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August 01, 2003 - Image 44

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-08-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Synagogues/Torah Portion

Rabbi: Jonathan V. Plaut. Cantorial soloist: Hannah
Dietz. Shabbat services 8 p.m. bi-weekly.

CONGREGATION BETH EL

2525 Mark Ave., Windsor; (519) 969-2422. Rabbi:
Jeffrey Ableser. Cantor: Marci Shulman. Services:
5:45 p.m. the first and last Friday.of the month;
p.m. intermediate Fridays.

REFORM/RENEWAL

3900 Northfield Parkway, Troy, 48084, (248) 649-
4418. Rabbi: Arnie Sleutelberg. Services: Friday 7:45
p.m. Saturday 10 a.m. Friday baby naming of Reese
Caroline Lurcott, daughter of Gregg and Rebecca
Lurcott.

TEMPLE BETH EL (FLINT)

SECULAR HUMANISTIC

2505 Bay City Road, Midland, 48642, (517) 835-
4822. Guest teacher: Hal Greenwald. President:
Stuart J. Bergs, rein. Services: Friday 8 p.m. once a
month. Regularly scheduled social events and High
Holiday services for the tri-city area.

TEMPLE BETH EMETH

2309 Packard, Ann Arbor, 48104, (734) 665-4744.
Rabbi: Robert D. Levy. Chazzan: Ann Zibelman
Rose. Services: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.
Family service once a month at 7:30 p.m. replaces 8
p.m. Friday service; call for specific dates.

BETH ISAAC SYNAGOGUE

2730 Edsel Dr., Trenton, 48183, (734) 675-0355.
Services: Friday 7:30 p.m. Congregational leaders
conduct services throughout the year.

TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL

801 W. Michigan Ave., Jackson 49202; (517) 784-
3862. Rabbi: Jonathan V. Plaut. Rabbi emeritus:
Alan Ponn. Chazzan: Evette Lutman. President: Dr.
Cathy Glick. Services: Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10
a.m. the first Saturday of the month.

CONGREGATION CHAYE OLAM

P.O. Box 250356, Franklin Village, 48025-9998,
(248) 752-6669. Cantor. Stephen L. Dubov.
Services: Friday 6:30 p.m. at the International
School, 28555 Middlebelt Road, Farmington Hills.

CONGREGATION SHIR TIKVAH

THE BIRMINGHAM TEMPLE

28611 W 12 Mile, Farmington Hills, 48334, (248)
477-1410. Founding rabbi: Sherwin T. Wine.
Rabbis: Tamara Kolton, Adam Chalom, Miriam
Jerris. Services: Friday 8 p.m.

JEWISH CULTURAL SOCIETY

2935 Birch Hollow Drive, Ann Arbor, 48108-2301,
(734) 975-9872. Board president: Karla Rice.
School principal: Ramona Brand. Shabbat services
first Friday of every month 7:30 p.m.; cultural
Jewish celebrations, secular bar/bat mitzvah pro-
gramming, cultural Sunday school.

JEWISH PARENTS INSTITUTE

JCC, 6600 W. Maple, West Bloomfield, 48322,
(248) 661-1000. Director: Marilyn Wolfe.
Alternative cultural Jewish celebrations; secular
bar/bat mitzvah ceremonies; adult programming;
cultural Sunday school from nursery through teen.

SHOLEM ALEICHEM INSTITUTE

28690 Southfield, Suite 293, Lathrup Village,
48076, (248) 423 4406. Co-presidents: Alva
Dworkin, May Moskowitz. Holiday observances;
Friday night oneg Shabbat; cultural events.

WORKMEN'S CIRCLE ARBETER RING

26341 Coolidge, Oak Park, 48237, (248) 545-0985.
Chair. Arlene Frank Michigan district director:
Ellen R. Bates-Brackett. Year round holiday obser-
vances, Nokh Shabbes Havdalah once a month; sec-
ular bar/bat mitzvah; Sunday school.

SinMARDIC
KETER TORAH SYNAGOGUE

14450 W. 10 Mile, Oak Park, 48237, (248) 967-
4020. Rabbi: Joseph P. Klein. Cantor: Norman
Rose. Services: Friday 7:30 p.m. in the garden,
weather permitting.

5480 Orchard Lake Road, West Bloomfield, (248)
681-3665. Rabbi: Michael Cohen. Services: Friday
at cancilelighting time; Saturday 9 a.m., Minchah 1
1/4 hours before the end of Shabbat; Sunday 9 a.m.;
Monday 7 a.m.; Wednesday 9 p.m., Thursday 7
a.m., 9 p.m.

TEMPLE ISRAEL

TRADITIONAL

TEMPLE EMANU-EL

5725 Walnut Lake, West Bloomfield, 48323, (248)
661-5700. Rabbis: Harold S. Loss, Paul M. Yedwab,
Joshua L. Bennett, Marla Homsten. Cantor: Lori
Corrsin. Cantorial soloist: Neil Michaels. Services:
Friday 7:30 p.m. Saturday 10:30 a.m. Monday-
Thursday 7:30 a.m. Sunday 9 a_m. Friday wedding
blessing of Melanie Lutwin and Scott Chismody;
Melissa Beth Hammerstein and Tony Oleshanslcy.

TEMPLE KOL AMI

5085 Walnut Lake, West Bloomfield, 48323, (248)
661-0040. Rabbi: Norman T. Roman. Rabbi emeri-
ms: Ernst J. Conrad. Cantorial soloist: Susan
Greener. Services: Friday 6 p.m. Saturday 10:30 a.m.

