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June 13, 2003 - Image 30

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-06-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Masurovsky, who was born in 1947 in
Paris, is one of the top private sleuths in
the art world.
He came to the field after working
with the U.S. State Department and the
Senate Banking Committee, investigat-
ing Nazi war crimes and the relationship
between Nazi officials and Swiss banks
and financial institutions.
Through his involvement with HARP,
a project of the B'nai Kith Klutznick
National Jewish Museum in
Washington, D.C., he helped initiate the
seizure of two valuable looted paintings
by German-Jewish artist Egon Schiele
from New York's Museum of Modern
Art. Other stolen works were discovered
at Christie's and Sotheby's, two of the
world's most prestigious auction houses.
Despite the "big bucks" involved in
these cases, Masurovsky said much loot-
ed art was taken from "the average folks
out there — not collectors who bought
them for an investment, but people who
saw art or, more often, decorative objects,
and bought them because they liked
them."
Hillel Headmaster Dr. Mark Smiley
said, "This was a great example of inte-
grating Holocaust education into the
arts. At the same time as you're learning
about the Holocaust and about art histo-
ry, you are considering what it really
means to be an ethical collector. It's val-
ues education at its best."
Among the adults at Masurovsky's talk
was Stuart Cykiert of West Bloomfield.
With his brothers Jay and Andrew, he
began Hillel's Walter Cykiert Holocaust
Education Fund in memory of their
father, a survivor of the Warsaw Ghetto
uprising.
All three Cykiert brothers are Hillel
graduates. So far, three of their children
have graduated from the Farmington
Hills school, and another two are gradu-
ating this year.
"We didn't begin this fund for recogni-
tion; my father would have hated that,"
said Stuart Cykiert. "We just want to be
the appendages for Hillel doing these
projects."
So far, the fund has underwritten tours
by Hillel upper-schoolers to the
Holocaust Memorial Center in West
Bloomfield and to the Jewish Ensemble
Theatre's productions of the play The
Diary ofAnn Fnznk. It also sponsored the
only Detroit-area showing of the New
York-based exhibit "I Never Saw Another
Butterfly," a collection of drawings and
poetry by children imprisoned in the
Terezin concentration camp.

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