100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

March 05, 2004 - Image 75

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2004-03-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

•-*

Securing Funds

OUR NEW HOURS
Monday-Thursday 4pm- 1 Opm
Friday 4pm-11 pm
Saturday 4pm- 11 pm
Sunday 4pn-t-9prn

Leaders differ on whether to seek government aid
to keep synagogues and other Jewish sites safe.

MATTHEW E. BERGER
Jewish Telegraphic Agency

I

New York

t soon could be a conundrum
for American Jews: Should ,
communities allow govern-
ment money into synagogues
in order to keep terrorists out?
Behind the scenes at this year's
Jewish Council for Public Affairs
plenum, officials debated how to rec-
oncile separation between church
and state with the growing need for
money to ease soaring post-Sept. 11
security costs.
Especially contentious is whether
money should go to synagogues and
day schools.
"We are working diligently to try
and reach a consensus," said Charles
Konigsberg, vice president for public
policy at the United Jewish
Communities, umbrella group for
North American federations.
UJC likely will look to the annual
Homeland Security appropriations in
Congress in the coming weeks for
security assistance for non-profit
organizations. ,
U.S. Sen. Joseph Lieberman, D-
Conn., ranking minority member of
the Senate Governmental Affairs
Committee, may be a key ally on
this issue, insiders say.
The project could partner Jewish
groups with hospitals, museums, the
American Red Cross, and, possibly,
mosques.
According to several sources,
Jewish organizations are in almost
complete agreement that seeking
loan guarantees from the federal gov-
ernment for security costs would not
violate their perception of church-
state separation, because no direct
federal aid would go to the organiza-
tions. However, some are specifically
pushing for grants instead of or in
addition to the guarantees.
Some more liberal Jewish groups
either are pushing for the Jewish
community to focus on the loan
guarantees or to set up a two-tier
system proposing aid to federation
buildings and other community serv-
ice centers, along with loan guaran-
tees to religious institutions.
Others counter that such a system

would make synagogues and relij
gious buildings second-class institu-
tions.
The Bush administration has
heavily touted faith-based initiatives
and other venues to allow religious
groups to seek federal dollars.
While the Orthodox community
has embraced such proposals enthu-
siastically, most Jewish groups have
opposed them or been uncertain.
Jewish leaders opposing faith-
based initiatives worry that this
exception could set a precedent.
Speaking at a JCPA forum, Rabbi
David Saperstein, executive director
of the Religious Action Center of
Reform Judaism, said the issue of
federal aid for security was "on the
cusp" of dicey issues of church-state
separation.
"You can look at this as direct
government funding of houses of
worship and parochial schools, some-
thing the Supreme Court has never
upheld and which raises serious con-
stitutional issues for separationists,"
he said. "On the other hand, it raises
the issue of extraordinary circum-
stances in which the government is
paying for things which would not
have been required to be done by
houses of worship if not for extraor-
dinary circumstances."
Even those who do not support
seeking federal aid say they under-
stand the rationale for the exemption
from long-standing Jewish public
policy and are likely not to contest
openly the majority's decision.

stta
u 4i s it a a ;
Fermi ngtowfigadgi.
West

BEANIES • DELI

& COFFEE HOUSE

Home of the $5 Corned Beef Sandwich
Fresh Bagels Daily • Party Trays • Lunch Delivery Available

Buy 1 Deli Sandwich at regular

33214 W. 14 Mile Rd
(corner of 14 & Farmington)

price and get 50% OFF 248-626-7393
a 2nd deli sandwich with coupon

Fax: 248-626-0216

expires 611104

1.1-111 BAN D

FREE IN-HOME APPOINTMENTS
ANY NORMAL SIZE TABLE for ONE LOW PRICE

STARTING $4
AT

9

95

BIB
FROM 510.95

WASHABLE TOP
INSULATED

Quality Table Pad Co. • 1-248-652-0248

Serving All of Southeast Michigan for Over 19 Years

hone service includin. Sunda . No mail or .hone measurements. All F.O.B. Facto . Man other •ualities at reduced.ricer

REGISTERED ELECTROLOGISTS

Come and let us remove your unwanted
hair problem and improve your appearance.

Near 12 Mile Rd. between Evergreen & Southfield
Ask for Debby at 248.559.1969 (Appointment Only)

11111111011111MagnistilitiMMINNEVERNEMEMINIVEIE



• Beautiful Judaica • Support Israel
• Gifts for All Occasions • Kiddush- Cups
• Shabbat Candlesticks • Challah Covers •
The Sugar Tree Plaza

Relating To Young'
Lunchtime Lecture

Ohr Somayach Detroit will present a
one-hour lunch and learn-with
Rabbi Dovid Orlofsky at 12:30 p.m.
Monday, March 15, at Franklin
Fitness and Racquet Club, 29350
Northwestern, Southfield.
Rabbi Orlofsky will speak on
"Relating To Our Children —"
Understanding the Four Sons."
The $18 charge includes lunch
and valet parking. RSVP: (248) 352-
4870; e-mail: ohrk@speedlink.net

Orchard Lake Rri, N. of Maple

• West Bloomfield

248132-3377

FENBYSTEIN
ENTERTAINMENT

BANDS,

DJ.S,

CEREMONY MUSIC & NOVELTY ITEMS

(248)474

I

fMv
o

.

3/ 5

www.fenhysteinentertainment.com

812430

2004

Jerry Fenbr Band

63

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan