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December 05, 2003 - Image 126

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-12-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

I I

Health

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After graduating from the University of
Michigan School of Education .and teaching
for five years, Harriet had a heightened
awareness of the value of education for a
lifetime of independence and self-reliance.
When a friend suggested joining Women's
American ORT, the connection between her
profession and her community responsibility
was made and never broken. Harriet stepped
forward to assume leadership roles including
Michigan Region President in the 1980s. She
describes her involvement this way: "We all

need a little magic in our lives — that special ingredient, person, place
or thing that gives us a sense of wonder and makes this world a special
place. ORT is that place for mySelf, my family and our ORT students."
Harriet became a Baroness de Gunzbourg member, providing for
the future of ORT students because she said, "Tzedakah is intertwined
in our lives, from the tradition begun by my father's family when they
raised money for their cousins club to help their families in Poland to
our family today. I am keenlyaware of the need to invest in the future of
our students, and know I can be part of their future by my investment." -
My father always said, 'we need to have something to look forward to in
life.' ORT -Oyes students that tangible hope, a future, a link to a better
life, a motivation, security, a solid platform upon which to build."

4 01N.



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The detroit Jewish News...

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including these ANN ARBOR locations

12/ 5

2003

106

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• Barry's Bagels Jackson Ave.
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UPS AND DOWNS from page 104

brations — weddings, bar mitvahs. I
once even got a talking scale but I start-
ed yelling at the scale. Now I'm on a
modified Atkins and that seems to be
working."
We can't prevent aging, but eating
right and staying fit can help keep us
feeling and looking good. According to
Ike Englebaum, publisher of the Senior
Gazette," there's no reason to abandon
what you look like as you get older.
"Appropriate portions, even if it means
splitting the entree with your spouse or
friend, is the way to go. "
One of the newer studies, published
in April in the New England Journal of
Medicine, reports that overweight peo-
ple are at higher risk of getting cancer.
The authors estimate that in the U.S.,
excess weight accounts for 14 percent of
cancer deaths in men and 20 percent of
cancer deaths in women.
All of us, regardless of weight, har-
bor a few cancer cells that can erupt
into full-blown disease. Our priority
is to keep our bodies healthy so that
doesn't happen.
"Changing dietary habits is difficult
and so is keeping with an exercise pro-
gram," says personal trainer Lynne
Appel Downing of Birmingham. "It
means retraining your mind and your
body. That isn't going to happen
overnight. It may require as much as
two years and lots of support from
family and friends."
Remember when fat was the dietary
villain and everything was labeled no
fat or reduced fat? Even so, in the
1990s the pounds kept adding on
because we weren't paying attention to
calories.
Fast forward a decade. Now it's car-
bohydrates being lynched. The Atkins
diet and other carb-free diets are
favorites. The problem is the more
dietary crazes change the more they
stay the same. Think about this: a
muffin from a Pillsbury muffin mix is
170 calories; an Atkins Quick Quisine
muffin is 160 calories. The difference
doesn't make a dent in your waist line
— only in your wallet.
One last finding. We already know
that losing even 5 or 10 pounds can
reduce our blood cholesterol signifi-
cantly. Now researchers at Tufts found
that weight loss also appears to help
keep the immune system running at
its best. That's important because an
improved immune function could
conceivably help fight everything from
the common cold to cancer.
Now if that isn't inspiration for los-
ing weight — what is? 1E1

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