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September 26, 2003 - Image 73

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

NSIDE:

Commuithy
Calendar

88

Mazel
Toy!

91

og to ?I1d ? r
takes ri b e k

Dog Whisperer

Canine trainer Vladae Roytapel teaches you how dogs speak and think.

KERI GUTEN COHEN
Story Development Editor

IVIT

ho is the top dog in your family?
Chances are its Fido.
If you're like most Americans, your
dog is probably as indulged as your
children. And just like your children, your dog is
expert at stretching an inch into a mile.
But with dogs, you get behavior that can alienate
rather than integrate them into your family. It's hard

to live with a dog that jumps, barks, bites or destroys
things in your home.
In fact, poor behavior is the No. 1 reason people
relinquish their dogs, according to the Michigan
Humane Society.
So, who you gonna call when your dog's behavior is
out of control?
Vladae Roytapel. Some call him a "dog whisperer."
A university-trained animal behaviorist and dog train-
er, this 41-year-old Jewish native of the former Soviet
republic of Azerbaijan speaks six languages: English,

Russian, Turkish, Romanian, Ukrainian — and
"canine."
"Ahhhhhhhhhht," he says sharply to a noisy dog as
he enters a home, mimicking the low growl of a
mother dog disciplining her pups. As the startled dog
quiets, Roytapel switches to a happy falsetto, saying
"Good boy" in the tone the mother dog uses to show
approval. His Russian accent doesn't faze the dog,
which is now attentive.
"Surprise creates attention; attention creates
WHISPERER on page 74

tv

9/26
2003

73

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