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November 28, 2003 - Image 107

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-11-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THANK YO U

TO THE JEWISH NEWS READERS

WHO PARTICIPATED IN OUR

more insight into the artistry of cur-
rent interest in that country.
"While living on the Musqueam
Reservation in British Columbia, I
learned to carve from a native totem
pole carver," says Bass, who studied at
Hampshire College in Massachusetts.
"Now, I use the traditional materials,
tools and techniques of the Northwest
to create Judaica and furniture.
"Jews have used the materials,
tools and techniques of local cultures
to create unique, ceremonial and
decorative art. I create art to explore
and maintain both religious and cul-
tural identity."
Pam Thomford of Ohio likes to
make ritual objects for various reli-
gions. Although she is not Jewish, she
has a strong interest in Judaica.
Bringing in wood and found objects,
Thomford has created two menorot,
part of her "Homespun" series. She has
incorporated sewing items, such as
buttons and thread, to reference the
home life of Jews and the history of
many in the garment industry.
"I wanted to reference Jews in this
country," Thomford says. "I've
always been interested in the
pageantry of religions and the emo-
tional accessibility of ritual."
Susan Holt, who teaches at the
College for Creative Studies and has a
studio in Ann Arbor, brings a local
perspective to her design. Using sal-
vage materials from Detroit, she wants
to reintegrate pieces of city history
into her work.
"I used enamel on salvaged copper
tubing," explains Holt, a non-Jewish
artist represented in an earlier meno-
rah show. "My piece is quite contem-
porary and simple with flame-like col-
ors, shades of orange and yellow. I

embroidery competitions with
two different tallit designs. Her
winnings brought $45,000.
"I will be exhibiting a velvet tal-
lit in West Bloomfield," says
Sedar-Sherman, married to metal
and jewelry artist Ira Sherman. "I
make many for girls celebrating
their b'not mitzvah."

— Suzanne Chessler

"Soft Judaica" runs Dec. 4-Jan 29
in the second-level gallery at the
Janice Charach Epstein Gallery.
All items are available for pur-
chase. (248) 432-5448.

ANNUAL COAT DRIVE

AND HELPED US REACH OUR GOAL

OF COLLECTING 1,000 COATS

FOR THOSE IN NEED.

Annette Berenholz's menorah is con-
structed from copper and features the
metal's characteristic patina.

Because of your generosity, we have all
made this winter a little bit warmer.

Sincerely,
Howard 6- Steven Tapper
and your friends at Tapper's

Pamela Morris Thomford: This meno-
rah from the artist's "Home Spun" series
incorporates sewing items, such as but-
tons and thread, to reference the home
life of Jews and the history of many in
the garment industry.

erif

DIAMONDSWFINE JEWELRY

Michigan's most .trusted jeweler since 1977
Orchard Mall . West Bloomfield . 248-932-7700 . 800-337-GIFT

MAKE THE CONNECTION @ WWW.TAPPERS.COM

don't explore Jewish symbolism. I've
expressed a loose interpretation of
maintaining light."
Tedd McDonah, who teaches black-
smithing at the Toledo Museum of
Art, is making his first menorah.
Manipulating steel and a small spring,
he has come up with a very straight-
forward design.
"I wanted to convey the strength
of the material and relate that to the
menorah," explains McDonah, who
incorporated the spring to show that
the material also can be graceful.
"Going from the bottom up, there is
a pressed steel base, the spring and a
cross section with candles. I stuck
pretty much with what the menorah
is supposed to do, and kept black as
the color." rfi

The creators of Forbidden Broadway present a
holiday spoof even a Yiddishe Kupp would love!

Now Playing through January 4

Restaurant & New Year's Eve Packages
Available with the Century Grille

Call Now! (313) 963-9800

"Festival of Lights: Artists
Interpret Chanukah" runs Dec. 4-
Jan. 29 at the Janice Charach
Epstein Gallery in the Jewish
Community Center in West
Bloomfield. Artists' reception:
6:30-8:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 4.
Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Mondays-Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-7
p.m. Thursdays and 11 a.m.-4
p.m. Sundays. (248) 432-5448.

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333 MADISON • DOWNTOWN DETROIT

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in a quaint 1884 Victorian home.

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32905 Grand

River Ave., Farmington •

24 8 -8 8 8-808 8 „,3_,_„fe.a

"\k`
0 a,

11/28

2003

79

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