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January 03, 2003 - Image 86

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Detroit Jewish News, 2003-01-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CELEBRITY
SHOWROOM

The Best Of Everything

Frolic Or Food?

As entertainment became king at nightclubs,
much fine dining was shown the door.

GARY PUCKETT
WITH JOHNNY MAESTRO
Et THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE

Gary's signature voice and hit songs like "Young
Girr have sold out venues around the world.

Johnny Maestro and the Brooklyn Bridge cover
all your favorites.

FIGHT NIGHT — PRO BOXING

Tickets include a six-course gourmet dinner
"Andiamo Style" featuring filet mignon and
a premium open bar.

TONY DANZA

One of America's most popular performers. A star
of television (Taxi, Who's the Boss, Family Law),
stage (The Ic6man Cometh), and movies (Angels
in the Outfield) Danza wows audience and critics
with his song and dance stage show.

ELVIS TO THE MAX

25 Years ago Elvis left the building. Now he returns,
or so you will think, to play for you at Andiamo. It's
Elvis to the Max with Max Pellicano, his Las Vegas
Dancers and special guest comedian Paul Locrichio.
Come sing along with all of your favorite Elvis hits.

0

L--1
rALIA ** ■
Tickets & Information

(586) 268 3200

-

andiamoitalia.com

1/ 3

2003

62

East 14 Mile Road. West of Van Dyke.
Warren, Michigan

626790)

Good food faded out of
or nostalgia buffs
night
spots because there was-
who want to take a
n't
any
real demand for it ...
long stroll down
There
were
heavy eaters like
memory lane, The
Diamond
Jim
Brady, however,
Night Club by Jimmy Durante
who
wouldn't
agree ... Only a
and Joe Kofoed, published by
few
scattered
places
were left
Alfred A. Knopf in 1931, is a
where
the
preparation
of food
treasure ... if you can find it.
was
still
a
solemn
and
mystic
I was lucky to have someone
DAN NY
rite.
loan it to me.
RAS KIN
But in the early days, a man
In some ways, it can be
lumnist
had
vermouth with the hors
Local
Co
applied to modern-day dining
d'oeuvres,
Chablis with the
out and being entertained ... In
oysters,
sherry
with the soup,
the early 1900s, according to the book,
sauterne
with
the
fish,
burgundy
with
eating out was something of an art in
the
roast,
champagne
with
the
partridge
places like New York ... People didn't go
to restaurants to dance and see half-nude and brandy with his coffee.
People took two or three hours for
girls kicking their heels in a floor show
dinner
... No one was in a hurry ... They
... They went to eat and drink first of all
would have thought it silly to fox trot
and then to be entertained.
Dancing during dinner hadn't become while the pate de foie gras waited.
If you looked over an old menu, you'd
in vogue ... About 1914, the average
see
hors d'oeuvres for 60 cents ... There
American began to feel an urge to be
was
a stalk of celery stuffed with
part of what was going on and not
Roquefort
cheese, a segment of sardine,
merely a spectator ... He wanted to put
two
slices
of
head cheese, half a boiled
some physical effort into his evening
egg sprinkled with caviar and half a baby
when he frequented cabarets.
tomato stuffed with spiced apple and
At first, the cabaret keepers were more
mayonnaise ... The dish cost less than 20
concerned with the fame of their filet
cents to prepare.
mignon aux champignons than they
Lynnhaven oysters, which wholesaled
were about how Irene and Vernon Castle
for
a dime, cost customers 40 cents ...
danced ... or the way Sophie Tucker
The
chicken soup a la Creole was 30
peddled a song ... Cabaret operators
cents
a portion ... Fried smelts Versailles
knew how a duck should be prepared
were
listed
on the menu for 50 cents
and roasted but couldn't tell an adagio
including
the
tartar sauce ... It could be
performance from trained elephants.
written
off
the
books for 12 cents ... A
No one had ever dreamed of a cover
$5 dinner was prepared for no more
charge ... Restaurateurs believed people
than $1.25.
would make them rich by eating ... and
Waiters didn't
they didn't have to charge them $4
cost
a penny ...
apiece just to park their feet under a
Headwaiters
table.
paid for their
But in the 1930s, the book says, peo-
jobs
and tray-
ple didn't go to nightclubs to eat ... If
carriers
were
they did, they'd starve to death ...
paid
$1
a day ...
Chicken sandwiches the size of postage
and
fined
$1 a
stamps, chop suey and egg foo yung
day
for
break-
would scale customers down to the size
age ... Chefs
of midgets ... The main idea wasn't to
earned $5,000
make good food but the cheapest stuff
a year.
that could be turned out at the highest
People who
prices the traffic would bear.
stuck
up their
There were some places left that fea-
noses
at
eggs
tured the chef over the comics ... but
with
grated
they were scarce ... Most of the joy-seek-
cheese for a
ers were-so blotto by 1 a.m. they could-
quarter in little
n't tell a crepe Suzette from a hamburger
restaurants,
smothered in onions.

were tickled to lay out a dollar in the
lobster palaces for oeufs a la reine
which are exactly the same thing.
People ate in famous restaurants and
paid high prices because it was the thing
to do ... just as it is today ... When good
food became scare in New York, it was
the fault of the customers who were sat-
isfied with chop suey and tough steak
sandwiches.
In some cafes, owners piled on extra
charges for bread and butter and a bowl
of cracked ice ... They figured when
you're in the job of feeding and amusing
people, you're expected to sink the hooks
into them ... If you don't, they'll go
somewhere else where the proprietor has
less conscience.
Customers like to spend, but they
don't want to believe they're being taken
for a ride.
People became tired of eating as a
form of entertainment no matter how
fine the food might be ... And so dinner
entertainment was pioneered and night-
clubs were born.
In any club, the book says, the most
important person is the headwaiter ...
He's the front man, the contact man and
the salesman for the house ... In most of
the modern restaurants, hostesses have
replaced headwaiters and its not the
same.
In the old days, if the headwaiter was
grumpy and showed no interest, the cus-
tomer was less enthusiastic and his
money stayed right down in the bottom
of his pocket.
Today, hostesses may be grumpy or far
from charming, but they seldom get a
tip ... It's the waiters and waitresses who
are most important.
MAKING ROUNDS OF yesteryears
... To Huck's Redford Inn on Grand
River, for the roadhouse style diners and
to hear Don Miller at the Hammond
organ ... To Gurney's Chop House on E.
Congress, for steak ... To Coffee Dan's

.

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