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The University of Michigan Library provides access to these materials for educational and research purposes. These materials may be under copyright. If you decide to use any of these materials, you are responsible for making your own legal assessment and securing any necessary permission. If you have questions about the collection, please contact the Bentley Historical Library at bentley.ref@umich.edu

July 04, 2003 - Image 45

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-07-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Synagogues/Torah Portion

CONGREGATION BETH EL

TEMPLE SHIR SHALOM

TEMPLE BETH EL

REFORM/RENEWAL

2525 Mark Ave., Windsor; (519) 969-2422. Rabbi:
Jeffrey Ableser. Cantor: Marci Shulman. Services:
5:45 p.m. the first and last Friday of the month; 8
p.m. intermediate Fridays.

7400 Telegraph, Bloomfield Township, 48301,
(248) 851-1100. Rabbis: Daniel B. Syme, David
Scott Castiglione. Cantor: David Montefiore.
Services: Friday 6 p.m. Saturday 10:30 a.m.
Friday, Alan Lowen will speak. Saturday, Sarah
Anne Beyeler, daughter of Faye Anne and Hans
Ruedi Beyeler, will read her bat mitzvah portion.

TEMPLE BETH EL (FLINT)

5150 Calkins, Flint, 48532, (810) 720-9494.
Rabbi: Karen Companez. Cantorial soloist:
Aleksander Chernyak. Services: First Friday of the
month 6:15 p.m.; second Friday 8 p.m.; all other
Fridays 8 p.m.

TEMPLE BETH EL (MIDLAND)

2505 Bay City Road, Midland, 48642, (517) 835-
4822. Guest teacher: Hal Greenwald. President:
Stuart J. Bergstein. Services: Friday 8 p.m. once a
month. Regularly scheduled social events and High
Holiday services for the tri-city area.

TEMPLE BETH EMETH

2309 Packard, Ann Arbor, 48104, (734) 665-4744.
Rabbi: Robert D. Levy. Chazzan: Ann Zibelman
Rose. Services: Friday 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m.
Family service once a month at 7:30 p.m. replaces
8 p.m. Friday service; call for specific dates.

BETH ISAAC SYNAGOGUE

3999 Walnut Lake, West Bloomfield, 48323, (248)
737-8700. Rabbis: Dannel Schwartz, Michael L.
Moskowitz. Cantorial soloist: Penny Steyer.
Services: Friday 6:30 p.m. Saturday 11 a.m.

CONGREGATION SHIR TIKVAH

3900 Northfield Parkway, Troy, 48084, (248) 649-
. 4418. Rabbi: Arnie Sleutelberg. Services: Friday
7:45 p.m. Saturday 10 a.m.

SECULAR HUMANISTIC

THE BIRMINGHAM TEMPLE

28611 W. 12 Mile, Farmington Hills, 48334, (248)
477-1410. Rabbis: Sherwin T. Wine, Tamara
Kolton, Adam Chalom, Miriam Jerris. Services:
Friday 8 p.m.

JEWISH CULTURAL SOCIETY

2935 Birch Hollow Drive, Ann Arbor, 48108-2301,
(734) 975-9872. Board president: Karla Rice.
School principal: Ramona Brand. Shabbat services
first Friday of every month 7:30 p.m.; cultural
Jewish celebrations, secular bar/bat mitzvah pro-
gramming, cultural Sunday school.

JEWISH PARENTS INSTITUTE

JCC, 6600 W. Maple, West Bloomfield, 48322,
(248) 661-1000. Director: Marilyn Wolfe.
Alternative cultural Jewish celebrations; secular
bar/bat mitzvah ceremonies; adult programming;
cultural Sunday school from nursery through teen.

SHOLEM ALEICHEM INSTITUTE

2730 Edsel Dr., Trenton, 48183, (734) 675-0355.
Services: Friday 7:30 p.m. Congregational leaders
conduct services throughout the year.

28690 Southfield, Suite 293, Lathrup Village,
48076, (248) 423-4406. Co-presidents: Alva
Dworkin, May Moskowitz. Holiday observances;
Friday night oneg Shabbat; cultural events.

TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL

WORKMEN'S CIRCLE ARBETER RING

801 W. Michigan Ave., Jackson 49202; (517) 784-
3862. Rabbi: Jonathan V. Plaut. Rabbi emeritus:
Alan Ponn. Chazzan: Evette Lutman. President: Dr.
Cathy Glick. Services: Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 10
a.m. the first Saturday of the month.

CONGREGATION CHAYE OLAM

P.O. Box 250356, Franklin Village, 48025-9998,
(248) 752-6669. Cantor: Stephen L. Dubov.
Services: Friday 6:30 p.m. at the International
School, 28555 Middlebelt Road, Farmington Hills.

TEMPLE EMANU-EL

14450 W. 10 Mile, Oak Park, 48237, (248) 967-
4020. Rabbi: Joseph P. Klein. Cantor: Norman
Rose. Services: Friday 7:30 p.m. in the garden,
weather permitting.

TEMPLE ISRAEL

5725 Walnut Lake, West Bloomfield, 48323, (248)
661-5700. Rabbis: Harold S. Loss, Paul M.
Yedwab, Joshua L. Bennett, Marla Hornsten.
Cantor: Lori Corrsin. Cantorial soloist: Neil
Michaels. Services: Friday 7:30 p.m. Saturday
10:30 a.m.

