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October 20, 2005 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2005-10-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

First Round

About Last Week..

Two news snippets: from
Neo-Nazis to King Abdullah.

Not So Good

Meet one of the faces of success

injured or pinched by
police, but on the same
day that Louis
Farrakhan gathered his
flock at the Million More
March in Washington,
D.C., the story that made
headlines in Sunday
newspapers around the
country had a Toledo,
Ohio, dateline.

is hard to judge
who's more despi-
cable, the 12 mem-
bers of the neo-nazi
National Socialist
Movement who
marched in Toledo on
Oct. 15 or some of the Harry Kirsbaum
protesters who
Columnist
responded by looting
and burning businesses in the
same neighborhood.
The results: 114 protesters
Not So Fast
arrested β€” 34 of them juveniles
Barbara Walters interviewed
β€” with charges including aggra- Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah on
vated rioting, burglary, felonious
ABC's 20/20 Oct 14.
assault, carrying a concealed
Democracy, reform and
weapon, failure to disperse,
women's rights came up in the
obstruction and resisting arrest.
conversation.
According to the Toledo Blade,
During the country's first-ever
the reason for the march was
election in 2004, some people
under dispute, but could be the
could vote on some things.
result of an argument among
Women were not allowed to
next-door neighbors over a
vote because, after all, they are
fence.
women; and the king was not on
"Police began to learn last
the ballot, because, after all, he's
week that large numbers of gang
the king.
members would attend the
Women can't drive, get a
march to protest against and
degree or have surgery without a
possibly clash with the neo-Nazi
man's permission, but the king
group members who came, they
told Barbara he was a reformer,
have said, to 'protest black crimi-
and these things take time.
nal behavior," said the Oct. 17
"I believe the day will come
story.
when women will drive," he said.
I hate neo-Nazis as much as
"The issue will require patience.
the next guy, and I'm all for con-
In time I believe it will be possi-
fronting hatred the old-fashioned ble. And I believe patience is a
way, but if the police prevent me
virtue!"
from fighting the Nazis, my natu-
The king showed his openness
ral inclination isn't to think,
by allowing Walters, known as an
"Well, as long as I'm here, I might infidel woman to some of his
as well torch a saloon and loot a
more conservative-thinking sub-
couple of convenience stores!"
jects, to interview him.
In this case, the Nazis got
He also has departed from the
exactly what they wanted. Not
practice of having people kiss his
only did none of their group get
hand to show respect. He still
holds hands with those people he
considers friends, like the
famous picture taken of him and
President Bush on the Crawford
ranch last summer.
I wonder what American con-
servative-thinking subjects like
the Rev. Donald Wildmon of the
American Family Association
thinks of that picture?

I

❑

President Bush and King Abdullah

in Crawford, Texas, in April.

October 20 2005

Physician enjoys
mentoring young
people

Harry Kirsbaum's e-mail address is
hkirsbaum@thejewishnews.com

Irvin Kappy, M.D., is a board-
certified pediatrician at the
Henry Ford Medical Center-
West Bloomfield.

Dr. Kappy has a passion for
working with young people. In
addition to his thriving pedi-
atric practice, Dr. Kappy heads
up the medical center's highly
successful Medical Mentorship
program.

More than 150 students have
participated in the program,
which began in partnership with
nearby West Bloomfield High
School. Now in its sixth year, the
program has been expanded to
include students from the Jewish
Academy of Metropolitan Detroit
and Troy High School.

The program pairs advanced-
level science students with Henry
Ford medical professionals who
volunteer their time to acquaint
students with their day-to-day
activities. The students shadow
their mentors for the school
year, observing routine clinic
visits, surgery and state-of-the
art technologies.

"Quite a few of the early partici-
pants are now medical stu-
dents," Dr. Kappy says. "They
tend to stay in touch with their
mentors to keep them updated
on their progress. Personally, I
find it gratifying that several are
concentrating on pediatric
medicine. I think their experience
β€’in this program will better prepare
them for eventually entering the
field of medicine."

Dr. Kappy is one of six pediatri-
cians at the West Bloomfield
medical center, which employs
700 specialists, care providers
and support staff in a multitude
of specialties.

a medical
family," he
says.

Growing up
in metro
Detroit as the
child of
Holocaust
survivors,
Kappy had
his heart set on becoming a
doctor. He obtained his medical
degree at Michigan State
University and completed his
pediatric internship and resi-
dency at Children's Hospital
and Research Center of
Oakland in California.

"Working with children is very
fulfilling, even when they're ill,"
he says. "They tend to be very
straightforward about what's
ailing them and they are
anxious to participate in the
treatment options. Working
with parents is also quite
satisfying."

He also says he enjoys watching
his patients grow up.

"We begin seeing these kids
when they're infants," he notes,
"As they grow through their
elementary school years and
become teen-agers, it's great to
see their development. I get to
see patients I treated as new-
borns heading off to college and
becoming adults."

Dr. Kappy has a long history of
community involvement, hav-
ing served as a board member
for both Jewish Family Services
and the Jewish Community
Center. He has been a physician
at Camp Tamarack for in years,
and is the community liaison
for the Jewish Community
Council and Kids Kicking
Cancer.

"I enjoy working with the entire
team of specialists at the Henry
Ford West Bloomfield center.
After all these years, we're like

For more information or to make an
appointment call i-Soo-HENRYFORD or
visit our Web site www.lienri/ford .coni

1035200

9

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