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September 26, 2003 - Image 147

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

American Jews adjust and adapt to unknown fears and challenges.

MICHAEL J. JORDAN
Jewish Telegraphic Agency

New York

T

he Sept. 11 terrorist
attacks, the Palestinian
intifada and a resurgence of
anti-Semitism in Europe all
have combined to show American
Jews that the world may not be as safe
and secure as seemed possible at the
close of the last century.
Three years later, however, it seems
that the shock to the Jewish system
has given way to acceptance of a new
reality of uncertainty and insecurity.

Israel has been battered by terrorist
attacks, yet tourists began to return to
the Jewish state even before Palestinian
terrorist groups announced a cease-fire
in early summer. The war in Iraq
came and went, but there was little
public discussion in the community of
the security of American Jews.
In the year 5763, it seems, Jews grew
accustomed to the unforeseeable. "It's
certainly impossible to live in a con-
stant state of alarm, so there is a little
less adrenaline in the Jewish system —
but not a lot less," said David Wolpe,
rabbi of Sinai Temple in Los Angeles.
"One comment by a French govern-

ment official" about the Jews, he said,
"and the thermostat rises again."
Meanwhile, Jewish leaders who
warned of a new and dangerous world
feel vindicated, observers said. This
holds particularly true for
those who long had
warned of Islamic funda-
mentalism.
"There's growing under-
standing of the issues and
nature of the threat among
Americans, American Jews,
our government and other _g
governments that for a
long time were ignored,

said Malcolm Hoenlein, executive vice
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American Jewish
Organizations. "The war on terrorism
will define the 21st century and help
determine the quality
of life that we our
children and grandchil-
dren will enjoy," he
said. "The spread of
Islamic extremism is a

STRENGTH AMID
STRIFE on page 148

Yasser Arafat

"

OF TEE ROAD MAP

MIDDLE EAST EVENTS

June 29

July 8

Aug. 12

Aug. 19

Under heavy
military pres-
sure from Israel
in response to a
series of terror-
ist attacks,
Hamas and
Islamic Jihad
unilaterally
declare a three-
month "cease-
fire" in attacks
on Israelis.

Abbas resigns
as deputy head
of the Fatah
Central
Committee,
the movement's
top executive
body,
reflecting a
split within
group over
negotiations
with Israel.

A pair of sui-
cide bombings
by Hamas and
the Fatah
movement's Al-
Aksa brigade
kill two Israelis.
The bombings
do not stop
Israel from
releasing
hundreds of
prisoners.

Hamas and
Islamic Jihad
launch a sui-
cide attack on
a Jerusalem
bus, killing 22.
Israel says the
Palestinian
Authority must
take substantial
steps to crack
down on
terrorists.

Aug. 21
Palestinian ter
rorist groups
call off their
self-imposed
"ease-fire"'
after Israel kills
Hamas leader
Ismail Abu
Shanab in a
strike in Gaza.
The groups
vow revenge on
Israel.

Sept. 4

Sept. 6

Abbas asks
Abbas resigns
Parliament to
as P.A. prime
support him or minister after
strip him of his losing a power
post, saying
struggle with
infighting is
;-Arafat. Israel
keeping him
narrowly misses
from making
killing llamas
progress on the spiritual leader
U.S.-backed
Sheik Ahmed
peace plan.
assin.

Sept. 7

Sept. 9

Ahmed Karia is
named as the
new P.A. prime
minister.

A pair of
suicide attacks
in Israel kill
16, raising
further doubts
about the
viability of
implementing
the road
map plan.

4N\

9/26

2003

147

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