100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

March 25, 2010 - Image 42

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2010-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Spirituality

The fine stores & shops
of Lincoln Center
wishes everyone a
Happy & Healthy
Passover
-14_

Corn Forbidden, Too?

ADVANCE AMERICA ID A.J. WRIGHT 0,) ALDI e::it ASHLEY STEWART ED

BASKIN ROBBINS

0,3 DOLLAR CASTLE

g BOOK BEAT

KMART

JACKIE'S FASHIONS

LA INSURANCE

LINCOLN BARBER SHOP

ti

LEES BEAUTY SUPPLY f5-'Zt

MAGIC TOUCH BEAUTY SALON (73

METROPOLITAN DRY CLEANERS

MOOKEY E S BEANS & GREENS

PAYLESS SHOE SOURCE

RAINBOW APPAREL

Rabbi Shmuel Singer

i)

DOTS ;-‘•:.! ERROL SHERMAN FOOTCARE

j INSTANT TAX SERVICE

RADIO SHACK

SASSY'S UNIFORMS et SECRETARY OF STATE ED

STREET CORNER MUSIC

SUZANNE'S BREAD BASKET DELI

SUIT DEN 'a

I NAILS 03

at WHITE CASTLE/CHURCH'S CHICKEN

Lincoln Center R Greenfield at lb

Y2 Mile

OAKLAND COUNTY'S PREMIER

"Thinking of getting divorced.
Hire an attorney who
will fight for you!"

SANDOR M. GELMAN

Protect
what's
important
to you.

42

March 2542010

GELMAN, ZUKIN & STEELE, P.C.

ATTORNEYS AND COUNSELORS AT LAW
3001 WEST BIG BEAVER, SUITE 324
TROY, MICHIGAN 48084

PRACTICE LIMITED TO MATRIMONIAL LAW

iN

Explaining the mysteries of kitniyot.

Special to the Jewish News

New York

P

assover is primarily known as
the Jewish holiday of freedom,
which also happens to feature a
myriad of rules concerning food. There
are foods we must eat, such as matzah,
and there are foods one is forbidden to
consume, such as chametz.
Chametz is defined by Halachhah
(Jewish law) as the product of one of
the five forbidden grains that has come
into contact with water and become
fermented. These biblically prohibited
grains are wheat, oats, barley, rye and
spelt. These grains may not be con-
sumed in any form out of concern that
they may have come into contact with
water and become chametz. The one
exception to this is, of course, if these
grains are milled into Passover flour
and baked into matzah with full-time
rabbinical supervision.
The Halachah only forbids these five
grains. However, beginning in medi-
eval times, Ashkenazic communities
added kitniyot to the list of prohibited
species. Kitniyot includes other grain-
like items such as rice and corn as well
as seeds and beans.
Various reasons are given for this
prohibition. In some cases, flour can
be made out of these species. In other
cases, the seeds of the species resemble
forbidden grain kernels. Both of these
circumstances could cause some to
confuse kitniyot with actual grains.
Additionally, in yet other situations,
kitniyot and grain crops are grown in
close proximity to one another and
grain may become mixed into kitniyot
varieties. While the reasons are, in some
cases, unclear or seemingly irrelevant, it
remains definite that Ashkenazic practice
prohibits consumption of the full range
of kitniyot species.
Non-Ashkenazic communities
never accepted this prohibition and,
in general, continue to use kitniyot on
Passover. However, some of these com-
munities do forbid the usage of certain
kinds of kitniyot on the holiday. This
depends on local communal custom.
It is also somewhat unclear what is
included in the category of kitniyot.
Since the prohibition is based on binding
custom, there is no general principle that
can be followed here. Basically, whatever
has been accepted over the generations

as kitniyot is
prohibited and
everything
else remains
permitted.
There is no
doubt that rice,
millet, corn and
buckwheat have
always been con-
sidered kitniyot.
The same is true
of the many
species of beans
and peas. Seeds
and spices are
more open to question and to varying
local customs in different parts of the
Ashkenazic world.
Sesame seeds, mustard, sunflower
seeds, cardamom (an herbal seed
which grows in a pod), fennel and
poppy seeds are universally considered
to be kitniyot. There are different opin-
ions about coriander, cumin and anise.
The Orthodox Union poskim (halachic
decisionmakers) consider these not to
be kitniyot. However, the spices require
special care for Passover use since kitniyot
and even chametz grains are frequently
mixed into them.
Peanuts were considered kitniyot in
some parts of Europe and permitted in
others. Present-day practice is to consider
them kitniyot. The OU does not permit
quinoa and amaranth in products certi-
fied for Passover use, but suggests that
individuals ask their own rabbi for
guidance on home use.
There is a further disagreement
regarding kitniyot oil and other kitniyot
derivatives. Some authorities forbid
them while others maintain that only
kitniyot in the original form are prohib-
ited. Present-day practice is to prohibit
these items on Passover.
The OU and many other kosher agen-
cies accept kitniyot derivatives when
the product has undergone a complete
chemical change and bears no resem-
blance to the original kitniyot. This
includes items such as citric acid and
aspartamem, which are derived, at
least in part, from corn that has gone
through many chemical changes to
reach its current state.
The laws governing what may or may
not be eaten are much stricter during
Passover than the rest of the year. Pi

Rabbi Singer is director of Passover

supervision, OU Kosher.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan