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August 21, 2008 - Image 71

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2008-08-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Arts & Entertainment

Newsworthy

CBS correspondent to comment on Israeli, American elections
at Greater Detroit Hadassah's opening meeting.

Suzanne Chessler
Special to the Jewish News

L

ongtime CBS radio newsman Dan
Raviv is one of those people who
keep their iPods handy — but his
listening preferences are a little offbeat.
While he has programmed his device
to play music such as the Beatles, Rolling
Stones and movie soundtracks, Raviv, 53,
actually prefers podcasts of news and cur-
rent affairs.
This broadcaster also likes being able
to add his own voice into the mix. His
weekly radio program, The CBS Weekend
Roundup, can be accessed as a podcast.
Raviv, who has served as a CBS cor-
respondent from Israel, continues to pay
close attention to issues facing that coun-
try and will give his perspective on U.S.-
Israel relations when he addresses this
season's opening meeting of the Greater
Detroit Chapter of Hadassah.
His topic is "How to Keep Your Best
Friend: Can Israel Count on America?"
noon Tuesday, Sept. 16, at Congregation
Shaarey Zedek in Southfield, where
Hadassah also will have diverse boutiques
running 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. to support
fundraising goals.
"I subscribe to the podcasts on my
computer and transfer them to my iPod,
and I'm a living link between the topics
of the U.S. and Israel: says Raviv, who
has spoken before groups representing
the Jewish Federation of Metropolitan
Detroit.
"When I speak, it's going to be 24
hours before the Kadima Party chooses
a replacement for [Prime Minister]
Ehud Olmert. If members can't form a
government, they'll have to call an elec-
tion around the time of the U.S. elec-
tion:'
Raviv, whose parents moved from Israel
to the United States in 1950, plans to dis-
cuss the impact of far-reaching decisions
made in both countries through the offi-
cials that are chosen.
"I can hardly remember any time like
this for Americans who are concerned
about Israel;' says Raviv, co-writing a
sequel to his bestselling book Every Spy
a Prince: The Complete History of Israel's
Intelligence Community.

take a look at programs on both sides,
they would learn from very impassioned
people'
Raviv, also co-writer of Friends In
Deed: Inside the U.S.-Israel Alliance, plans
to explore what actions John McCain or
Barack Obama might take toward Israel if
elected president. While he believes both
men will be friends of Israel, he thinks
that McCain would not be creative in
pushing a peace process.
"I've been spending most of my energy
on Obama vs. McCain this year:' explains
the journalist, who has won awards from
the Overseas Press Club of America
and Society of Professional Journalists.
"Usually it's not in the Middle East context
and not about Israel. It's just in general
and like any American political reporter
would do.
"I collect for my own interest and my
own book projects anything that is said
about the Middle East. In addition, in
Washington, I can cover whatever comes
up, such as the suicide of the scientist who
is alleged to have been the anthrax killer."
Raviv, married and the father two
aE
grown children, enjoys traveling and is
planning a trip to China.
"Radio has given me freedom and
autonomy:' Raviv explains about the work
that dominates his time. "Radio is much
more a one-person operation, while tele-
vision is much more teamwork with the
need for a camera crew, video editors and
Dan Raviv: "Radio has given me freedom and autonomy."
producers.
"While I have some producers who help
me
in gathering material and editors who
for
CBS
in
Boston
preceded
his
assign-
"Because we have decisions to make
help
in getting the material on the air, I do
ment
at
the
New
York
affiliate,
and
he
soon
and the Israelis have decisions to make,
the
writing
and most of the editing myself
was
writing
newscasts
heard
every
hour
at
I'm going to try to present all of those in
and
really
enjoy
that.
the
top
of
the
hour.
a broad brush portrayal and then go into
"When
a
story
really interests me, I'm
Raviv
became
an
on-air
correspondent
how they're all connected."
able
to
get
it
on
the
air in my way. I deal
for
radio
and
TV
from
Raviv's interest in
with
the
facts
and
try
to describe them in
Tel
Aviv
when
he
was
24.
journalism started

a
colorful
way"
After
years
of
working
when he was in high
as a foreign correspon-
school and continued
dent, he was named a
as he majored in gov-
Dan Raviv addresses the luncheon
Washington-based
nation-
ernment at Harvard,
meeting of the Greater Detroit
al
correspondent
for
the
where he became the
Chapter of Hadassah at noon
radio
network.
news director at the
- Dan Raviv
Tuesday, Sept.16, at Congregation
"I
tend
to
see
both
sides
university radio sta-
Shaarey Zedek, 27375 Bell Road, in
of
just
about
every
issue
tion.
Southfield. $45-$70. Call for reser-
says
Raviv,
whose
mother
is
a
member
After interning at the NBC-TV station in
vations by Aug. 29: (248) 683-5030.
of
Hadassah.
"I
watch
advocacy
journal-
Boston, he was hired as a part-time writer
ism,
but
ifs
not
my
style.
If
viewers
would
for a local all-news radio station. His work

"I tend to see both
sides of just about
every issue."

August 21 • 2008

C17

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