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January 18, 2007 - Image 16

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2007-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

jcc maccabi

114 S

Metro

August 5-10, 2007 in Houston, TX
August 5-9, 2007 in Baltimore, MD*
August 12-17, 2007 in Orange County, CA

REMEMBERING DR. KING

Ages: 13-16 as of July 31, 2007

*12-14 as of July 31, 2007 Baltimore ONLY

Heschel's Legacy from page 15

jcc maccabi*

August 12-17, 2007 in Dear Park, NJ

Specialties include: Dance, Instrumental Music
(classical, rock/pop or jazz), Theater, Visual Arts,

Computer Graphics, Creative Writing, Vocal
Music, Radio Broadcasting

Ages: 13-18 or entering grades 8-12

Mandatory Information Meeting
For Parents and all interested participants

Sunday, January 21, 2007 — 5 p.m. • Jewish Community Center West Bloomfield

Meet the coaches, find out about sites, try-out schedules and other important
information for both the JCC Maccabi Games and JCC Maccabi ArtsFest.

Boys Baseball
Dance
Softball
Girls Basketball
Girls Soccer

Feb. 8 and Feb. 15
Jan. 28
Jan. 31 and Feb. 1
Jan. 24 and Jan. 30
Jan. 24 and
Jan. 29
12-14 Boys Soccer*
Jan. 23 and Jan. 30
Girls Volleyball
Feb. 7 and Feb. 14
Table Tennis
Jan. 28
12-14 Boys Basketball* Jan. 27 and Feb. 3
15-16 Boys Basketball Jan. 27 and Feb. 3
Inline Hockey
Jan. 28 - Feb. 4
Swimming
TBD
Track
TBD
Bowling
TBD
Golf
TBD
Tennis
TBD

TBD
3-5 p.m.
8:15-10 p.m.
8:15-9:45 p.m.
7-8 p.m.
8:15-9:45 p.m.
8:15-9:45 p.m.
8:15-10 p.m.
1-3 p.m.
7-9 p.m.
7-9 p.m.
9 am

Total Baseball, Wixom
Dance Studio
Gym
Gym
Inline Hockey Center
Gym
Gym
Gym
107 B & C
Gym
Gym
Inline Hockey Center

*These are the only sports allowing 12 year olds (as of July 31).

All Tryouts take place at the Jewish Community Center in West Bloomfield
unless otherwise noted.

Please go to our Web site www.MaccabiDetroitorg for the most up-to-date
tryout information.

;Iv.]
THE CENTER

Jewish Community Center of Metro Detroit
D. Dan & Betty Kahn Building
Eugene & Marcia Applebaum Jewish Community Campus
6600 West Maple Road • West Bloomfield, MI 48322
www.jccdet.org

1207460

DESIGNS IN
DECORATOR
WOOD &
LAMINATES, LTD.

It Doesn't Have To
Cost A Fortune...
Only Look Like It!

• Interior
Design Service
• Wall Units
• Bedrooms
• Dining Rooms
• Home Theatre

• Kitchens & Baths
• offices

• Woods
• Formica
• Stones
• Lucite • Glass

Lois Huron, Allied Member ASID • 248-851-69891

16 January 18 • 2007

ken opposition to the Vietnam War,
which ran afoul of conservative figures
at the seminary.
Nevertheless,
Rabbi Heschel's
legacy has aged
well. He is the
most frequently
cited rabbinic
source on issues
of social justice
and perhaps
is most widely
remembered
Rabbi Heschel
for the arrest-
ing photo of him
marching beside
leaders of the civil rights movement in
Selma, Ala., in 1965.
His influence is felt everywhere, from
the National Mall in Washington, where
thousands of Jews of all denominations
gathered last summer to protest the
atrocities unfolding in Darfur, Sudan,
to the slums of the Third World, where
American Jews now volunteer through
groups like the American Jewish
World Service, an organization whose
leader was influenced by her childhood
encounters with Heschel.
"He was very much a person who
enjoyed his Judaism and his scholarship
and made a huge effort to apply it to
the times in which he lived',' said AJWS
President Ruth Messinger. "And that
had a real impact on young and not-
so-young Jews at that time. And that's
something that we at AJWS continue to
do."
Rabbi Heschel was ahead of his time
in other ways, too. He was among the
first rabbis to energetically reach out
to leaders of other faiths, meeting with
Pope Paul VI at the Vatican in 1964
and becoming, in 1965, the first rabbi
appointed to the faculty of New York's
Union Theological Seminary, a liberal
Christian institution.
Along with Martin Buber, Rabbi
Heschel is the most widely read 20th-
century Jewish thinker at Christian
seminaries and bible colleges.
"More than any other single Jewish
author, his works have been absolutely
life-changing',' said Marvin Wilson, a
professor of bible and theology who
teaches a seminar on Heschel at Gordon
College, a Christian college in Wenham,
Mass.
Wilson says that next to the Bible,
Rabbi Heschel's God in Search of Man
is the most influential work he has ever
read.
"For Heschel, the God of scripture is
alive; he's dynamic, and he has pathos
toward humanity,' Wilson said. "That,

for Christians, is a very attractive con-
cept, that God is the reality to come to
grips with."
While some argue over what was
Rabbi Heschel's greatest achievement, it
was his legacy of political activism, and
in particular his friendship with King,
that made him an icon in the Jewish
community and beyond.
"They were kindred spirits," said
Rabbi Heschel's daughter, Susannah,
a professor of Jewish studies at
Dartmouth College.
After Rabbi Heschel's death in 1972,
the family was visited every Friday
afternoon for years by the rabbi of a
small Chasidic synagogue in Manhattan
where Heschel occasionally had prayed.
Susannah Heschel says her father felt
at home there, as it reminded him of his
childhood in Poland. It was that kind of
compassion, she says, that inspired him
to leave the comforts of the academy to
pursue his social-justice work.
"That moment, when Rabbi Cywiak
came to the door, was a reminder of
who my father really was',' she said. "And
in a sense, that was the moment of his
inner being, of his heart and his soul.
And it was out of that that he went to
march in Selma." [1, 7

Ethics Classes Set
A two-class series on the "Ethics of
Life and Death" from a Jewish perspec-
tive will be held 7 p.m. Sundays, Jan.
21 and 28, at 1578 Lakeside Drive in
Birmingham.
Rabbi Boruch Cohen, spiritual
leader of the Birmingham-Bloomfield
Chai Center, will teach.
The first session will cover stem cell
research and related topics, such as
cloning, in vitro fertilization and abor-
tion. The second will cover assisted
suicide, brain death and other end-of-
life issues.
Registration for the two-part series
is $20. For information, contact (248)
203-6721 or chai-rabbi@sbcglobal.net .

Kolel And Kabbalah
At 3 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 21, Professor
Howard N. Lupovitch will continue his
seven-part Kolel Moshe lecture series
at Congregation B'nai Moshe.
"A History of Kabbalah — Its Uses,
Misuses and Abuses" will discuss the
discovery of Kabbalah by Christian
scholars in Renaissance Italy and the
Maharal of Prague and the Golem.
Cost is $12. There is no charge for
high-school students, college students,
or adult learners with Kolel Moshe
Passport to Torah.

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