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September 12, 2003 - Image 102

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-09-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

AppleTree

HAPPY LITTLE BOOK from page 101

Its Sukkah Time! by Latifa Berry Kropf,
with photographs by Tod Cohen.
Copyright 2003, published by Kar-Ben,
1-800-4KARBEN. 24 pages. $10.95.

Tiny children love to look at other tiny
children, and here's a fun book that
allows them to do just that.
It's Sukkah Time! is a cute little book
showing preschool children preparing
for the holiday. They help pick apples
and pumpkins and even build the
sukkah. They lift the frame, connect the
boards, and make decorations with
beads.
Once they've made a real sukkah, the
children decide to create a tiny sukkah
for their classroom, and then even
smaller ones (from the plastic green
containers that usimlly serve as a home
to cherry tomatoes) for their toy people.
Then they sing and dance in their real
sukkah, have some snacks and shake the
lulay.
As the book ends, two little girls are
standing under an umbrella:
Sometimes it rains on Sukkot, but we
don't mind. Rain means there will be a
good harvest next year.
The photos here are delightful (the
best show the children laughing), and
the text is simple and sweet. At the
back, readers will find information on
how to make their own small sukkah
(the green-vegetable-basket variety) and

the blessings to be said in the sukkah.
Another nice touch: Its Sukkah Time
actually mentions God, a feature sorely
lacking in so many Jewish children's
books today.

Night Lights: A Sukkot Story by Barbara
Diamond Goldin. Copyright 2002,
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations Press
wwvv.uahcpress.com 32 pages. $12.95.

The text of this book was first pub-
lished in 1995; the latest version fea-
tures new illustrations. It's unclear why
this book needed to be reprinted
already, since there's nothing extraordi-
nary about it.
Night Lights is the tale of a family
building their sukkah: Dad is in his
jeans and Mom wears Birkenstock-like
sandals with socks, the kids are all sit-
ting around making decorations, food
will come from their garden.
Interestingly, and much to the reader's
confusion, this family apparently knows
enough about Sukkot that they are
committed to sleeping in it, but not a
great deal about the rules for building a
sukkah. ("When we're in the sukkah,
we're supposed to see the sky through
the roof," the father says. This is
absolutely untrue.)
The little boy, Daniel, is afraid to

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sleep in the sukkah because he fears
bears and wolves, but he does, nonethe-
less. His big sister, Naomi, makes fun of
him — then she's afraid, too, so the two
cuddle together under the sky (Where
are the parents? you may be wondering.
Inside in their beds, we can only guess)
and think of their ancestors, falling
asleep with the "night lights," the stars,
that keep them feeling safe.
The ending is nice enough, but not
really worth the price of the book.

Also new

in print:

Tasty Bible Storks: A Menu of Tales
and Matching Recipes by Tami Lehman
Wilzig, with illustrations by Katherine
Janus Kahn. Copyright 2003, published
by Kar Ben. 64 pages, $10.95.

This is not specifically a Rosh
Hashanah book, but its brand new and
great for the holidays.
What could be more fun than fami-
lies cooking together, especially with a
book that actually offers new food ideas
and puts them in a Jewish context.
Tasty Bible Stories is a collection of
ancient Torah tales (Adam and Eve,

Noah, Sarah, Jacob, Joseph, Moses,
Passover, the Exodus, Ruth, King
David, among others) told in a very
modern tone:
God told Noah to leave the ark and to
bring his family and all the animals with
him so they could be fruitful and multiply.
Excitedly, he cried out to his family,
"Let's go!"
Now able to farm again, Noah was
interested in growing new fruits.
"I have a grape idea!" he called out
happily one day.
"You mean GREAT idea," corrected
Shem.
"No I mean GRAPE," insisted Noah.
?in going to grow grapes!"
With each retelling (all are short,
about two pages), the reader also gets
really cool recipes. With the Noah story,
for example, you'll find a "grape" fruit
salad and three bean olive salad; accom-
panying the Adam and Eve tale are
recipes for apple pie and fresh figs with
sour cream; the recounting of Jacob and
Esau has a yummy-looking recipe for
spicy lentil dip.
Rosh Hashanah is a time of newness.
You can have fun and experience some-
thing new (a recipe or a fun retelling of
a familiar tale) with Tasty Bible Stories.0

P H S AL N Z P TYWR V Y

N

R O H C I L HS A T E A N O Z

Are you good at word searches, mazes,
secret codes? Then AppleTree's "Are
You PiiMed?" is perfect for you!
If you solve this week's challenge
(open to adults and children of all
ages), send your solution, along with
your name and city of residence, to
arrive NO LATER THAN Tuesday,

Sept. 23 to: I Found It! do AppleTree,
the Jewish News, 29200 Northwestern
Hwy., Suite 110, Southfield, MI
48034.
We'll print the names of everyone
who solves the puzzle here in
AppleTree.

O

MNYKHLUQFEEMXU

H

EMS E WOQV Y F K WAO

S

G Q I TT TLWVI T F SA

M R F ERE K E I PI RENJ

A AY WE ANLPDRT OML

R N L X MJ V U C HAL L A H

T AWS E Z R B A J F YHCX

H

Happy High Holidays

Can you find the following words in this High Holiday word search?
(Words can be forward and backward, vertical, horizontal and diagonal).
Shevarim
Sweet
Teki a
Apple
Tashlich
Terua
Challah
Holiday
Yom Kippur
Fish
Honey
Pomegranate
New Year
Rams Horn
Shofar

9/12

2003

102

T J H M J X P H Y E N O H A

X E B OMHPFI SHNEUT

MR

Z

X

E

D

P

B

T

F

OHI

K

P

R

Z GP F Q L Y

Q

A

AI

C P A E Y Y

S

F

V

L

X N G R Y X Q

X

A

P

H H G L T U

J

I

R

K

N

APPLE
HOLIDAY
POMEGRANATE
SHOFAR
TEKIA

CHALLAH
HONEY
RAMSHORN
SWEET
TERUA

T

W

FISH
NEWYEAR
SHEVARIM
TASHLICH
YOMICIPPUR

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