100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 24, 2004 - Image 60

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2004-12-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Welcome to the
state of independence

stith

$1000 GM BONUS CASH

FALL PULL-AHEAD PROGRAM'

2005 SAAB 9-2X UNEAR SEDAN

On Donner, On
$ 99* Blitzen, On Moshe .1..

24 Mo. Lease

INSUKANC E.13 ■ LC

Mt

mum

, SWEPT'

IIHS Double
Best Pick•

2005 SAAB 9-3
UNEAR SEDAN

91 8 9*

24 Mo. Lease

2004 SAAB 9-SAERO
SPORT SEDAN

125*

24 Mo. Lease

24 mo. lease. I 2K miles per year. Sec. deposit waived based on approved credit. 9-2 ttl. due $1,420 9-5 and 9-3 ttl. due $1,000.
Must have Oldsmobile owner loyalty and qualify for GMS pricing. All rebates assigned to dealer.
$1.000 GMS bonus cash incld. in pymts. -Must be GM employee, supplier or qualified family member
tGMAC/SFSC with maturity dates between Nov. 1,2004 - Feb. 28, 2005.

GLOSSMOM SORB

On Telegraph Road At The Tel-I2 Mall, Southfield

1-888-306-5188

907429

4,
• 1 -111 -4 '474

4

15.

Wedding And Party Specialists
Flowers For All Occasions

OF NATURE
STATE T
FLOWERS

(248) 559-5424
(888) 202-4466 Fax: (248) 559-5426
29115 Greenfield, Southfield, MI 48076

V

866910

I

miss sitting on
the steps.
It happens
every Christmas,
and I know it's
ridiculous to think
that a Jewish
columnist would
miss anything at all
HARRY
about the Yuletide
KI RS BAUM
season, but let me
Columnist
explain.
As a struggling
bond trader in Chicago 15 years ago,
I shared a desk with Denny, 10 years
my senior chronologically, but 25
years my senior in stability.
Denny, an Irish-Catholic, was a
broker, married with three high
school-aged boys and a home in the
suburbs.
I was a Jewish, single, full-time
trader and part-time bartender, living
in a fourth-floor walk-up apartment
in the city. He was a little bit coun-
try; I was a little bit rock and roll.
We got to know each other during
fast-food lunches, on slow trading
days and while sharing newspapers.
We found a common thread in read-
ing spy thrillers, watching violent
movies and laughing — a lot.
One erev"Christmas, he asked me
what I was doing for the holiday.
I told him I'd probably stay home
and watch the tube.
He invited me to his house and
kept insisting, even though he knew I
was Jewish, no one should be alone
on Christmas Eve.
"Just come over to the house, and
you'll meet my family," he said.
"We'll have some good food and
Heinekens, and you'll have a great
time."
I didn't want to go, but reluctantly,
I said I'd drop by.
I wasn't that Jewish, but I wasn't
Irish-Catholic either.
When I got home and found my
car wouldn't start, I called him with
the perfect excuse. He had the perfect
reply.
"Take the train until the end of the
line, and we'll pick you up," he said.
"Pack an overnight bag."

I stopped at the store for a bottle of
wine and rented a Steven Seagal
video.
At the party, I walked into a
Norman Rockwell painting — a large
all-American family. It was a painting
that included Heinekens.
I grabbed some dinner and a beer
and made myself comfortable on the
steps leading into his living room.
Denny joined me, and as we sat
there I met everyone in the room. We
stayed up late, and I fell asleep in a
spare bedroom.
The next morning, I woke up to
the sound of his wife's new Dirt
Devil.
During breakfast, we watched the
video. They insisted I stay until the
presents were opened, and I was more
than surprised when some presents
— 10 paperbacks, individually
wrapped — had my name on them.
When they drove me home that
day, I knew that I had made a life-
long friend.
Until I moved away eight years ago,
I had spent every Christmas Eve on
those living room steps and every
Christmas morning exchanging pres-
ents and watching videos — the
bloodier the better — before they
went to church.
What he did for me a dozen years
ago was a mitzvah, and I hope he
knows that if he ever finds himself
alone on the first night of Passover,
he is welcome to break some matzah
with me. No one should be alone
during the first seder.
Religious doctrine aside, Christmas
and Chanukah share the themes of
miracles, of peace, of love for family.
We believe the world's problems
can be solved a little bit at a time.
We believe love for your fellow
man can reach across borders and
religions, as long as you take the time
to see similarities instead of differ-
ences.
We want peace, health and happi-
ness, and a good life for those we
love.
We also want Osama bin Laden's
head on a stick.

Harry Kirsbaum's e-mail address is
hkirsbaurn@thejewishnews.com

2001.

Originally published online December

12/24
2004

60

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan