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April 15, 2010 - Image 53

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2010-04-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

courage and strength when the going got
tough."
What he remembers most about Swayze
is "the inspirational way in which he faced
and waged his war against cancer. He
never complained, he never felt sorry for
himself, he never despaired.
"To have known Patrick in general was
a great honor, but to have known him and
been close to him in that particular period
was life-changing. I have never witnessed
such unassuming heroism."
Sinclair's own extraordinary life often
mirrors that of his childhood idol, Albert
Schweitzer. "I wanted to emulate him,"
Sinclair says. "So I studied theology [at the
University of Virginia and in Italy] and
medicine [at Johns Hopkins University]
in the hopes of becoming a missionary. I
failed miserably, though, when I went to
India and realized I was too soft for that
climate."
Medicine as a paid profession was never
an option — "I swore never to earn any
money as a doctor; I believe it is unethi-
cal, a conflict with our oath" — so Sinclair
became a writer, instead.
Sinclair's father was a journalist and

Educational Foundation. Additionally,
the Ann and Jules Doneson Film Festival
Endowment Fund was established by
Shira and Steve Klein to help ensure the
festival's longevity. This year's festival
chairs are Levana Aronson, Norman Miller
and Roberta Tankenow. [11

Halye Aisner is marketing director at the

Jewish Community Center of Greater Ann

native of Italy who often brought his
family back to his home, where Joshua
served as an extra in, and contributed
to the writing of, several films includ-
ing The Garden of the Finzi-Continis,
the story of an Italian-Jewish family.
"When [Director Vittorio] de Sica real-
ized I spoke both Italian and English ...
he asked me to rewrite some of the dia-
logue," Sinclair says.
Since then, Sinclair has helped write,
direct or appeared in numerous movies
including Lili Marlene, Judgment in Berlin,
The Assassination of Trotsky and Just a
Gigolo, Marlene Dietrich's last film. He also
is the man behind the popular miniseries
Shaka Zulu, based on his book telling the
story of Shaka, who headed the Zulu tribe
from 1816 to 1828.
Sinclair, who previously worked with
Mother Theresa in Calcutta, recently
returned from Haiti, where he served
as a volunteer physician and witnessed
"heroism and cowardice, generosity and
greed. Suffering is a time for us all to show
what we are made of." His next projects
are films about a Nazi attempt to murder
Mussolini and the life of Saint Edith Stein,

Jump!

the Jewish
convert to Catholicism
who died in Auschwitz. 0

Jump! will be screened 8 p.m.

Monday, April 26, at the Michigan
Theatre in Ann Arbor and 2 p.m.
Sunday, May 2, at the United Artists
Commerce Township.

With Special Appearances By

Thursday, April 22: Patron Night at

the Jewish Community Center in West
Bloomfield
• 7 p.m. Author-actor-director Joshua
Sinclair (Jump!) will discuss his nota-
ble film projects. Invitation-only for
patrons. For more information about
becoming a patron, call (248) 432-
5461 or e-mail info@jccdet.org .

Arbor.

Friday, April 20: Film Festival

Individual movie tickets are $10
each, or a festival pass for all 14
films can be purchased for $70 (JCC
members) or $75 (nonmembers)
at the Jewish Community Center of
Greater Ann Arbor. For more infor-
mation, go to www.jccannarbor.org ,
or contact Mimi Weisberg at
mimiweisberg@jccfed.org or
(734) 971-0990.

Patrick Swayze

in a scene from

Workshop Initiatives at the JCC in
West Bloomfield
•11:30 a.m.-1 p.m.; $20 (includes
lunch): Lunch and Learn Panel
Discussion: Michigan, the New
Hollywood?
•3:30-5 p.m.; $20 (includes refresh-
ments): Actors' Workshop: Making It in
the Film Industry.
•4-5:30 p.m.; $20 (includes refresh-
ments): Technical Workshop: How

Movies Are Made.

Tuesday, April 27: United Artists

Commerce Township
•5 p.m. Filmmakers Sue Marx and
Allyson Rockwell will attend screen-
ing of Detroit Remembers When: The

•• •

Commerce Township
•8 p.m. The Jewish Gay Network of
Michigan will host a discussion with
Jewish, Muslim and Christian panel
members following City of Borders.

Wednesday, April 29: United Artists

Tuesday, April 27: Birmingham

Commerce Township
•5 p.m. Filmmaker Emily Kunstler will
speak about Disturbing the Universe:

Palladium 12

William Kunstler.

Jewish Community.

•8 p.m. Rabbi Joshua Bennett of

Temple Israel will lead a discussion fol-
lowing The Debt.

Wednesday, April 28: United Artists

Commerce Township
•5 p.m. Filmmaker Leila Ferault will
speak following Bon Papa: A Man

Under German Occupation.

Wednesday, April 28: United Artists

Sunday, May 2: United Artists

Commerce Township
•9:30 a.m. Bagel Brunch
•10:30 a.m. Screening of Holy Land

Hardball.

Sunday, May 2: United Artists

Commerce Township
•8 p.m. Filmmaker Judy Malz will
speak about No. 4 Street of Our Lady.

April 15 a 2016

49

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