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February 20, 2004 - Image 50

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2004-02-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Human Beatbox

University of Illinois.
"I will portray 10 different characters and
then do a beatbox workshop with the kids
in the audience," says Lane, 32, known for
Yuri Lane performs family show at Shalom Street. making
drumming sounds with his mouth.
"This
is
going to be a high-energy program
SUZANNE CHESSLER
with the first part lasting about a half hour."
Special to the Jewish News
Lane, who will have no costume changes, is
known
for inventing different sounds for different
one-man show about King Solomon and
shows.
He
particularly enjoys making noises associ-
his legendary connection with animals —
ated
with
animals.
communicated with a hip-hop beat —
"I've always been fascinated with King Solomon and
will be featured 2 and 4 p.m. Sunday,
what
has been written about him," says Lane, who has
Feb. 22, at Shalom Street at
been teaching at Jewish schools and developing
the Jewish Community Center
programs for adults using his vocally made percus-
in West Bloomfield.
sion sounds.
Yuri Lane, a Chicago-based
One such program, From Tel Aviv to Ramallah,
entertainer, will act out - all the
introduces
two characters, one from Israel and
characters in his musical the-
another
from
the Palestinian territories, to give dif-
ater piece Building Solomon's
ferent
perspectives
on the problems in the Mideast.
Temple. The presentation, filled
It also uses Lane's "beatbox" vocals and hip-hop
with mime and dance, was
rhythms to convey the emotions on both sides.
planned with the entertainer's
"I become my own drummer," says Lane,
wife, Rachel Havrelock, who
who
first learned about urban rhythms growing
was raised in Michigan and
Yuri
Lane:
"I
become
up
in
the counter-culture Haight-Asbury dis-
teaches Jewish studies at the
my own drummer"
trict of San Francisco.

He liked break-dancing and taught it at middle
school parties during the 1980s, the same years
he worked on advancing the use of his unusual
vocal sounds.
Acting started at age 12, when Lane was cast in
plays produced by the American Conservatory
Theater in San Francisco. He went on to study clas-
sical and musical theater at the Pacific Conservatory
for the Performing Arts.
Even with work in commercials and on the TV
series Nash Bridges and Party of Five, Lane continued
with his beatbox shows, including the one-man musi-
cal Soundtrack City.
"When the kids hear the sounds in the King
Solomon piece, they'll see some pictures in their
minds," Lane says. "At the end of the show, they'll
learn melodies and songs. I've been touring this show
this past year and have had lots of fun with it." ❑

Vatican Treasures

Lama as a gift to John Paul II.
Also featured is a bronze hand cast of the Pope, who
was encouraged by Kluger to have it made so that
exhibit visitors may press their hands into it and expe-
rience some personal contact with the religious leader.
"This Pope has special ties with the Jews," says
Kluger, whose mother and sister died in Auschwitz.
"He is a man of reconciliation."
Kluger, who had been in the import-export busi-
ness and traveled to the Dettoit area as part of that,
believes that Jews will enjoy experiencing the Catholic
culture represented in this display, which was organ-
ized and circulated by Art Services International of
Virginia in conjunction with the Governatorato of
the Vatican City State and the Office of the Patrons
of the Arts in the Vatican Museums. •
"There's a beautiful catalog that goes along with
this exhibit," says Kluger, who recalls the Pope as a
youngster, playing ball, enjoying music, writing
lyrics and visiting the Kluger home to listen to the
radio. "There's so much to see."

A

America. Cincinnati is one of four
stops for more than 300 objects that
trace 2,000 years of church leadership.
Jewish Catholic cooperation brings exhibit to U.S.
"Every piece in this exhibit is a piece
of history," says Kluger, 84, who peri-
odically is invited to the Vatican to visit
SUZANNE CHESSLER
with
his
friend
from
childhood. "The vast majority of
Special to the Jewish News
these items are not seen by the public. Only the people
who work with them or on special visits have seen
Jewish-Italian Holocaust survivor helped
parts of this collection."
bring an exhibit from the
The exhibit includes master-
Vatican to America with the
works
of gold and silver, marble
help of a longtime personal
sculptures, embroidered silk
friend — Pope John Paul II.
vestments, papal jewels and
Jerzy Kluger, whose friendship with the
paintings. The items are organ-
Catholic leader started in a Polish kinder-
ized into 12 sections with each
gartenand was renewed in Italy after
section in interactive settings
World War II, urged the Pope to approve
and re-created environments.
the tour of art and historical treasures.
Individual highlights include
The exhibit idea came from Americans
Giotto's mosaic Bust of an Angeh
involved with the book The Hidden Pope,
Michelangelo's figure studies for
by Darcy O'Brien (Rodale Press; 1998;
the Sistine Chapel ceiling,
$20.95), which described the friendship
Bernini's terra-cotta sculpture
between the two men of different faiths.
Charity with Four Putti, the papal
"Saint Peter and the Vatican: The
tiara of Pope Pius IX with the
Legacy of the Popes," which will be
symbol of the papacy made of
shown through April 18 at the
precious stones and a Buddhist
Cincinnati Museum Center at Union
Thanka
of embroidered cloth
Terminal, is the largest collection of
Michelangelo's figure studies fo
and pearls created by the Dalai
Vatican showpieces to tour North
the Sistine Chapel ceiling

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