100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

August 15, 2003 - Image 55

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-08-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Mario's Restaurant

Rinoilhaelk Is Here
August 1st illtru August 31st

Conte celebrate 56 years in Detroit
Prices are front the 192'Irs-
Lo !/1
$11 . 9



• bster

Monday & Wednesday
ew York Sirloin
Veal Picante
Shrimp Bordelaise
Fettuccine Alfredo
Sliced Beef Pepperonata
Chicken Cacciatore
Tuesday & Thursday
Filet, Mignon
Veal Marsala
Sliced Beef Siciliana
Chicken Picante
Manicotti or Cannelloni
Broiled Whitefish
Friday & Sunday
Chateaubriand (for 2)
Sliced Beef Stefanelli
Broiled Whitefish
Chicken Moretti
Crab Legs (in the shell)

18

I

5

er 1 "43 '
red skin
)0cl/tides:
cC cornafr'es

n16.95

16.95
213.95
16.95

18.95
216.95
216.95

n 14.95

13.95

$14.95

$
,,52.95
2 16.95
14.95
? 14.95
„ 24.95

it t

All Dinners include: Salad Bowl, Minestrone or Onion Soup, Pasta, Bread Baskc

dot#et...

„P P

Historians and family members gathered at Fort Michilimackinac in
Mackinaw City to celebrate Michigan's first Jew.

on's Football
Sunday Brunch <I
'`
& Tailgate
& Shuttle

• ,t . t,

s :2■

„,3111t0.
. 4,\

Jewish Historical Society of Michigan,
the state marked the 200th anniver-
sary of the uprising with a plaque at
the entrance to the fort, commemorat-
ing Solomons as "Michigan's First
Jewish Settler."
As part of Michigan's second oldest
state park, Fort Michilimackinac has
undergone intensive archaeological
research and thorough restoration, and
Solomons' trading house has been
faithfully rebuilt.
Inside, a wax figure of Solomons
stands by his desk in front of a fire-
place, surrounded by goods, including
bales of beaver pelts.
For the last 40 years, costumed his-
torical interpreters have re-enacted the
Pontiac uprising each summer for
tourists. The Solomons reunion was
timed to coincide with the staged bat-
tle.
Many Solomons descendants also
posed for photographs with a histori-
cal interpreter in dress uniform and
three-pointed hat, who has portrayed
their ancestor for the last 21 years.
In the 1770s, Solomons built up a
string of successful trading posts north
of Lake Superior, prompting rivals in
the Hudson's Bay Company to refer to
him in correspondence as "that illiter-
ate Jew.
But according to Godfrey, he was far
from illiterate.
"As a prominent member of the
Montreal Hebrew Congregation, he
was recorded in its minutes as leading
its services and reading in Hebrew," he
said.
Like his fellow fur traders, Solomons
often traveled by canoe from the Sault
Ste. Marie area to attend High

31

Holidays services in Montreal.
When his young son Joseph died in
1778, he sought to bury him in the
Jewish cemetery in Montreal. The
congregation consented but inserted a
rule into its constitution immediately
afterward stating that uncircumsized
males could never be buried there.
In the 1780s Solomons returned
with his family to Michilimackinac
and lived on Mackinac Island with
other fur traders. Archaeologists have
examined the grounds around his fam-
ily's living quarters and concluded that
he adhered to kosher laws.
For the High Holidays of 1804, he
traveled to New York because the
Montreal synagogue had closed. The
records of New York's Shearith Israel
Congregation show that he gave chari-
ty that October and died shortly after-
ward without returning home.
Although Solomons is regarded as
Michigan's first Jewish settler,
Michigan's Upper Peninsula was actu-
ally part of Quebec until the War of
1812, said Godfrey, who calls
Solomons an important Canadian his-
torical figure, albeit one largely neg-
lected by scholars until recently.
Ezekiel Solomons is one of numer-
ous Jewish pioneers between 1740 and
1867 whose exploits are detailed in
Search Out the Land. The book focuses
on "the significant role played by Jews
in British North America in the fight
for civil and political rights."
"We all expected the Jews came after
the pogroms started in the 1880s and
that we came to someone else's coun-
try," Godfrey said. "That's absolutely
untrue. We were part of it from the
very beginning."

COMING
SOON!

p



Since 1948



RESTAURANT OF DETROIT AND TROY

313.832.1616

248.588.6000

4222 Second St. • Detroit

1477 John 11 at Maple • Troy

FRESH MEXICAN GRILLE

FRESH MEXICAN GM

FRESH MEXICAN GM!,

IT'S WHAT'S HAPPENING IN
FRESH MEXICAN FOOD!

Q

FREE TACO

EVERYTHING MADE
TO ORDER

FRESHEST
Q THE
INGREDIENTS

a

NO LARD

Steak or Chicken

(your choice of flour or corn tortilla)

One coupon per customer • Not good with any other offer • Expires 8/31/03

( 4 8 ) 8 6 5 - 7 2 7 7

DINE-IN OR CARRY-OUT

FRESN MEXICAN GRILI.

FRESH MEXICAN GRILLE

i • I -
P• m•-

6540 Orchard Lake Rd
West Bloomfield

(Corner of Maple and Orchard
Lake - next to Blockbuster)

FRESH MEXICAN GRILLE

e ice a - "

THE GALLERY RESTAURANT

I

p

Enjoy gracious dining amid a beautiful
atmosphere of casual elegance

BREAKFAST • LUNCH • DINNER

OPEN 7 DAYS: MON.- SAT. 7 a.m.- 9:30 p.m. SUN. 8 a.m.- 9 p.m.
West Bloomfield Plaza • 6638 Telegraph Road and Maple • 248-851-0313

otbasa•ft___,
Jamift•-•

8/15
2003

55

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan