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October 18, 2007 - Image 82

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2007-10-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Arts & Entertainment

Ark Happenings

No matter where she is performing around
the world, Baltimore-born Jewish singer-
songwriter Sonia Rutstein is always striv-
ing to "disappear fear" and spread her mes-
sage of peace. She performed in a bomb
shelter in Israel in 2006 during the Israel-
Lebanon War while donating a guitar to a
Palestinian women's group called Flowers
Against the Occupation, aiming to replace
guns with guitars.
"It seems like generous spirited Jewish
lesbian singer-songwriter-guitarist Sonia
Rutstein has the potential to have a greater
impact for good on the Middle East than
the entire Bush administration:' wrote one
critic.
Sonia formed the music group
Disappear Fear with her sister Cindy in
the late 1980s. A decade later, Cindy retired

Sonia Rutstein

are $47.50. (734) 761-
from the road to
1451 or theark.org.
raise a family, and
("This Ark Is Your
Sonia, whose last
Ark: A Celebration and
studio CD was named
Tribute to the Spirit of
No Bomb Is Smart,
Woody Guthrie,' the
pushed on as a solo
r,
Ark's fall fundraiser,
act. She currently
features Odetta and
tours with other
the Ribbon of Highway
musicians, reviving
Gail Zimmerman
Endless Skyway
the country, blues,
Arts Editor
Artists and takes place
folk and reggae-fla-
Saturday, Nov. 10. For
vored harmonies of
Disappear Fear, whose latest album, Tango, information and tickets, call (734) 761-
1800 during business hours.)
includes songs in Arabic, Hebrew, Spanish
and English.
Sonia and Disappear Fear appear 7:30
Art In Ann Arbor
p.m. Sunday, Oct. 21, at the Ark in Ann
Ann Arbor singer-songwriter Dick Siegel,
Arbor. Tickets are $15. (734) 761-1451 or
known for musical compositions like
theark.org.
A first-class songwriter and entertaining "What Would Brando Do?" and "Angelo's
(eggs over easy);' takes his artistic talents
interpreter of contemporary folk tunes as
in a new direction with "The Art of Dick
well as traditional songs, ballads
Siegel," an exhibit of two-dimensional
and stories, Arlo Guthrie — the
son of folk icon Woody Guthrie and digital constructions on paper and bonded
aluminum composite.
his Jewish wife, Marjorie Mazia —
The exhibition runs Oct. 18-Nov. 29 at
is probably one of only a handful of
ARTSearch Satellite Gallery, 350 S. Main
people who've had a "hootenanny
St., Ste. 103, in Ann Arbor. Hours are 11
bar mitvzah'
a.m.-5 p.m. Wednesdays and 11 a.m.-9
The man who took us all to
p.m. Thursdays–Saturdays. There will be
Alice's Restaurant returns to the
an opening reception 6-9 p.m. Thursday,
Ark with a concert of song and
Oct. 18. For more information, call (734)
stories, titled "Solo Reunion Tour
— Together at Last" 8 p.m. Tuesday 769-3223.
For the past three years, University of
and Wednesday, Oct. 23-24. Tickets

Michigan Museum of Art has researched
its collections and a number of other U-M
campus collections as part of a worldwide
effort to restitute unlawfully confiscated
works of art by the Nazis.
UMMA Director James Steward will pres-
ent the project's most significant findings in
a program beginning 7:30 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 25, at the Michigan Theater, 603 E.
Liberty, in Ann Arbor. He also will inter-
view Lynn Nicholas, author of The Rape
Of Europa: The Fate of Europe's Treasures
in the Third Reich and the Second World
War, followed by a screening of the recent
documentary of the same name based on
Nicolas' book. Free. (734) 763-UMMA.

