100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

September 28, 2006 - Image 47

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2006-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

wishes you a Healthy, Happy
& Peaceful New Year!

Fall 2006...

Relocating to 130 West 14 Mile Rd.
at Pierce in Birmingham

*Complimentry private parking

248.642.8181

eg-B3 0

Dorfman, who was a graduate student
at Syracuse University when he met
the artist during a guest-lecture pro-
gram.
"He never really went to high school.
He went to Hebrew Tech when he was a
teenager and was going to be a drafts-
man. When he got interested in art, his
father threw him out.
"Milton became the elevator boy at
the American Artists School, and they
gave him a little place in the building so
that he could paint. He lived by selling
blood, modeling and doing odd jobs:"
Dorfman explains that Resnick did
some painting for the government,
served in the armed forces for five
years and resumed his life as a painter
after World War II.
"Milton was going to be very suc-
cessful at one point, but the pop art
revolution happened in. 1962 and
wiped serious painting off the map','

says Dorfman, whose book is based on
Resnick's talks as well as interviews and
debates with other artists and critics.
"He was in an artists' community
where everybody became familiar
with what the other people were doing,
and that's how they got their bearings.
People started looking at his work
because he was part of that milieu,
but he didn't have his first show until
1955."
Resnick, who increased the size
of the former synagogue entrance
because he liked to do enormous paint-
ings, also wrote poetry and read the
Russian classics, according to Dorfman.
The author explains that Resnick and
Passlof, who also is Jewish, remained
close even though they lived apart; they
never had children.
Although the late artist remained
connected to his Jewish background,
he discounted the notion of a Supreme
Being interested in individuals and
never painted with religious themes.
"Milton's approach to painting gave
rise to an art of sensibility and plastic- -
ity," Dorfman says. "It was increasingly
meditative in nature as he aged." —

"Milton Resnick: Back on
10th Street" will be on view
• Sept. 30-Nov. 25 at the David
Klein Gallery, 163 Townsend,
in Birmingham. Gallery hours
are 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Mondays-
Saturdays. An opening day
reception runs 5-8 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 30. (248) 433-
3700.

ANY DINNER
SPECIAL
$599

Siegetto Ueei

Milton Resnick: Storage, 1958, oil on canvas:

3426 E. West Maple Rd.

at Haggerty Rd.

(248) 926-9555

1
I
*With coupon.
Expires Oct. 19, 2006.
I Coupon good at Siegel's Deli and Boris's Deli. I

I

1

r

1

1
1

Dine-in or Carry-Out

20°1 ° OFF I

DAIRY
TRAYS
13? ?ER

it

I

INCLUDES A FRESH FRUIT TRAY

TOTAL FOOD BILL 'I

PERSON

*With coupon.
Expires Oct. 19 2006.
I Coupon good at Siegel's Deli and Boris's Deli.

"With coupon.
Expires Oct. 19, 2006.
Coupon good at Siegel's Deli and Boris's Deli.

ll

I.

OttEg $5,95

E 0 R E NIA

W:

I

L1177 2

THE CENTER
FES1TVAI.
jPNISii

"Howard Triest's journey is unique and epical, but it is also a journey through well-traversed territory. My hope is that the
familiar material in JOURNEY is presented in a way that is creative, respectful and emotionally meaningful. JOURNEY is a
film that deals with identity-defining Jewish themes and issues." —Steve Palackdharry, director

Tickets at the door or call 248.432.5577.

September 28 2006

47

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan