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August 29, 2003 - Image 65

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-08-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Cafe

THAI CUISINE

Wednesday, Oct. 8, in a lecture about
one of the greatest Russian lyric poets
of all time, at the Frieze Building.
Gabriella Safran, assistant professor
in the Department of Slavic Languages
and Literatures at Stanford University,
will explore another writer. Also
appearing at the Frieze Building, her
lecture topic explains "How Shloyme-
Zany! Rappoport Invented S. An-sky:
The Jew as a Petersburg Writer," 4-6
p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 4.
Safran, who is preparing a book on
this subject, will discuss the Jewish
folklorist's creation of The Dybbuk,
which she terms the most fundamental
piece of Yiddish theater. As an exten-
sion of that, she will cover the Russian
roots of Israel's Habima Theater.
"I'm interested in reclaiming
Rappoport as a Russian writer and
telling about his pseudonym," says
Safran, who also has done considerable
research in Russia.
"Knowing about the people of St.
Petersburg makes us contemplate what
humans can dream and realize the
possibilities for Jews in the Russian
empire."
Rappoport was committed to estab-
lishing a Jewish museum in St.
Petersburg, where political movements
led to its closing and new interest is
again emerging. The development of a
museum is tied to projects like the
postcard exhibit.
"We hope Jews in other cities will be
interested in this artwork," Ivanov
says. "We'd be happy to take it to
other places.

The Jewish World in Postcards, a free
exhibit with free lectures, runs Sept.
2-26 at the Media Union Gallery,
2281 Bonisteel Blvd., in Ann Arbor.
The opening reception will be
held 4-6 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 4,
with Valery Dymshits, director of
the Jewish Heritage Center in St.
Petersburg, lecturing on "The
Jewish World in Postcards"; he will
speak on "The Postcard as a Mirror
of Russian Jewish Mentalite in the
Early 20th Century" 4-6 p.m.
Monday, Sept. 8, also at the gallery.
Gallery hours are noon-6 p.m.
Mondays-Fridays and 1-5 p.m.
Sundays.
"The Jews of St. Petersburg
Lectures," with professors from the
University of Pennsylvania, Columbia
University and Stanford University,
take place 4-6 p.m. Sept. 24, Oct. 8
and Nov. 4, at 3050 Frieze Building,
105 S. State Street. (734) 615-1287 or
www.urnich.edui-judstudievents.htm.

C

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St. Petersburg Festival features contributions
of Russian cultural icons.

library exhibit connected to
D.C., will explain "Nicholas I and
the yearlong University of
The Hermitage: Builder, Patron,
Michigan celebration of St.
Tastemaker" 3 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 26.
Petersburg in Russia has some Jewish
A series of six afternoon talks by
content.
curators from the State Hermitage
"St. Petersburg: Window on the
Museum will take place at the
EastWindow on the West," which
International Institute at 1080 South
focuses on the University Library's
University noon Wednesday, Sept. 10;
own St. Petersburg treasures, will
4 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 16; 4 p.m.
highlight the works of Jewish
Wednesday, Sept. 17; 4 p.m.
cultural icons who include
Tuesday, Oct. 7; 4 p.m.
Boris Pasternak, Benedikt
Monday, Oct. 20; and 4
Livshits, Joseph Brodsky, Lev
p.m. Tuesday, Oct, 28.
Bakst and Vladimir (El)
Special activities for the
Lissitzky.
family are planned 2-5 p.m.
The exhibit, which runs
Sunday, Oct. 18.
through Nov. 22 in the
Other highlights of the
Special Collections Library at
"Celebrating St. Petersburg"
920 N. University Ave., fea-
festival, sponsored by
Pastern ak
tures journals, first editions,
University Musical Society,
correspondence and hand- .
include the St. Petersburg
painted designs by many Russian
Quartet on Friday, Oct. 3, at
intellectuals beyond the Jewish com-
Rackham Auditorium; Boris Gudonou,
munity.
staged with a cast of actors from
Kelly Miller, visiting assistant pro-
Russia's leading theaters, Wednesday-
fessor of the Department of Russian
Sunday, Oct. 29--Nov 2 at the U-M
Language and Literature at Dickinson Sports Coliseum; and The Dia?), of a
College in Pennsylvania, will discuss
Scoundrel by Alexander Ostrovsky,
exhibit items 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept.
performed in English, Thursday-
25.
Sunday, Nov. 20-23, at Lydia
The library program precedes "The
MendeIssohn Theatre.
Romanovs Collect: European Art
--- Suzanne Chessler
from the Hermitage," a University of
Michigan Museum of Art exhibition
"St. Petersburg: Window on the
of more than 140 works of fine and
East/Window
on the West" runs
decorative art from the State
through Nov. 22 in the Special
Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg.
Collections Library at 920 N.
Ann Arbor will be the exclusive
University Ave. Gallery hours
worldwide venue for this collection,
are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. weekdays
which runs Sept. 21-Nov. 23 and
and 10 a.m.-noon Saturdays
showcases pieces obtained by the line
when
there are no home foot-
of Roinanov czars.
ball games. (734) 936-2348.
There will be French paintings,
"The Romanovs Collect:
Dutch drawings, Italian sculpture,
European Art from the Hermitage"
detailed furniture, Wedgwood and
will be shown Sept. 21-Nov. 23 at
Sevres porcelain and Aubusson tapes-
the University of Michigan
tries.
Museum
of Art. Gallery hours are
Lectures, films and educational pro-
10
a.m.-5
p.m. Tuesdays-
grams are being scheduled to supple-
Wednesdays
and Fridays-Saturdays,
ment the works on view.
10
a.m.-9
p.m.
Thursdays and
Alexey Leporc, assistant professor of
noon-5 p.m. Sundays. $8.
art history at the European University
For a complete schedule of spe-
at St. Petersburg, will discuss
cial activities related to
"Becoming Russian: The Evolution of
"Celebrating St. Petersburg: 300
Russian Style in the Imperial Court"
Years
of Cultural Brilliance," go
3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 28.
to
vvww.umich.edu/stpetersburg.
Ann Odom, curator emeritus of the
Hillwood Museum in Washington,

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