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January 31, 2003 - Image 69

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-01-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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The messages received become rela-
tive, and the artists are rewarded
when the connections take place."

Murray Tinkelman

Bonefish Rising, Murray Tinkelman's
illustration in the show, was done
for a client, the New York Times. It
accompanied an "Op-Ed" piece that
addressed ecology issues.
"It's a skeleton of a fish hovering
over water and related to endangered
fauna," recalls Tinkelman, whose
work is highly detailed and done pri-
marily in black and white.
"I was a regular contributor to the
`Op-Ed Page.' The art director
would call, tell me about an article
and hurry me to illustrate it.
"An illustrator is a hired gun, com-
missioned to illustrate what an arti-
cle is about. In - this particular case, I
do have strong and deep feelings
about the environment, so it does
echo my thoughts. I would never
illustrate an article with which I was
in fundamental disagreement, philo-
sophically, morally or ethically."
Tinkelman, approaching 70, has
worked for virtually every national
magazine and illustrated 35 children
books. He never wanted to do any-
thing besides be an artist.
Even though Tinkelman learned
early on that he was color blind, he
went on to the High School of Art
and Design in New York City,
Cooper Union School of Art and the
Brooklyn Museum School of Art.
While working as a freelance
artist, Tinkelman became chairman
of the illustration department at the
Parsons School of Design for 14

Gabrielle Glaser:
"Even today
them is the
caricature of the
evil, conniving
Jewish nose.

In "The Nose,"
the author
charts the shifting
significances
of the nose
through different
geographies,
ethnicities and
time periods.

years and moved on to Syracuse
University, where he has been an art
professor for 25 years. He also
speaks on the history of illustration
before groups around the country.
"One of the aspects of American
illustration I deal with is the incredi-
bly racist portrayal of all minorities,
particularly around the turn of the
20th century," says Tinkelman. "The
Irish were portrayed as drunkards,
and each Jew was shown with a huge
nose," he says (see accompanying
story).
Tinkelman does not bring his
Jewish background into personal
projects. He has given much time to
capturing the Native American cul-
ture and professional rodeo cowboys
because he likes to immerse his tal-
ents into the distinguishing features
of dress.
The artist, who has visited Detroit
to complete an evaluation project for
the College for Creative Studies,
thinks of illustration as the most
democratic of all art forms.
"There's an accessibility to illustra-
tion that doesn't exist in other areas
of the visual arts," he says. "The idea
of making art that gets reproduced
in newspapers, magazines and books
is infinitely more wonderful to me
than doing a painting that only
winds up on a gallery wall."

Milton Glaser

Posters, some 300, represent only
one segment of Milton Glaser's artistic
commitments, but each project is an

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1/31

2003

69

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