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April 11, 2003 - Image 70

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-04-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

11 0 MT E

CELESRAT E

Special
For Pesach

This special, expanded sec-
tion of AppleTree celebrates the
holiday of Passover by looking
at how Jews throughout the
United States, as well as families
in England and Israel, mark the
ancient Festival of Freedom.
Included in AppleTree
Editor Elizabeth Applebaum's
report are wonderful recipes
for the holiday and a review of
the latest and greatest in
Passover haggadot.
We hope the ideas presented
here will lend spice to your
seder table, warmth to your
celebrations and depth to your
discussions of issues that have
been at the forefront of the
Jewish people's consciousness
for three millennia.
May you and yours enjoy a
wonderful holiday, while
remembering the burdens of
our forefathers and the bur-
dens of today.

Alan Hitsky
associate editor

4/11
2003

70

78 New Haggadot
79 Passover Cookery
80 Your Seder Plate
83 Pesach-At-A-Glance

ELIZABETH APPLEBAUM
AppleTree Editor

Editor's Note: For this special Pesach sec-
tion, AppleTree spoke with six very diverse
Jewish families around the world — in
Michigan, California, England, Israel
Georgia and Chicago — to see how they
and their communities celebrate the holi-
day.

Meet The Families

Nancy Collens and her husband,
Howard, live in Huntington Woods.
Native Detroiters, they have two chil-
dren: Adena, 3 1/2, and Max, 1 1 /2.
Nancy's background is in public
health, though these days she is devot-
ed full time to raising her children. The
Collens family belongs to Temple
Emanu-El in Oak Park.

John Mandelbaum was born in Kansas
City, Mo., and now lives in London
with his partner, Bruce Larsen.
John, who practices corporate law,
graduated from the University of
Kansas and Northwestern University
School of Law, and also received a
French master's in business administra-
tion from LEcole Superieure de
Commerce. In 1999, John's law firm
transferred him to London, where he
has been very active in Jewish commu-
nal affairs.

.

Diane Schaefer lives with her husband,
former Detroiter Hersh Akiva Schaefer,
in Jerusalem's East Neve Yaakov neigh-
borhood. They are observant and have
three children: Yehudah, 10, Sara, 7,
and Yitzhak, 5.
Diane made aliyah one week before
Pesach 16 years ago, just in time to ful-
fill the prayer at the end of the seder,
"Next year in Jerusalem." An unem-

ployed technical writer and a former
journalist, she is now hard at work on ,
her own projects.

Staci Berch lives in Atlanta, where she
was born and raised. For more than 11
years, she has been married to Sheldon,
and the two have a son, Louis, 7, and a
daughter, Brinkley, 4.
Louis is a first-grader at the Epstein
School, a Conservative day school, and
Brinkley attends preschool at
Congregation Etz Chaim.
Staci holds a master's of education in
social science education, and taught
high school social studies for seven
years before retiring to a full-time job
of motherhood and professional volun-
teerism.
She serves as chairman of the pre-
school board at the synagogue CA full-
time job within itself," she says), on
various committees at the synagogue,
and as a volunteer at her son's school.

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