CONGREGATION SHAAREY ZEDEK

1924 Coolidge, East Lansing 48823, (517) 351-
3570. Rabbi Emeritus: Morton Hoffman. Rabbi:
Richard Baroff Cantor: Pamela Jordan Schiffer.

44

3999 Walnut Lake, West Bloomfield, 48323, (248)
737-8700. Rabbis: Dannel Schwartz, Michael L.
Moskowitz. Cantonal soloist: Penny Steyer. Services:
Friday 6:30 p.m. Saturday 11 a.m.

7400 Telegraph, Bloomfield Township, 45301, (248)
851-1100. Rabbis: Daniel B. Syme, David Scott
Castiglione. Cantor: David Montefiore. Services:
Friday 6 p.m. Saturday 10:30 am. Friday, Marshall
Loewenstein will speak. Saturday bar mitzvah of Kevin
Joshua Schechter, son of Cathy' and Alex Schechter.

TEMPLE BETH EL (MIDLAND)

8/ 1

TEMPLE SHIR SHALOM

TEMPLE BETH EL

5150 Calkins, Flint, 48532, (810) 720-9494. Rabbi:
Karen Companez. Cantorial soloist: Aleksander
Chernyak. Services: First Friday of the month 6:15
p.m.; second Friday 8 p.m.; all other Fridays 8 p.m.

2003

Services: Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.

B'NAI DAVID

6346 Orchard Lake Road, Suite 100, West
Bloomfield, 48322, (248) 855-5007. Cantor: Ben-
Zion Latimer. Services: Saturday 9 a.m. Haftorah,
Saul Chudnow.

rillNYANS

FLEISCHMAN RESIDENCE

6710 W Maple, West Bloomfield, 48322, (248)
661-2999. Rabbi: Avie Shapiro. Minchah Monday-
Thursday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday, Shabbat Schacharit
9:15 a.m.

YESHIVAT AKIVA

21100 W. 12 Mile, Southfield, 48076 (248) 386-
1625. Services: During the school year, morning
services at 7:30 a.m.; afternoon services at 2:40 p.m.
The community is invited.

Story Of Temples' Destruction
Contains Lessons For Our Time

these words and work to end bigotry of
all kinds that push people to the fringes
of society based on age, race, religion,
sexual orientation or economic class.
A community is also destroyed when
its people are so accustomed to violence
that they witness around them that they
see no peaceful future.
n the first chapter of the Book of
The horrific images in Eichah of peo-
Devarim, Moses recalls his
ple watching others die with
exasperated plea to God
no hope, of people being
when he felt overburdened
assaulted on the streets, of
as leader of a quarrelsome people:
anger and vengeance, all strike
"How can I bear unaided the
too close to home. We must
trouble of you and the burden
do all we can to eradicate the
and the bickering?"
scourge of violence from our
The word "how" is the word
midst.
eichah in Hebrew, and it is a
A community is destroyed
quirk of the Jewish calendar that
when
belief in God becomes
RABBI ROBERT
parshah Devarim is always read
a wedge to drive people apart.
DOBRUSIN
on Shabbat Hazon, the Shabbat
Even a cursory look at the
Special to the
before Tisha b'Av, the fast of the
second-Temple times shows
Jewish News
9th of Av. On that day, the sad-
sectarianism and claims of
dest on the calendar, we chant the
superiority in every part of the
Book of Eichah, Lamentations, which
community. Religious faith, both within
begins: " eichah yashvah badad' ... "how
and beyond a particular religious com-
does the city sit solitary?"
munity, must bring people together, not
The Book of Eichah is a heartbreaking
drive us apart.
book describing Jerusalem immediately
Finally, a community can be
following the destruction of the Temple.
destroyed by the actions of individuals.
On one level, we should all appreciate
The rabbis told the story of Kamza
the meaning of the holy Temples and the
and Bar Karma, which traces the
agony of their destruction. On another
destruction of the second Temple to one
level, the message of the destruction goes
particular incident in which an individ-
far beyond that particular moment in
ual was publicly embarrassed and decid-
time as the story reminds us of what can
ed to take revenge on the entire commu-
destroy communities.
nity. This great story is a condemnation
In thinking about Tisha b'Av, we
of individual insensitivity, selfishness and
must look not only at the destruction of
the failure of the leaders to properly
the Temple, but also what the stories of
respond to injustice.
the destruction can teach us about today.
As we observe Tisha b'Av this year,
The rabbis taught that the first
our thoughts are once again return to the
Temple was destroyed because of idolatry
times of great tragedy in the history of
and the second Temple was destroyed
our people. But we would be remiss if we
because of sinat hinam, baseless hatred,
didn't use the lessons of Tisha b'Av to
envy and pettiness.
inspire us to improve our own religious
A community is on the path to
communities and help our society in
destruction when people are fragmented,
general respond to the dangers that
self-centered and bent on isolating oth-
threaten us. ❑
ers. The opening of the book, "How
does the city sit solitary, she that is full of
people," inspired a question: "How can
the city be solitary if it is full"?
What recent events in the life of our
One commentary states that it was
people resonate with us more deeply
full of people who were isolated from
than the destruction of the two
each other. We, in our society, must heed
Temples? Why should we care about
the destruction if we no longer have
an interest in sacrifice? Read a copy
Robert Dobrusin is rabbi of Beth
of the story of Kamza and Bar
Israel Congregation in Ann Arbor.
Kamza to your children and ask
His e-mail address is
them what it means to them.
rdobrusin@bethisrael_AA.org

Shabbat Devarim
(Shabbat Hazon):
Deuteronomy 1:1-3:22;
Isaiah 1:1-27.

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