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December 03, 2004 - Image 52

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2004-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Festival Of Books

For Chanukah, say, "I love you," with a book that speaks

Year

of jEIVI

Inside Anne Frank's House

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EDITED

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RUTH REICHL

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GAIL ZIMMFRMAN
Arts e- Entertainment Editor

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12/ 3
2004

52

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FOR THE GOURMAND
For The Gourmet Cookbook (Houghton Mifflin;
$40), edited by Ruth Reichl, the editors of one of
America's foremost food magazines went back
through more than 60,000 recipes Gourmet has
published over the past six decades. They chose
what they considered to be the best — 1,200 in all
— and came up with this hefty volume (weighing in
at 5 lbs., 2 oz. and 1,056 pages), which includes all
the great American foods as well as dishes from
around the world. Hundreds of useful sidebars, on
how to throw a cocktail party, for example, fill the
book — but no photographs.
"Nothing like this has ever been done before,"
says Reichl. "For this book we went back to the very
beginning, retesting all of our favorite recipes. We
even had cook-offs between various versions of each
dish, just to make sure the one we chose was the
very best. The chocolate cake alone took weeks."

Reichl, a graduate of the University of Michigan,
is editor in chief at Gourmet.
The former New York Times food critic, famous
for wearing disguises and avoiding photographers,
also is the author of two best-selling memoirs,
Tender at the Bone and Comfort Me with Apples.

FOR THE MUSEUM GOER
Countless tourists to Amsterdam have made a pil-
grimage to 263 Prinsengracht, to the secret annex in
the house that hid Anne Frank and her family dur-
ing World War II and was opened to the public as a
museum in 1960.
In the oversized volume Inside Anne Frank's House:
An Illustrated Journey Through Anne's World
(Overlook Duckworth; $55), readers can trace the
path taken by visitors to the shrine where Anne
wrote her famous diary, following the same route
taken by visitors on a physical tour. Through photo-
graphs — 219 in black and white and 159 in color
— the life of the inhabitants of the secret annex, the
four employees of Anne's father, Otto Frank, and

L.

AND FRIENDS

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their Amsterdam neighborhood are brought to life,
with the addition of background information by the
museum directors and designers.
In his introduction to the book, Hans Westra,
executive director of the Anne Frank House, writes:
"Today people are still being persecuted and mur-
dered because, they, just like Anne, are not only 'dif-
ferent' but also 'want to be.' This makes a visit to
the Anne Frank House meaningful, also in our
times.

FOR THE STORYTELLER
A Year of Jewish Stories: 52 Tales for Children and
Their Families (UAHC-URJ Press; $29.95), by
Grace Ragues Maisel and Samantha Shubert, is a
new collection of stories — one for each week of
the year — that will help families explore Jewish val-
ues while creating positive Jewish memories.
Organized around the Jewish calendar, the book
contains stories — coming from Jewish tradition
but retold with a modern sensibility — for every
Jewish holiday and for the weeks in between. For

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