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August 29, 2003 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-08-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

This Week

Something Extra

Learn About Mission

MacDowell Alumni Unite!

mong the celebrated alumni of Detroit's
MacDowell Elementary School are chil-
dren's book author and illustrator David
Small and Detroit Public Schools CEO Dr.
Kenneth Burnley.
The school, at 4201 W. Outer Drive in north-
west Detroit, is also the alma mater of thousands
of members of the Jewish community. And since a
successful reunion last October, these alumni have
banded together to provide tutoring and other
assistance to current MacDowell students.
"You do not need to have all H's [Honors] on
your MacDowell report card or yellow sheets,"
said organizer Sherry Erman Stewart of
Bloomfield Township. "You just need a desire to
make a difference in a young person's education."
This year, the alumni will be part of the Detroit
Jewish Coalition for Literacy, which trains and
coordinates about 400 volunteers at 35 public
schools in and around Detroit.
For more information on the MacDowell alum-
—Robert A. Sklar
ni group, contact Stewart at (248) 642-5257 or
by e mail at Hste157045@aol.com
For more information about the Detroit Jewish
Coalition for Literacy, contact Phyllis Jarvis at the
Jewish Community Council of Metropolitan
he attempt to negotiate a lasting peace has
Detroit, (248) 642-5393.
failed, so Israel has no choice but to unleash
— Diana Lieberman
its military might inside the Palestinian-con-
trolled territories and root out terrorism at its core,
the Editorial Page editor of the Detroit News said in
his Sunday column.
Any hope for a political solution to the violence in
the Middle East vanished in the bus bombing
Tuesday, which killed 20 and maimed scores of oth-
ers, many of them children," Nolan Finley wrote in
hose wrist bracelets many Temple Israel
his column on Aug. 24.
members are wearing these days pay tribute
"Terrorist groups Hamas and Islamic Jihad compet-
to Israeli victims of Palestinian terror. Each
ed for credit," he continued. "There's only one way to bracelet contains the name and age of a victim and
deal with those who find glory in slaughtering chil-
the date of their murder. An accompanying sheet
dren: Kill them. The bomber's wife said her husband
tells about the person.
died fulfilling his dream of martyr-
The metal bracelets will be
dom. The man had two kids of his
worn at least-through the High
own, and yet his life's dream was to
Holidays in a show of respect and
die killing other people's children.
solidarity.
"You can't negotiate with that level
"In many ways, the problem we
of ignorance, hatred and religious
are
using these bracelets to deal
insanity."
with has no solution," said Rabbi
Finley is a consistent supporter of
Joshua Bennett of Temple Israel in
Israel's right to safe, secure borders
West Bloomfield.
and a popular speaker in the Jewish
Bennett
Finley
"For those who have lost loved
community. Last winter, he joined a
ones to acts of terror, and who
Jewish Community Council of
will
never see those loved ones
Metropolitan Detroit trip to the Middle East.
again," he said, "the bracelets help keep memories
In his column, he lauded the Jewish state for offer-
alive."
ing "extraordinary concessions in the name of peace"
Congregants paid $10 per bracelet. Proceeds
for
taking
"good
faith
steps,
including
disman-
and.
will go to Israeli families victimized by terrorism
ding settlements and pulling back troops."
over the past 35 months.
He rejected President Bush's road map because it
"Jews who live in freedom in Israel, the United
"started the Palestinians toward statehood without
States
and elsewhere around the globe," Rabbi
forcing them to unstrap their bombs."
Bennett
said, "have an obligation and an opportu-
To end the violence, he said, "Israel must strike
nity to make a difference for those families who
with terrible force. To be blunt, the Palestinians must
have been affected by terror in our beloved land
be brought to their knees, made to feel the pain of
of Israel."
allowing terrorists to act in their name."

ro

rospective participants on Federation's
Michigan Miracle Mission 4 will have a chance
to hear more about the sojourn at an informa-
tional meeting to be held at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept.
8, at the Max M. Fisher Federation Building, 6735
Telegraph, south of Maple, in Bloomfield Township.
The Detroit Jewish News and the Michigan Board
of Rabbis are cosponsors of the Jewish Federation of
Metropolitan Detroit-hosted mission, scheduled for
April 18-28, 2004 (see related editorial: page 25).
Mission co-chairs Peter Alter and Richard Krugel
will lead the Sept. 8 discussion. Special itineraries and
opportunities are being planned for first-time and
return visitors. Free time and time to learn or grow
will be woven into the schedule. Mission goers will
tour in small groups, but will unite at mega events.
A $100 discount on the $2,895 cost per person is
available through Sept. 8. For an application, call
Sally Krugel, mission director, at Federation, (248)
203 1485, or visit www.thisisfederation.org

A

-

-

The Way To Peace

T

Linked In Tribute

T

—Robert A. Sklar

8/29
2003

14

—Robert A. Sklar

Kosher Seuss Chef

he National Education Association is cele-
brating "Read Across America" by encour-
aging adults to read to children.
Of course, Green Eggs and Ham is one of the
most popular books by children's author Dr.
Seuss. But, here's the dilemma. How can Jewish
kids celebrate with green eggs and HAM?
So, in honor of (and with apologies to the
estate of Dr. Seuss), here's a new ending for the
story that's been circulating on the Internet:

T

Will you never see?
They are not KOSHER, So let me be!
I will not eat green eggs and ham.
I will not eat them, Sam-I-am
But I'll eat green eggs with a biscuit!
Or I will try them with some brisket.
I'll eat green eggs in a box.
If you serve them with some lox.
And those green eggs are worth a try
Scrambled up in matzah brei!
And in a boat upon the river,
I'll eat green eggs with chopped liver!
So if you're a Jewish Dr. Seuss fan,
But troubled by green eggs and ham,
Let your friends in on the scoop:
Green eggs taste best with chicken soup!
— Keri Guten Cohen

Long Distance Writing,

spiring journalists looking to study at an
Israeli school now have the opportunity to
enroll in a six-session online correspondence
writing course — without ever leaving Michigan.
The Jewish Writing Institute (JWI), an Israeli non-
profit organization headquartered in the North Galilee
city of Safed, offers English-language online courses in
fiction, memoir and grant writing, interviewing, poetry
and publishing — all taught by experienced teachers
using their own original material. An editing and cri-
tique service is also offered, with all courses geared
toward those looking to write for Jewish audiences.
Students work one-on-one with instructors who
provide individuallized feedback via e-mail.
JWI is directed by Esther Susan Heller, an editor,
writer and writing instructor who received her bachelor's
degree from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
For information on the Jewish Writing Institute,
e-mail Esther Susan Heller at: jwriting@kinneret.co.il
or access the Jewish Writing Institute Web site at:
wvvw.jewishwriting.com

A

Correction

In "It's Good To Be King" (Aug. 22, page 62),
the religious backgrounds of the parents of actor
Victor Talmadge were reversed. His late father, a
therapist, was brought up in a New York
Orthodox family; his mother, also a therapist,
was born in Poland, where her father was a
Jewish socialist leader. Talmadge is the lead actor
in the Stratford Festival of Canada's production
of The King and I.

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