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September 11, 2008 - Image 20

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2008-09-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Metro

Your Cellular Superstore/

'Giving Back •

Question:

Grateful Soviet Jews make
a special gift to Israel.

What are

mobile graphics?

Answer:

Graphics are down-
loadable pictures that can be used
on your wireless phone as screen-
savers, caller ID logos, and more.

ataMM. WMORPNTMOP II*W"-

A

Question:

1,

What is the
difference between WiFi and
wireless intemet?

Answer:

U

Wireless Internet
is just one of the services that wifi
optionally supports. Wifi is a wireless
communication standard used be-
tween computer devices to share files
and resources. The wifi signal cannot
travel long distances without loss of
integrity, and it is therefore used for
Local Area Networks (LANs). In the
home, a wireless LAN might include
a personal desktop system and laptop,
while in the workplace, a wireless
network commonly connects numer-
ous computers within a commercial
building. The wifi signal might also
cover a small region within a city,
creating hot spots or places where the
wifi signal allows connectivity to the
public through wireless access points
(WAPs).

Lenore Deutch-Singer has been
one of Hebrew Free Loan's most
passionate advocates for years, first
as the spouse of a Board member,
and then as a Board member herself.
Through the years, she has seen the
changes HFL has faced.
"Years ago, we didn"t get the kind
of sad stories we hear now from our
borrowers," Lenore says. "But what I
love is we don't let anybody down,
whether it's with financial or emotion-
al support. People are nervous when
they come in, but when they leave,
they want to hug you for being there,
for caring, and for listening. They can
walk out saying they gained a friend,
whether we give a loan or not. We all
care so much, and I feel so lucky to
be able to do this.
"I bring my heart to Hebrew Free
Loan. I do this because I love it, and
I wish people could see all the good
we do."

Personal digital assistants, cell phones,
and other handheld electronics com-
monly have wifi ability built-in. This
allows them to connect wirelessly to a
wifi-enabled network to transfer files,
access data, or surf the Internet.

Donate to Hebrew Free Loan
and help care for your family,
friends and neighbors.

Hebrew Free Loan provides interest-
free loans for living expenses,
medical fees and many other
needs: small business start-up
costs, tuition assistance, summer
camp, training, and much more. If
you or someone you know needs
help, please click or call.

www.hfldetroit.org
248.723.8184

VW=

I Present this column
I
for a FREE
Bluetooth®
headset.

HEBREW
FREE LOAN

hfldetroit.org

Aiding ARMDI

The impetus for choosing ARMDI
came from Alex Goldis of Bloomfield

Giving Back on page A22

Certain models available, limited quantities
available, must purchase a new/upgrade
activation. Certain restrictions apply.

Visit the nearest locations at:

Jennifer Babby

12 Mile & Northwestern • 248.945.0090

We Provide Loans.

Elizabeth Price

We Promise Dignity.

10 Mile & Evergreen • 248.948.5000

Jewish
Federation

Sandy Maizi

Orchard Lk. & Telegraph • 248.253.1400

WE'RE PART.OF TZTEZ

1427260

September 11 • 2008

spanking new, fully equipped
ambulance will soon be sav-
ing lives on the streets of
Israel and, for the first time, Detroit-
area Jews from the former Soviet
Union (FSU) raised the money to
purchase it.
For their efforts in achieving a fund-
raising goal of more than $100,000,
Zoya and Emmanuel "Manny Gauzer
of Farmington Hills and Tamara
and Eugene Friedman of Bloomfield
Hills will receive the Distinguished
Humanitarian Service Award of
American Red Magen David for Israel
(ARMDI) at the organization's Sept. 21
dinner-dance.
Manufactured in Indiana, three
ambulances will be dedicated at the
event before going to New York for
shipment to Israel.
The Detroit Jewish community will
also send two other ambulances to
Israel, donated by Dr. Peter and Rachel
Siegel of West Bloomfield and the
Goodman family, with a business in
Oak Park.
Participating in this major effort to
assist ARMDI marks a coming of age
for the Jewish emigres, about 10,000
strong according to Jewish Family
Service estimates. The Jews had little
when they arrived, escaping reli-
gious persecution in Ukraine, Russia,
Belarus and other republics of the FSU.
"I was on the receiving end when
I came to this country:' said Tamara
Friedman, who arrived with Eugene

and their twin daughters, Edita and
Gabriella, more than 30 years ago from
Lvov (now Ukraine). She appreciates
the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan
Detroit's sponsorship. "People gave
money to bring us here. We were
helped and supported."
Today, she owns Tamara's Spa +
Wellness while her husband runs his
construction business.
The Gauzers left Kiev (now Ukraine)
in 1978, so their daughter, Lydia, could
have a normal Jewish upbringing.
The Jewish community helped them
settle in Oak Park. Manny Gauzer is
vice president of Normac, specializing
in the design and manufacturing of
precision-grinding machinery. Zoya
Gauzer, with her master's in printing
technology, worked in the computer
industry for more than 20 years.
Initially, the idea of Jews from the
FSU supporting an organized charity
was novel. "There were no charities in
Russia:' explained Tamara Friedman.
"If you had a friend in trouble, you
gave money, naturally, but the Russian
people never used to give."
As their community prospered,
however, many members became
interested in giving back to the Jewish
community. But where should they
place those efforts? The Jews' strong
attachment to Israel as a safe haven
hinted at the answer.

We want to keep you
safe and ticket free!

I

A20

Esther Allweiss Ingber

Special to the Jewish News

iN

. , civertisement

1403740

Eugene and Tamara Friedman

Manny and Zoya Gauzer

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