TEMPLE KOL AMI

26341 Coolidge, Oak Park, 48237, (248) 545-
0985. Chair: Arlene Frank. Michigan district direc-
tor: Ellen R. Bates-Brackett. Year round holiday
observances, Nokh Shabbes Havdalah once a
month; secular bar/bat mitzvah; Sunday school.

SEPHARDIC

KETER TORAH SYNAGOGUE

5480 Orchard Lake Road, West Bloomfield, (248)
681-3665. Rabbi: Michael Cohen. Services: Friday
at candlelighting time; Saturday 9 a.m., Minchah 1
1/4 hours before the end of Shabbat; Sunday 9
a.m.; Monday 7 a.m.; Wednesday 9 p.m., Thursday
7 a.m., 9 p.m.

TRADITIONAL

B'NAI DAVID

6346 Orchard Lake Road, Suite 100, West
Bloomfield, 48322, (248) 855-5007. Cantor: Ben-
Zion Lanxner. Services: Saturday 9 a.m. Sunday
8:30 a.m. Hatorah: Willliam lcikson.

MENTANS

FLEISCHMAN RESIDENCE

5085 Walnut Lake, West Bloomfield, 48323, (248)
661-0040. Rabbi: Norman T. Roman. Rabbi emeri-
tus: Ernst J. Conrad. Cantorial soloist: Susan
Greener. Services: Friday 6 p.m. Saturday 10:30
a.m.

6710 W. Maple, West Bloomfield, 48322, (248)
661-2999. Rabbi: Avie Shapiro. Minchah Monday-
Thursday 5:30 p.m.; Sunday, Shabbat Schacharit
9:15 a.m.

CONGREGATION SHAAREY ZEDEK

YESHIVAT AKIVA

1924 Coolidge, East Lansing 48823, (517) 351-
3570. Rabbi Emeritus: Morton Hoffman. Cantor:
Pamela Jordan Schiffer. Rabbi: Richard Baroff.
Services: Friday 8 p.m. Saturday 9 a.m.

Moses Set The Standard
For Great Leadership

21100 W. 12 Mile, Southfield, 48076 (248) 386-
1625. Services: During the school year, morning
services at 7:30 a.m.; afternoon services at 2:40
p.m. The community is invited.

their people to great achievements, to
the elimination of illiteracy; to economic
progress; to raising the standards of liv-
ing; to the attainment of peace. Instead,
that leadership, particularly of the rejec-
tionist Arab states, is based on hatred,
his week's sedrah (Torah por-
violence, destruction and despair.
tion) tells us of a great
The second accusation of Korach is
mutiny in the days of Moses,
similarly instructive. "You have failed,
led by Korach, a Levite, who
Moses." Indeed, Moses eventually died
gathers unto himself all the malcontents
in the wilderness together with that
of the people and attacks the authority
whole generation. How do we answer
of Moses.
that charge?
He lays two charges against Moses
It may be that all noble leadership
and Aaron: "Why do you raise your-
ultimately fails; for it never attains its
selves above the Assembly of God?" and
highest goals. The true leader
"You did not take us, as you
must fall because he is com-
promised, to a land flowing
mitted to an ideal so elevated,
with milk and honey Instead,
a hope so exalted that reality
you have led us to die in the
can never fully conform to his
wilderness." These complaints
vision.
attracted widespread interest
Jeremiah failed, and so did
and approval. Korach was able
Akiva. Abraham Lincoln
to win a large following.
failed, and so did Woodrow
The challenge of Korach
Wilson. But authentic leader-
causes us to address the issue of
ship is not measured by mate-
leadership. A leader can be
rial achievement.
RABBI IRWIN
defined as one whom people
The leader brings an
will follow, a compelling per-
GRONER
enhancement of life. He offers
sonality who sways the masses.
Special to the
an awareness of truth, an
But the Torah does not agree
Jewish News
experience of beauty and
with this definition. Although
goodness. The leader is only
Korach had many followers
temporarily defeated, but
and won great public support, Moses
mankind is improved; for out of his faith
was the authentic leader.
social forces arise that continue to
By what standard did the Bible estab-
express the hopes and ideals which the
lish the preeminence of Moses? For the
leader cherished.
Torah, popularity does not validate lead-
Akiva died a martyr's death, but the
ership; but moral authority does. Moses
Torah survived. Jeremiah didn't see the
recognized the need of the people; he
rebuilding of the Temple, but the
saw the degradation that slavery had
restoration came later. Lincoln didn't see
imposed upon them and he brought to
the fulfillment of his dream for a reunit-
them the discipline of the moral law.
ed America, but this took place in the
Moses presented a program to fulfill the
years and decades that followed his
Divine mandate that Israel become a
death.
"kingdom of priests and a holy nation."
All the generations that remembered
Korach was not moved by a moral
Moses, even unto our own day, were
purpose. His message is hatred; his aim
able to discover strength, courage and
is discord; his popularity arises from the
wisdom out of the spiritual gifts he had
hostility to authority he evokes from his
bestowed upon them. The ultimate vin-
followers. In his lust for power, Korach
dication of the great leader lies in a
utilizes all the destructive impulses he
future guided by his vision. 0
can manipulate.
The most-vivid contemporary illus-
tration of the spirit of Korach is in the
leadership of most of the Arab world.
Arab leaders have the capacity to lead
Who are the true leaders of soci-
ety? By what criteria do we judge
Irwin Groner is senior rabbi of
their accomplishments? How
Congregation Shaarey Zedek. His e-
valid are these criteria?
mail is smarshall@shaareyzedek.org

Shabbat Korach:
Numbers 16:1-18:32;
I Samuel 11:14-12:22.

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