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September 15, 2005 - Image 33

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2005-09-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

‘44Vr

N DS
HURRICANE
KATRI NA

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Helping Hand

The Jewish Fund supports three new programs.

HARRY MRS BAUM

Staff Writer

T

-

he Jewish Fund, created in
1996 from the proceeds of the
sale of Sinai Hospital to the
Detroit Medical Center, announced
$970,000 in grants this year that will
benefit 16 health and human service
agencies in metropolitan Detroit.
Included in the grants are programs
to reach across cultural lines, give sup-
port to Holocaust survivors and pro-
vide programs for Orthodox seniors.
• Grants totaling $20,000 will go to
the National Conference for
Community and Justice for a program
that will send middle school students in
the Detroit metropolitan area to the
Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn,
Shalom Street at the Jewish Community
Center in West Bloomfield, the
Museum of African American History in
Detroit and the Arab American National
Museum in Dearborn.
The program "provides a way for
youngsters to learn about other cul-
tures by going to these museums," said
Daniel Krichbaum, NCCJ executive
director. The first-year goal is to take
students from about 40 middle
schools on tours of all four museums,
followed by classroom discussions.
"The Jewish Fund money will help us
hire a coordinator who will work with
middle schools in Oakland, Wayne and
Macomb counties," said Krichbaum.
"Middle school is a time when biases
and prejudices haven't yet been formed.
It's a good time for a human relations
organization like the NCCJ to help
them understand and respect people
who are different from them."
• Over three years, $60,000 in
grants will provide in-home services
for Holocaust survivors, including Yad
V'yad (Hand-in-Hand), which gives
psycho-social support to survivors at

home, said Dr. Charles Silow, director
of the Jewish Home and Aging
Services Program for Holocaust
Survivors and Families.
The plan is to train a core of volun-
teer paraprofessionals to visit
Holocaust survivors who are shut-ins
or ill, who are feeling lonely or
depressed and need companionship or
friendship, he said.
"We'll be writing a training manual
and conducting training sessions for
volunteers to become paraprofession-
als," he said. "We'll be identifying sur-
vivors in need and arrange matches
with volunteers."
• A three-year $52,000 grant will
assist a program that provides healthy
Orthodox seniors the opportunity to
attend classes, work out and enroll in
volunteer projects.
A new program called the Council of
Orthodox Jewish Active Retirees
(COJAR) will work together with the
Jewish Community Center in Oak Park
to provide physical fitness and craft
classes, Jewish and cultural classes and a
volunteer component beginning Nov. 1,
said Esther Posner, COJAR chairperson.
A sample daily schedule will offer
crafts and separate workouts for men
and women in the morning, a kosher
lunch followed by two cultural or
Jewish lectures by Orthodox teachers,
followed by Minchah prayers, and
ending with a volunteer activity.
The schedule will run on Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the
cost will be $100 a year. It also requires
at least a $72 annual cultural member-
ship at the JCC, said Posner. "The
Jewish Fund is allowing us to keep the
cost really manageable for most people."
"A Taste of COJAR," a one-day kick
off event, will be held 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sept. 20 at the JCC in Oak Park.
Contact Sarah Berkowitz, (248) 967-
4030.

an evening to support the
UJC Humanitarian Relief Fund

Thursday ■ September 22 is 7p
at

139 S. Old Woodward ■ Birmingham

nEntorr =WISE NEWS

JN

FEDERATION'S

YAD

YOUNG
ADULT
DIVISION

ADONAI DiAD

One Lora

THANK GOD FOR ISRAEL

LUNCHEON

DATE: Sunday, November 6, 2005
TIME: 1:00 P.M.— 3:00 PM.

PLACE: Novi Sheraton, 21111 Haggerty Road (north of Eight Mile)

TOPIC:

WHY ITHANK GOD FOR ISRAEL

Speakers will be Rev.Terry Rudd, Rev. Bob Shirock,
and Rev. Peter Carlson.

This complimentary luncheon is sponsored by area evangelical churches,
including Highland Park Baptist Church, Southfield; Oakpointe Church,
Novi; and First Baptist Church,White Lake.

For reservations, contact Tim Munger at
248-661-7533 or 248-730-2566.

CwQ

Kosher meals are available if requested by Monday, October 31.

1015610

9/15
2005

33

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