Roth Rocks

After an absence of 22 years, Jewish rocker
David Lee Roth returns to the Van Halen
lineup this fall for a North American tour,
making stops 8 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 20, at
Joe Louis Arena ($79.50 and $49.50) and
7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22 at the Palace
of Auburn Hills ($79.50 and $59.50).
Also performing will be guitarist Eddie
Van Halen, drummer Alex Van Halen and
Eddie's son (with actress Valerie Bertinelli),
Wolfgang, the hard rock-heavy metal
band's new bass player.
As reported in Scott Bernarde's Stars of
David, Roth, 53,"revealed the secret of his
success as one of rock's most engaging and

WS

Nate Bloom

Special to the Jewish News



Ins

Film Notes

Last year, Danish Jewish director
Susanne Bier's movie After the
Wedding earned an Oscar nomina-
tion for best foreign film.
In the last decade, Bier has
directed, and sometimes wrote, nine
Danish-language films; she is the
recipient of numerous European film
awards.
Bier's Jewish
mother was born
in Denmark; her
father's Jewish fam-
ily fled Germany for
Denmark in 1933.
Her parents, along
1
with most of the
Susanne Bier
Danish Jewish com-
munity, were evacuated to Sweden
in 1943 by the Danish Resistance,
just ahead of a planned Nazi round-
up.
Bier's first English-language film,
Things We Lost in the Fire, opens
Friday, Oct.19. Halle Berry co-stars

20C

October 18 a 2007

iN

as a middle-class woman whose
beloved husband (and father of her
two young children) is killed in a
holdup. Her husband's best friend
from childhood (Benicio Del Toro)
is a drug addict struggling to stay
clean.
Berry's character invites him to
rent a room from her, and gradually
their relationship deepens.
Rendition is a thriller whose title
references the practice of "extraor-
dinary rendition," in which terrorist
suspects are snatched up and taken
to a country where American law
does not apply. Reese Witherspoon
plays an American woman mar-
ried to an American-educated
Egyptian. He is subjected to "rendi-
tion" on very flimsy evidence. Jake
Gyllenhaal plays a CIA agent who
witnesses the Egyptian's torture-
filled interrogation.
Peter Sarsgaard, who is engaged
in real life to Jake's sister Maggie
Gyllenhaal (the couple had a child
together in 2006), plays an old
flame of Witherspoon whom she
enlists to help find her husband.

Sarsgaard works as an aide to a
powerful senator played by Alan
Arkin. The film opens Friday, Oct.
19.
Breaking her pledge never to
appear nude in films, Natalie
Portman shows her tush in Hotel
Chevalier, Wes Anderson's short film
prologue to his feature Darjeeling
Limited, also opening Friday, Oct.
19. Jason Schwartzman co-stars in
the short as well as in Darjeeling, in
which Portman has a cameo and in
which Schwartzman, Owen Wilson
and Adrien Brody star as three
brothers on a train trip across part
of India. Schwartzman, the son
of actress Talia Coppola Shire, is
Jewish on his father's side.
You have to pay to see Darjeeling
in theaters, but Hotel Chevalier is a
free download at hotelchevalier.com ,
then link to iTunes.
Hundreds of students turned-
out to see Portman when she
recently spoke at UC-Berkeley as
part of her campus tour promoting
the Foundation for International
Community Assistance, a nonprofit

microfinance organization.
The micro-loan movement has
really taken off, with several orga-
nizations offering opportunities for
Americans to make small business
loans to third-world people, even
picking online the person they (or
their group) wish to lend a small
sum to and tracking the borrower's
progress. See the Web site
www.villagebanking.org .

Pretty Woman

Mila Kunis, 23, the dark-haired
beauty who co-starred as Jackie
on the long-running series That
'70s Show, is now
filming Forgetting
Sarah Marshall,
another film com-
edy produced by
the red-hot Judd
Apatow (who seems
determined to keep
Mila Kunis
a lot of showbiz
Jews employed).
Written by Seth Rogen, the star
of Knocked-Up, it stars Kunis, Jason
Segal, Jonah Hill and Paul Rudd

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