100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

December 05, 2003 - Image 94

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Cover Story

MAINSTREAM

from page 73

111

The Jewish News is a tradition and a source of vital

information for Jews both in Detroit and abroad.

- David, West Bloomfield

I get it, you should too.

JN

subscribe and save! call 248.351.5174
or visit www.jewish.com

4xvaxgx.x,
Wednesday
Knitting Circle

A `tort for ImktrisiiNg Pe,t5

6-8 pm • $5

tk PePpLe, W o Love,Tftrn

Spectacular Yarns and
Canvasses for Creating Your
Holiday Gifts Now Available

• food • collars • leashes
• apparel • gifts • jewelry
• and oh so much more...

Rochelle Imber's

Knit Knit Knit

A

855-2114

Accents in
Needlepoint

rr

Proprietors: Alice Liberson, DVM
.& Isadora, DOG
206 N. Fourth Avenue, Ann Arbor
734-929-0022

626-3042

);

Orchard Mall
West
Bloomfield

,—.--

784610

414-
.

•E

SCO

RTED

T 0

U #

Ita

Spai

From $2,1

From $ 1,789

Central
Europe

10 Day:

9 Day: NLADRID,

From $1,999

ROME,

CORDOBA,

15 Day: WARSAW,

FLORENCE,

SEVILLE, TOLEDO.?

KRAKO\ WIWI'S

888-811-2812
www.arzaworld.com

PISA, VENICE ".

(opionalsanyiona)

VIENNA & PRAGUE

`if booked ",krolvf 11, 2CO3

Toeo f riee3

Flights ten New Yeik, tsctimentnlatitins, %listen, Sigh tseeing a

74

Starting December 8th
Mon.-Fri. 10ain-8pm
Thurs. 10am-8:45pm
Sat. 10am-5:45pm

PER 800K1NG

Ak±K WORLD

Muta, tx.el

!Awls, Disteant airfare is atm

OPEN SUNDAYS

12/ 5
2003

SAVE
$100-00

S

itwera, Wrxid

e fm most gatewa,A.

12 Noon - 5pm

rf

D IAMONDS & F INE JEWELRY

Michigan's most trusted jeweler since 1977

Abba Cohen, right, with former Sen. Jesse Helms, a Republican from North
Carolina, has established close relations with conservatives and Christians.

have a Washington office."
Despite resistance from some OU
leaders who felt the group should con-
centrate on kashrut and other religious
issues, Ganchrow hired Diament as the
group's political director in the mid-
1990s and, in 1998, the OU set up shop
in Washington.
In the small community of activists
who represent Jewish groups in
Washington, Diament, a Harvard Law
graduate and the son of a Long Island
rabbi, became a hard-to-ignore figure.
At first, he angered some of his fellow
Jewish representatives in Washington
with what was seen as cockiness and a
lack of respect for the traditions of coali-
tion politics. Others were put off— and
maybe a little envious — of Diament's
media skills. He is a prodigious producer
of newspaper op-eds; his Rolodex quick-
ly filled with media contacts.
But even some political adversaries
were won over.
"He's very serious and very smart,"
said a top activist for a rival Jewish
organization. "He understood very
quickly that relationships are a big part
of this job. My own group rarely agrees
with the OU, but I've developed a
healthy respect for Nathan."
In addition to big-ticket legislative
issues, such as vouchers and the little reg-
ulatory changes that can have a big
impact on Orthodox Jews, both Diament
and Cohen have been active participants
in the effort to recalibrate the church-state
balance through the courts.
Both joined conservative Christian
groups in challenging the state of
Washington, which denied a state-spon-
sored scholarship to a divinity student
on church-state grounds.
That case — Locke vs. Davey —

could be this year's Supreme Court
blockbuster. A broad ruling could sweep
away provisions in many state constitu-
tions barring government aid to
parochial institutions.
Again, the debate pits the OU and
Agudath against groups such as the
Anti-Defamation League. They have
waded into debates over some of the
highest-profile moral issues of the day,
from physician-assisted suicide to stem
cell research, bringing to bear a generally
conservative perspective, but with some
of the nuances that rabbinic thinkers
bring to any debate.

Complemental), Styles

Diament and Cohen don't always agree
with each other. For example, Agudath
supported the bill, recently signed by
Bush and sure to be challenged in the
courts, banning late-term abortions, a
top priority for religious conservatives.
The OU has declined comment on the
measure. Observers say that's because the
group is uncomfortable with blanket
prohibitions of a procedure that Jewish
law might consider appropriate under
some circumstances.
Cohen said that while he and
Diament don't agree on some issues,
they work well together.
"To the extent that he has a different
approach, we are very complementary,"
he said. "Nathan is more of a schmoozer
than I am. I think I work better more
quietly. But you never know which
approach is going to hit the right but-
tons."
Both groups bring another advantage
into the political realm. Because they
represent a relatively unified slice of the
diverse Jewish community, they are able
to take stronger, clear positions than

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan