100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 22, 2003 - Image 36

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-08-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Community

ELEPHANTS

from page 35

swimming together since they met."

Unbelievable Adventures

Stories about the animals and their envi-
ronment are enthusiastically shared by
the 200 volunteer docents who are, like
Slovis, frontline educators.
In 1977, as the philosophy of zoos
changed and the zoo recognized the
need for education, the docent program
was formed, says Sue Kingsepp, manager
of volunteers at the zoo. Docents show
people around the zoo for free and also
are stationed as gallery guides and zoo

Federation of Metropolitan Detroit,
nursing homes and the Detroit Public
Schools.
"The kids today are very smart," says
Stein, who practices by giving her grand-
children tours of the zoo. "I swear, that's
why my grandchildren are so smart," she
chuckles.

Future Excitements

To continue to challenge and interest
especially its young visitors, the zoo has
several recent additions in operation. As
a leader in technology, the zoo created

Don't miss your last chance to save
at our lowest ever

(Almost 40% savings off the newsstand price!)

The Jewish News makes a great gift
for friends and family!

ACT NOW!

.

to get this terrific rate and insure that you receive your annual
copy of the JN SourceBook and the special Rosh Hashana issue.

But hurry, this offer expires September 1, 2003*

Just fill out and mail the form below, or call

248.351.5174

or visit our website at www.detroitjewishnews.com

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
I:i Please bill me ❑ Payment enclosed Charge my: ❑ Visa ❑ MC ❑ AMEX
exp. date:
Card #

GIFT RECIPIENT INFORMATION

Phone (

Mail to: Detroit Jewish News
P.O. Box 2267 • Southfield, MI
48037-2267

*In-state new subscribers only
Allow 2-3 weeks to begin delivery. www.detroitjewishnews.com

The zoo rescued Barla, who now lives in the largest polar bear facility in the country.

the program for the wild adventure sim-
ambassadors who are age 18 and older.
ulator.
The zoo has a total of 800 volunteers,
A motion-based cabin holds 30 people
including 350 gardeners, she says.
at
a time. With the aide of a wide screen
The docents, however, not only teach,
and
digital surround sound, you move
but continually learn.
and
see
and hear like an animal, says Dr.
A dentist by day, Larry Freedman of
Bingham. Farms has been educating chil- Kagan. "We transform you into dol-
phins, owls and cougars."
dren about animals and their plight
This project is part of how the zoo is
since 1992. "Humans cause many animal
leading the way in interpreting the rela-
species to become endangered," he says.
tionship between humans and animals,
"By educating visitors to these problems,
he says, which is also explored in the 10
we hope to create responsible world citi-
films sponsored by the zoo and shown
zens."
in the zoo's Wild Life Interpretive
Working at the zoo also afforded him
Gallery.
an opportunity of a lifetime. A couple
The most-recent film, produced by
years ago, Freedman went to Namibia to
Oscar winner Sue Marx of Birmingham,
help rescue 25 cheetahs — his favorite
will feature James Earl Jones narrating
animal — that were eventually healed
From Show Boats to Life Boats, about the
and released back into the wild. 'An
zoo's
evolution from using animals as
unbelievable adventure," he says of the
entertainment, once popular and now
program he learned about through the
considered cruel to animals.
zoo.
With so much available at the zoo, the
Marion Stein of West Bloomfield vol-
docents can help guide visitors to make
unteered at many institutions over the
their choices. As docent Slovis sees her
years, including Congregation Shaarey
job,
"I want to get kids excited about
Zedek, and as a volunteer probation
their
natural environment, get them ask=
officer at Southfield district court. But
ing questions and share in the magic of
once she came to the zoo, she remained
the zoo."
for 19 years.
For information on the zoo and
"It's a constant learning process," she
anniversary events call: (248) 398-0900
says about working at the zoo.
Stein leads school tours, as well as out- or visit the Web site:
wvvvv.detroitzoo.org El
reach programs at places like the Jewish

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan