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The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

January 09, 2004 - Image 38

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2004-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE GALLERY RESTAURANT

Jewish In America from page 37

Enjoy gracious dining amid a beautiful
atmosphere of casual elegance

41

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER

OPEN 7 DAYS:

MON. SAT. 7 a.m.- 9:30 p.m. SUN. 8 a.m.- 9 p.m.

-

West Bloomfield Plaza • 6638 Telegraph Road and Maple • 248-851-0313

793950

<hioese

r16,1att kosher 41J-Vottp<ao-tat

rt We'll Be There! Thursday, February 19,

etiffetzt

2004

Adat Shalom Synagogue • 6pm-Bpm

tt

Phone

Name

Address

Number of Children

Number of Adults

Check or Visa #

Non -Men' ers-t18 Aidnifs ► $8 Children Ade. Itler6ers-$15 Adults • $5 Children

Nursery School Children 5 under - Nt <hale

Clip Out and Mail Check or Visa # to Adat Shalom Synagogue

29901 Middleholt, Farmington Hills, MI 48334 • 248-625-5782

Jeffrey L. Rosenberg

Farmington Hills Kosher Catering

(Under supervision of Detroit Council of Orthodox Rabbis)

Telephone (248) 626-5702

Fax (248) 865•7845
Adat Shalom Synagogue

F

3

• BBQ Grill on the Table

• Best Sushi Bar in Town
• Traditional Floor
Sitting Rooms Available

■ Free Karaoke 9:00 p.m.
with dining or drinking

I your
10% food off
bill

TOTAL

I

I

ANY TIME

Dine in only • Not good with any other offer expires 1/31/04

e,w S eo u G ar den.

Authentic Korean & Japanese Cuisine

Phone (248) 827-1600

Open Daily

www.newseoulgarden.com
m
news- I

Catering Available E



A •

Home of the Finest
Italian and
Middle-East Cuisine

rin

10% OFF

S
I ANITA
kitchen

-I

(10-1000)
MIDDLE-EAST•ITALIAN•CH INESE

With Coupon • Expires 2/29/04

FREE

OPEN FOR BREAKFAST LUNCH & DINNER
CARRY-OUT & CATERING 10 TO 1000
MIDDLE-EAST•ITALIAN•CHINESE & MORE

LUNCH

,FARMINGTON HILLS 01
7.: 248 - 855 - 4150 EH

With Purchase Of
Greater Value Meal
(Up To $3.00)

With Coupon • Expires 2129/04

3 1005 ORCHARD LAKE RD.

To

$100 OFF

BREAKFAST

CATERING MENU

(Open 9-9 Sunday)

With Purchase Of GreaterValue Meal

I

With Coupon • Expires 2/29/04

FREE

DINNER

With Purchase Of
Greater Value Meal
(Up To $6.00)

With Coupon • Expires 2/29/04

South of 14 Mile • FAX# 248-855-3252

A
,,,------ThVoted

Best Coney Island
2 Years In A Row
aid e by Jewish News Readers

11 9
2004

38

CONEY
ISLAND

1

' SOUNCAV\
2002 WINNER

2003 WINNER:

of external affairs.
In 1972, the Los Angeles campus of
The center, designed by renowned
HUC opened and the collection moved
Montreal architect Moshe Safdie, is in
west, to a spot near the University of
the midst of a radical growth spurt that
Southern California in downtown Los
will take it in a more family-friendly
Angeles. The Skirball opened at its pres-
direction.
ent suburban site on April 21, 1996.
Located for the past 7 1 /, years in
The center is named after principal
architecturally distinctive quarters that
patrons Jack and Audrey Skirball (later
border the section of I-405 that links
Audrey Skirball-Kenis). He died in
west Los Angeles and the San Fernando
1985; she died last year.
Valley, the Skirball includes facilities for
With more than 30,000 holdings, the
performances and classes, a substantial
Skirball is second only to New York's
library and flexible exhibition space.
Jewish Museum in the number of
Now under construction at the
objects that represent Jewish history. In
Skirball is Winnick Hall, designed to
its permanent exhibition, "Visions and
expand the changing exhibition and
Values: Jewish Life From Antiquity to
children's galleries. It will open Sept. 14
America," the emphasis is on the jour-
with the Einstein exhibit.
ney to America, assimilation into
Also slated for completion this year is
American culture and the impact of the
the 350-seat Ziegler Amphitheater, an
Jewish immigrant population.
Along the way, bits of American histo- outdoor facility.
In 2006, the Skirball will unveil
ry are unearthed. A painting dating
"Noah's pArk," another 8,000 square
from 1854, artist uncredited, is a hand-
feet of indoor gallery space made up of
some period piece. But it also pictures
hands-on displays centered on the bibli-
an obscure but notable figure from
cal tale of Noah's ark. Inspired by a mas-
American history: Judah P. Benjamin.
sive folk art collection donated by L.A.
Benjamin served as a senator from
arts patron Lloyd Cotsen, the "pArk"
Louisiana before the Civil War — the
will be designed with children in mind.
first Jew ever elected to the Senate.
With these additions, the Skirball —
There, he met Mississippi's Jefferson
at approximately 600,000 square feet of
Davis, future president of the
built space on 15 acres — will become
Confederacy.
the largest Jewish cultural institution in
Benjamin served as the Confederacy's
the world.
secretary of war and then secretary of
Lieberman, daughter of Rochelle and
state; he fled to England at the close of
Dr. Arthur Lieberman of Bloomfield
the war. The Skirball also owns portraits
Hills and a bat mitzvah and confirrnand
of Benjamin's wife and daughter.
at Adat Shalom Synagogue in
Also in the collection are items that
Farmington Hills, said she "learned early
meld Jewish tradition with American
on the values that the Skirball imparts:
symbols.
the importance of tikkun olam, repairing
One example is Manfred Anson's
the world and being kind to the earth,
1985 menorah honoring the centennial
and of tzedakah, giving back to the
of the Statue of Liberty. Like other
community.
menorot, it can hold nine candles. But
"It's thrilling and rewarding to work at
unlike traditional versions, each candle
one
of the most dynamic and vibrant
becomes part of a torch held aloft by a
Jewish institutions in the world whose
miniature replica of the statue.
mission is to share those values," said
"Our collecting strategy has changed
the 1988 Bloomfield Hills Andover
through the years," comments Adele
Lander Burke, Skirball's vice president of High School graduate.
"As the Skirball grows, we'll continue
lifelong learning. "Earlier, it was a study
to welcome even more visitors — young
collection," explains Lander Burke. "But
and old, Jewish, Latino, Japanese,
it's increasingly taken on a public face,
African American, and more — to come
becoming something for the general
together to celebrate, reflect and learn,
public to learn about the Jewish experi-
and to discover the important role that
ence."
art and culture play in making connec-
"We are really something new, a
tions across communities, which is espe-
hybrid," explains Lori Starr, senior vice
cially important in times like these." ❑
president and the new director of the
StaffWriter Diana Lieberman
Skirball. "We include material culture
contributed
to this article.
(artifacts) and what it teaches about
shared human values. We don't show art
For more information on the
for art's sake. There are others layers to
Skirball Cultural Center, go to
peel in the presentation."
N
the Web site at www.skirball.ora
It's an exciting dine to work at th e
or call (310) 440-4500.
Skirball, says Detroit native Stacy
Lieberman, the cultural center's director
—„ •



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