, according to George.

notes that "if every doctor pledged to see
X number of [uninsured] patients, we could
help a lot more people be healthy."
And that, would be a mitzvah or bring
bismutha across our communities.

"When people do this type of training. they fall in love

with it," adds George, a certified AOS trainer.

And it's not all about just what you do in the training

center.

"We give some guidelines on what to eat. We want

to make sure our clients put beneficial foods in their

Alan Stamm and Justin Fi.sette are
writers for Tanner Friedman, a
marketing communications firm in
Farmington Hills.

bodies, to take full advantage of their workouts with us."

— Justin Fisette

1E1

Bloomfield Hills Schools

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