100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

September 26, 2003 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

This Week

For Openers

Mixed Messages

"Everything's got a moral if only you can
find it."
— Lewis Carroll

here are any number of old,
"wise" sayings. Often, however,
the advice given in one seems
to contradict the advice given
SY
in another.
MANELLO
For sentimentalists, "Absence makes
Editorial
the heart grow fonder." This, of course, is
Assistant
not always successful as a method of
establishing closeness if you consider that
"Out of sight, out of mind" is often true.
If you think you ought to speak out about something,
you may be reminded, "A closed mouth
catches no flies." Yet, you may rejoin
with, "A squeaky wheel
gets the grease."
Laughter is thought to
be a boon to life as wit-
nessed in "A day is lost if
one has not laughed" or
"If you don't laugh, you'll
cry." Also consider,
"Laugh before breakfast
and you'll cry before din-
ner" and "Laugh and the
world laughs with you; cry
and you cry alone.
Trying to teach someone
the value of waiting, con-
sider "Patience is a virtue."
If that it true, how do we
validate "If not now,
when"?
If "A miss is as good as a
mile," then why offer
"Nothing ventured, noth-
ing gained"? Keep in mind

"

that "He who hesitates is lost;" but if you "Act in haste,
you repent at leisure." And though "Better late than
never" is good, we know that "First come, first served"
is an oft-quoted rule.
Though "Every man has his price," always keep in
mind "Buyer beware!" Speaking of price, you may be
offered "A penny for your thoughts;" but "Even a fish
would not get into trouble if it kept its mouth shut."
And though "Charity begins at home" and "It is better
to give than to receive"; "He who goes a-borrowing,
goes a-sorrowing" so "Neither a borrower nor a lender
be."
Yes, "Actions speak louder than words," but "A word
to the wise is sufficient" because "Great ideas are the
fuel of progress."
For those who are concerned with looks, there are the
reminders: "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder;"
"Beauty is only skin deep;" "Handsome is as
handsome does." Yet,
"Anything with scales counts
as a fish" even though
"Appearances are deceptive."
If you are concerned about
others, "Before healing oth-
ers, heal yourself;" and in
doing so, "An apple a day,
keeps the doctor away."
If you are tempted to "Do
what comes naturally," you
should "Do unto others as
you would have them do
unto you" all the while
recalling, "Forewarned is
forearmed."
All of you out there who
think, "Birds of a feather
flock together," should
remember that it's
"Different strokes for dif-
ferent folks." ❑

wo months in the Jewish
calendar are described with
opposite descriptions. In
one, joy increases as the
month progresses; in the other, joy
decreases. Can you name the months
and the reasons?

— Goldfein

•1(01 QSED.TOQp 01 pigs S T. csurj (Avcci
aisn) Av Jo asEj alp tplAm Suynp 'AV
Jo tpuoul a1-LL -ssauTnyCor asuaapui of
pus ST cspj arland gaignn Supnp qupv
Jo tpuolu auauSuuds ata :iamstry

-

notables

"The National Jewish Population
Survey reveals the many important
and diverse ways that Jews are con-
nected to their faith and their com-
munity. Still, the study underscores
that for too many, those ties are tenu-
ous. We have a great deal of work to
do to make being Jewish more mean-
ingful and relevant for those on the
edges."
— Stephen Hoffman, president and

CEO of United Jewish Communities,
the umbrella for the North American
federated network.

'Yiddish Limericks

Your bargain-store days will be gone.
"He's kayach reich,** your boyfriend
Shawn.
That shmaltz goob** you fell in,"
I told my friend Helen,
"Will mean life's g'shmeert*** from


now on.

— Martha Jo Fleischmann

Shabbat Candlelighting

"I pray that one day I will light Shabbat candles as a married woman with a
family, and that my candlelighting be as meaningful as was our mothers'
Sarah, Rebecca, Rachel and Leah."

— Shulan2it Ahuvah Dashevsky, Oak Park

9/26
2003

10

Sponsored by Lubavitch
Women's Organization.
To submit a candlelighting
message or to receive
COMpliiiiCntaiy candlesticks
and it rmation on Shabbat
candlelighting, call Ii/liriam
Amzalak of Oak Park at
(248) 548-6771 or e-mail:
mamzalak@juno.com

Candlelighting

[

Candlelighting

Friday, Sept. 26, 7:05 p.m.

Friday, Oct. 3, 6:53 p.m.

Shabbat Ends

Shabbat Ends

Saturday, Sept. 27, 8:04 p.m.

Saturday, Oct. 4, 7:52 p.m.

* (literal) strongly rich
(idiomatic) very wealthy
** (literal) fat pit
(idiomatic) tub of money
***(literal) smeared
(idiomatic) greased, as with money

Yiddish-isms

behayma
Literally: animal, especially used for a
cow; also, a stupid man or woman, an
ignoramus, a dumbbell.

Source: From The New Joys of Yiddish
by Leo Calvin Rosten, edited by
Lawrence Bush, copyright 2001, by
the Rosten Family LLC. Used by per-
mission of the Rosten Family LLC.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan