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March 26, 2009 - Image 73

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2009-03-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

A Place For Art from page C17

"Expressions of Vienna: Master Drawings
by Klimt and Schiele from the Pulgram-
McSparran Collection" showcases a recent
gift of Austrian Expressionism donated by
two professors. "UMMA Projects: Walead
Beshty" inaugurates the museum's new
signature series focusing on global design.
Jacob Proctor, associate curator of
modern and contemporary art, installed
the newer pieces. "The changes have
moved us forward in our ability to serve
the university and the region, and I'm
excited to have the additional gallery
space Proctor says. "Extremely contem-
porary art will be a constant presence."
One Jewish painter represented is
Jules Olitski, whose Absalom Passage-18
is almost entirely monochromatic. The
large work was completed with rollers
and a spray gun.
"This is a color-field painting with
thin, pearlescent lines; and it's histori-
cally important," Proctor says.
Christian Boltanski, whose father
was Jewish, captures Holocaust subjects
through his installation Monument to the
Lycee Chases, which recalls students at a
private Jewish high school in 1931 Vienna.
"The installation holds photographs
and light bulbs and is part of a series:'
Proctor explains. "The artist found a
photo of the graduating class, enlarged
and isolated each face and made prints
installed on a wall. Because of the year
of the original photograph, it refers
obliquely to the relationship between life
and death."
Proctor, who is developing programs
with university departments steeped in
other disciplines, is preparing for some
combined presentations.
"I hope we can make museum experi-
ences equally relevant to people of all
backgrounds:' Proctor says.
Prue Rosenthal, a project donor and
longtime docent, is impressed with the
way the building reflects the architecture
of today.
"I'm pleased that the museum now
has the ability to show more of its works
with the architecture allowing more nat-
ural light on the objects',' says Rosenthal
of Ann Arbor, who has served on UMMA
committees as well as with affiliates of

The University of Michigan
Museum of Art, 525 State St.,
opens its galleries 10 a.m.-5
p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays
and Saturdays; 10 a.m.-10 p.m.
Thursdays-Fridays and noon-5 p.m.
Sundays. The building is open 8
a.m.-midnight seven days a week.
Admission is free. (734) 763-
UMMA; www.umma.umich.edu .

Maxine Frankel: "We felt a

responsibility to help enhance

the museum's facility."

the Jewish Federation of Greater Ann
Arbor and Beth Israel Synagogue. "We
have Tiffany glass that hasn't been dis-
played for many years, and we have a
new group of Korean art.
"We're hoping people from throughout
Michigan will visit UMMA because of its
wide and diverse collection. I've seen some
of the beautiful turned wood that will be
on view for the opening, and I know the
shop will be selling wood pieces."
The UMMA National Advisory Board
includes Burt Aaron, a collector and entre-
preneur from Ann Arbor; Michele Oka
Doner, an artist and U-M alumna based
in New York; Susu Sosnick, an art collector
and philanthropist from Birmingham; and
Ellen Taubman, an art curator and philan-
thropist from New York.
"The leadership of the university sees
the museum as an important priority
and a tremendous asset, but the building
is only the beginning," Frankel says.
"What we do with the building now
that we have it is really key, and we have
great expectations for what will happen
going into the future."

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Events

The following events are part of
the UMMA grand opening celebra-
tion running 6 p.m. Saturday,
March 28, through 6 p.m. Sunday,
March 29:
6 p.m. midnight:
choral group performances
student performances
competitive games, including
mahjong and euchre
midnight 6 a.m.:
dance party
music video shows
games and performances
6 a.m. noon:
yoga and tai chi
cartoons
Gemini concert (11 a.m.)
noon 6 p.m.:
poetry extravaganza
gallery hunt for kids
dance performances and
participation
discussions with curators

-

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your TOTAL
food bill

ANY TIME

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any other offer

expires 4/5/09

Authentic Korean & Japanese Cuisine

Phone (248) 827-1600

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Open Daily

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March 26 2009

C19

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