100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

November 05, 2004 - Image 59

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2004-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

it's all in the Mix

Foley
Tarina Taranitino
Industrial Inc.
2 Love
DAF
Pretty Punk

Brandolini
Bytina XXX
Sky
Frankie B
Noir
Gauin

clothier for men & women

Ya Ya
Miguelina
Joystick
Sacred Blue Jeans
HSU
Soya

BOOK LOOK

M OAN FOR THE

HOLIDAYS

340 E. Maple
Birmingham, MI 48009

KITCHENS by QICHAQD6

912 6outh Old Woodward — Birmingham, MI -
www latchembyrichard8 com

x

248-645-2778

Alma • Rob- erto Cava!li allk
' D&G • Geox • Primigi
Shoe b.e doo • Simonetta

pill • Fri 10m45,30pm • Sat lOarti.,;Sprn

r\o-iTictor
our ior ie,

0 -

2 hours free parking in the decks
www.enjoybirmingham.com • 248-433-3550

Sunj I 2prn-3pm

J

oan Nathan, chef and
showperson, doesn't stop
with tradition when it
comes to foods having a
Jewish heritage. She perpetually
scouts, adds and shares fresh
approaches to what she has learned
and tried.
Nathan's sharing comes through
books, TV appearances and maga-
zine articles, with her latest project
being a text of recipes and related
narration — Joan Nathan's Jewish
Holiday Cookbook (Schocken Books;
$29.95).
The new publication — coming in
at more than 500 pages — combines
revisions from two earlier projects on
their way to becoming classics, The
Jewish Holiday Kitchen and The Jewish
Holiday Baker. The new release is
being brought to the public on the
25th anniversary of the kitchen tome.
"Food is a lot more than just a
recipe," says Nathan, a University of
Michigan graduate. "I hope people
will try the recipes, experiment and
learn something."
Part of the learning has to do with
the use of traditional recipes as
adapted in various countries or by
innovative friends, including owner-
baker Ben Moskovitz of Star Bakery
in Oak Park.
While Nathan offers a basic recipe
for potato latkes to celebrate
Chanukah, she also includes
Romanian Zucchini Potato Latkes,
the Russian Pashtida raisin-cinnamon
latkes and Ada Shoshan's Apple
Latkes.
Nathan, in her narrative about the

Festival of Lights and its savored
foods, writes:
"For American Jews intrigued
with the gastronomic side of
Judaism, Chanukah appears to be
the preferred holiday. It is difficult to
equal the taste of brown, crisp potato
latkes. Can gefilte fish, matzah balls,
charoset or even hamantashen corn-
pare with them? Certainly not."
Just a sparse sampling of the
recipe adaptations — all with a his-
tory — includes low-cholesterol chal-
lah for the Sabbath, seven-fruit
charoset from Surinam for Passover
and Viennese tortes for Shavuot. In
addition, Nathan provides holiday
menus to appropriately place her
recipes.
— Suzanne Chessler, special writer



-

Ngerffill11,11

ADA SHOSHAN'S
APPLE LATKES
Makes about 36 latkes
(dairy or parve)

2 eggs, well beaten
1 1/2 cups orange juice, yogurt or
milk
2 cups all-purpose flour
1 t. baking powder
Dash of salt
1/4-1/2 cup sugar, depending on
taste
3 medium apples, peeled and
coarsely grated
Vegetable oil for frying
Confectioners' sugar
1. Mix the eggs with the orange
I ,
"juice, yogurt or milk in a bowl.
2. In a separate bowl, combine. '
the flour, baking powder, salt and
sugar. Add the dry ingredients to the
egg mixture along with the grated
apples. Heat a thin layer of oil in a
skillet. Allowing 1 large tablespoon of
batter per latke, drop into the hot oil.
Cook about 2 minutes on each side
or until slightly golden.
3. Drain on paper towels. Sprinkle
Otwith confectioners' sugar and serve.
— from Joan Nathan's "Jewish
Holiday Cookbook"

JNPLATINUM •

NO\ EMBER 20114 •

7

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan